Creative AI… Dull humans…

Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

In October 2018, a portrait of Edmond Belamy sold at Christie’s in New York for $432,500, nearly 45 times its maximum estimated price. Nothing that out of the ordinary, perhaps. Except Belamy didn’t exist. He was the fictitious product of the artist’smind – and the mind that created him wasn’t even human.

Signed in the corner by a formula that is part of the algorithm that created it, the portrait was the first artwork made by artificial intelligence brought to auction. There have been many similar seeming breakthroughs in AI creativity. In 2017, an AI wrote a continuation of the Harry Potter books by using machine learning to analyse the first seven volumes of J. K. Rowling’s output. The music for US singer Taryn Southern’s 2018 album I AM AI was bigged up as having been composed and produced entirely by machines. Back in 2016, SACEM, a French professional association in charge of artists’ rights, was the first to acknowledge an algorithm, the Artificial Intelligence Virtual Artist or AIVA, as a composer.

It fits into a common theme that anything we can do, AI can do – and probably better. But it is worth looking under the hood of all these creative outputs to understand how much the machines really are doing, and how much is just hype. Answering the question of whether AI can be creative isn’t easy – and raises fundamental questions about the nature and origins of human creativity. (1)

How exquisite.

At the end, computers will understand art.

At the end, AI will create genuine art.

And we will see it.

And we will understand it.

And only then will we understand that there is no art.

Without someone not understanding it…

Author: skakos

Spiros Kakos is a thinker located in Greece. He has been Chief Editor of Harmonia Philosophica since its inception. In the past he has worked as a senior technical advisor for many years. In his free time he develops software solutions and contributes to the open source community. He has also worked as a phD researcher in the Advanced Materials sector related to the PCB industry. He likes reading and writting, not only philosophy but also in general. He believes that science and religion are two sides of the same coin and is profoundly interested in Religion and Science philosophy. His philosophical work is mainly concentrated on an effort to free thinking of "logic" and reconcile all philosophical opinions under the umbrella of the "One" that Parmenides - one of the first thinkers - visualized. The "Harmonia Philosophica" articles program is the tool that will accomplish that. Life's purpose is to be defeated by greater things. And the most important things in life are illogical. We must fight the dogmatic belief in "logic" if we are to stay humans... Credo quia absurdum!

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