Seeing what cannot be seen…

Advertisements
Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Identifying geological features in a densely vegetated, steep, and rough terrain can be almost impossible. Imagery like LiDAR can help researchers see through the tree cover, but subtle landforms can often be missed by the human eye.

A team of scientists has tapped into the power of machine learning to identify hidden geologic features. Specifically, the scientists identified previously unidentified cave entrances that were difficult to see in imagery, and hard to access on the ground. (1)

What you cannot see is still there.

Not because someone sees it. But just because it is.

And yet, we need to see it to be able to know it.

Is that an insignificant detail we should discard?

Or an important artifact that could change the world?

Is it something denoting the importance of senses?

Or something perhaps emphasizing their insignificance?

“But the cave is there!” one might say. And it could be true. But can you convince me about that? And if not, what does that mean for the cave itself? Is it still “there”? Was it there in the first place? If the cave is there only when we see it, then this is a truly scary possibility. It would mean that we rule the cosmos and that our perception shapes the shape of existence. But if the cave is there anyway, no matter what, that would mean something even scarier. That our consciousness and existence matters not. That the cave is there and that we are already inside that cave. That we never left that cave. That we are still entangled in its darkness. And exactly because of that, we are conscious!

Are we children of light?

Or are we the daughters of darkness?

Look at the Sun.

Don’t you long the Moon?

Stare at the Moon.

Do you feel the Sun burning?

Could we be asking the wrong questions from the beginning?

Search inside you.

The inability to answer questions could only mean one thing.

Neither the Sun.

Nor the Moon.

We are not the bearers of questions.

We are the answers!

Author: skakos

Spiros Kakos (or Spyros Kakos or Spyridon Kakos) [Σπύρος Κάκος] is a thinker located in Athens, Greece. He has been the Chief Editor of Harmonia Philosophica since its inception. Spiros has a diploma in Chemical Engineering, an MSc in Advanced Materials' Technology, an MBA in Decisions' Science, a phD in the use of conductive polymers in PCB industry and is still learning. He also worked as a technical advisor and a researcher in the Advanced Materials sector for many years in the past. In his free time he develops software solutions and contributes to the open source community. He is the creator of Huo Chess, one of the smallest micro-chess programs ever that is perfect for educational purposes. He believes that science and religion are two sides of the same coin and is profoundly interested in Religion and Science philosophy, as well as the philosophy of the irrational. His philosophical work is mainly concentrated on an effort to free thinking of "logic" and reconcile all philosophical opinions under the umbrella of the "One" that Parmenides - one of the first thinkers - visualized. Since our thought is dictated by our assumptions, the only way to free it and know cosmos as it is, is to think irrationally and destroy everything we have built. The "Harmonia Philosophica" articles program is the tool that will accomplish that. Life's purpose is to be defeated by greater things. And the most important things in life are illogical. We must fight the dogmatic belief in "logic" if we are to stay humans. We should stop thinking in order to think. Credo quia absurdum!

Exit mobile version
%%footer%%