Stop listening to the music…

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How listening to music ‘significantly impairs’ creativity: The popular view that music enhances creativity has been challenged by researchers who say it has the oppositeeffect. Psychologists investigated the impact of background music on performance by presenting people with verbal insight problems that are believed to tap creativity. They found that background music ‘significantly impaired’ people’s ability to complete tasks testing verbal creativity – but there was no effect for background library noise. (1)

If you want to create music, you must stop listening to music…

If you want to write a great novel, never spend much time reading great novels…

Listen to the whispers in the wind.

If you want to understand them, just stop whispering yourself…

There is wisdom in the silence of the ocean…

But you must drown in it in order to hear it…

And only then will you be able to swim to the shore.

Stop listening to the music.

And your feet will start dancing…

Art for… Science? How sad…

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Arias for the Anthropocene? In a new opera inspired by environmental catastrophe, the Anthropocene is not just the geological epoch that bears our grubby fingerprints; it is also the name of an Arctic research ship that becomes trapped in ice and uncovers a mystery. Reviewer Patrick Goymer, chief editor of Nature Ecology & Evolution, lauds the music but questions the depth of enquiry offered by the tale. (1)

Art in the service of science.

How sad…

In the old days science used to be irrational.

Mixed with religion, it saw the cosmos as a whole.

Now we have rational science.

And we try to also draw art into the abyss of logic as well.

But you cannot see the cosmos through a clear window.

Because the cosmos is not outside.

And the more you see, the less you pay attention to the essence of the world.

Listen to the 9th of Beethoven.

Can’t you feel it?

No, you do not like it because of what you hear…

Move… Think… Dance…

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Boys with good motor skills are better problem-solvers than their less skillful peers, a study shows. In contrast to previous studies, the researchers found no association between aerobic fitness or overweight and obesity with cognitive function in boys. (1)

Moving into the dark forest.

Perceiving.

But do you move in order to perceive?

Or do you perceive because you move?

Stand still.

And you will see everything.

For the cosmos is not out there.

But inside you…

A man alone.

Dancing on the brink of existence.

Making the whole world go around…

The past does die… Can you listen to it being born?

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Lawrence Brooks [source]

Meet Lawrence Brooks.

The oldest WWII veteran aged 110, holding a photo of his younger self in the picture above.

He is oldest American WWII veteran and also the oldest living man in the United States. Born in September 12, 1909 (source).

Proud past.

Holding our present together.

But there is a dark secret behind it.

Because you see…

Light needs darkness to be born.

You see..

One day he will be gone.

Unfortunately…

One day we will forget.

One day…

The past will die.

Sadly.

It is the only way it can be reborn.

And in the midst of the most glorious peacful day…

While drawing its last silent breath…

The drums of War will start humming loud and clear far far away…

Creating with style…

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In search of inspiration for improving computer-based text translators, researchers at Dartmouth College turned to the Bible for guidance. The result is an algorithm trained on various versions of the sacred texts that can convert written works into different styles for different audiences.

Internet tools to translate text between languages like English and Spanish are widely available. Creating style translators – tools that keep text in the same language but transform the style – have been much slower to emerge. The Dartmouth-led team saw in the Bible “a large, previously untapped dataset of aligned parallel text.” Beyond providing infinite inspiration, each version of the Bible contains more than 31,000 verses that the researchers used to produce over 1.5 million unique pairings of source and target verses for machine-learning training sets.

“The English-language Bible comes in many different written styles, making it the perfect source text to work with for style translation,” said Keith Carlson, a PhD student at Dartmouth and lead author of the research paper about the study.

As an added benefit for the research team, the Bible is already thoroughly indexed by the consistent use of book, chapter and verse numbers. The predictable organization of the text across versions eliminates the risk of alignment errors that could be caused by automatic methods of matching different versions of the same text.

“The Bible is a ‘divine’ data set to work with to study this task,” said Daniel Rockmore, a professor of computer science at Dartmouth and contributing author on the study. “Humans have been performing the task of organizing Bible texts for centuries, so we didn’t have to put our faith into less reliable alignment algorithms.” (1)

In the beginning there was Logos.

And we tried to express God with words.

We were bad at it in the beginning.

But gradually we learned.

To use words better.

To express ourselves.

To make art with lifeless marking on white paper.

And people read and wept.

And people believed and followed.

And people forgot.

And people became indifferent.

At the end, the markings on the paper were dead.

Being nothing more than sad reminders.

That we once upon a time were alive.

That we used to be part of God.

In the beginning there was Logos.

And we tried to express God with words.

We were so good at it in the beginning…

PS. Dartmouth College has a long history of innovation in computer science. The term “artificial intelligence” was coined at Dartmouth during a 1956 conference that created the AI research discipline. Other advancements include the design of BASIC – the first general-purpose and accessible programing language – and the Dartmouth Time-Sharing System that contributed to the modern-day operating system.