Longevity. Xenon 124. Universe.

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Theory predicts the isotope’s radioactive decay has a half-life that surpasses the age of the universe “by many orders of magnitude,” but no evidence of the process has appeared until now.

An international team of physicists that includes three Rice University researchers – assistant professor Christopher Tunnell, visiting scientist Junji Naganoma and assistant research professor Petr Chaguine – have reported the first direct observation of two-neutrino double electron capture for xenon 124, the physical process by which it decays. Their paper appears this week in the journal Nature.

While most xenon isotopes have half-lives of less than 12 days, a few are thought to be exceptionally long-lived, and essentially stable. Xenon 124 is one of those, though researchers have estimated its half-life at 160 trillion years as it decays into tellurium 124. The universe is presumed to be merely 13 to 14 billion years old.

The new finding puts the half-life of Xenon 124 closer to 18 sextillion years. (For the record, that’s 18,000,000,000,000,000,000,000.) (1)

We look up to the universe.

We admire the cosmos in awe.

But the cosmos is nothing more than the shell.

What is in it, is important.

Even particles can outlive the universe.

What matters is what cannot.

One day we will discover how huge the cosmos really is.

One day we will know how tiny we actually are.

And only then, will we understand that we were wrong.

About how significant we are.

Especially because we are not…

Bubbles… Being…

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The flow of granular materials, such as sand and catalytic particles used in chemical reactors, and enables a wide range of natural phenomena, from mudslides to volcanos, as well as a broad array of industrial processes, from pharmaceutical production to carbon capture. While the motion and mixing of granular matter often display striking similarities to liquids, as in moving sand dunes, avalanches, and quicksand, the physics underlying granular flows is not as well-understood as liquid flows.

Now, a recent discovery by Chris Boyce, assistant professor of chemical engineering at Columbia Engineering, explains a new family of gravitational instabilities in granular particles of different densities that are driven by a gas-channeling mechanism not seen in fluids. Boyce’s team observed an unexpected Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T)-like instability in which lighter grains rise through heavier grains in the form of “fingers” and “granular bubbles.” R-T instabilities, which are produced by the interactions of two fluids of different densities that do not mix — oil and water, for example — because the lighter fluid pushes aside the heavier one, have not been seen between two dry granular materials.

The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to demonstrate that “bubbles” of lighter sand form and rise through heavier sand when the two types of sand are subject to vertical vibration and upward gas flow, similar to the bubbles that form and rise in lava lamps. (1)

In a world full of being, bubbles of existence will always emerge.

Don’t be too fascinated by them. For when you try to catch them, they vanish.

In a cosmos looking up to the stars, people forget to look beyond the world.

Don’t be fooled.

It is not the bubbles rising to the sky.

 It is the sky coming down on them…

At some point it will touch you.

And you will start rising along with them…

Fragile and awesome.

Ready to explode…

At the very first touch of death…

Learning. Remembering. Crying.

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Scientists have revealed the structure of a critical receptor in the brain associated with learning, memory, behavior and mood. The new research is the first to reveal the structure of AMPA receptors in their natural state. This discovery could lead to new insight about the mechanism behind a wide range of nervous system disorders and diseases. (1)

Humans wandering in the cosmos.

Learning things.

Remembering things.

Changing moods.

Trying to find a clearing in a forest full of life.

Feeling anxious. Alone. Sad.

There was a time when we felt nothing.

When there was nothing to learn.

Nothing to remember.

No receptors.

For we were there ones who omitted knowledge.

We were the ones who made things memorable.

Bridging the Gap between death and life.

Between being and existing.

Everything is wet.

But there is no rain falling.

Empty forest.

Can you feel it?

Tears down your cheek…

Learning. Remembering. Crying.

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Photo by Sebastian Voortman from Pexels

Scientists have revealed the structure of a critical receptor in the brain associated with learning, memory, behavior and mood. The new research is the first to reveal the structure of AMPA receptors in their natural state. This discovery could lead to new insight about the mechanism behind a wide range of nervous system disorders and diseases. (1)

Humans wandering in the cosmos.

Learning things.

Remembering things.

Changing moods.

Trying to find a clearing in a forest full of life.

Feeling anxious. Alone. Sad.

There was a time when we felt nothing.

When there was nothing to learn.

Nothing to remember.

No receptors.

For we were there ones who omitted knowledge.

We were the ones who made things memorable.

Bridging the Gap between death and life.

Between being and existing.

Everything is wet.

But there is no rain falling.

Empty forest.

Can you feel it?

Tears down your cheek…

Lightning strikes twice. Life. Death. A storm still raging…

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Photo by Sebastian Voortman from Pexels

Scientists have used the LOFAR radio telescope to study the development of lightning flashes in unprecedented detail. Their work reveals that the negative charges inside a thundercloud are not discharged all in a single flash, but are in part stored alongside the leader channel at Interruptions, inside structures which the researchers have called needles. This may cause a repeated discharge to the ground. (1)

Repetition.

The silent signals of One in a seemingly changing cosmos.

Everything different.

Everything the same.

Where life has existed before, life will rise again.

Where death manifested once, death will always be.

In a cosmos full of existence, being defined the forest.

In a cosmos defined by being, the forest always is.

Look at the rainbow.

Take pleasure from the sunny sky.

Fear not, but rejoice.

For the storm is not over yet…

Rain falls down.

But you do not feel wet.

Falling upon the cosmos.

Over and over again.

You are that rain.

Can you feel the dirt?