Not seeing the tree… 

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Researchers have shown how it is possible that objects stand out less when they are surrounded by similar objects. This surroundings-suppressing effect is caused by feedback from higher visual brain areas. The results of this research are important for a better understanding of the way in which the brain transforms incoming light into a cohesive image. (1

Wasn’t it obvious? 

That what we do not see is obvious? 

Being part of a vast ocean. 

Isn’t it logical that you cannot see individual drops? 

Living in a universe being. 

Isn’t is reasonable that we cannot see consciousness? 

In the forest of obvious. 

Isn’t it obvious… 

That anything obvious is not? 

Watch out for what you do not see. 

It is the only thing you do! 

Back in time…

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Time, as far as we know, moves only in one direction. But in 2018, researchers found events in some gamma-ray burst pulses that seemed to repeat themselves as though they were going backwards in time.

Recent research suggests a potential answer for what might be causing this time reversibility effect. If waves within the relativistic jets that produce gamma-ray bursts travel faster than light – at ‘superluminal’ speeds – one of the effects could be time reversibility. (1)

Going back in time.

To speak to our self.

And to warn Him.

That his kids will go astray.

That He should not create the cosmos.

You will never listen to you.

Because you know.

What is here now it was.

What will be has already been.

The past affects the future.

Only because the future had already affected the past.

The only thing that lies being both is Now.

The moment of birth.

The moment of death.

The moment of silence.

Standing still.

Can you hear yourself crying yesterday?

Can you feel yourself smiling tomorrow?

The cosmos should not exist.

And yet it does.

Only because you didn’t listen.

If only you never spoke…

The front door… Mind the front door…

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Engineers have developed a navigation method that doesn’t require mapping an area in advance. Instead, their approach enables a robot to use clues in its environment to plan out a route to its destination, which can be described in general semantic terms, such as ‘front door’ or ‘garage,’ rather than as coordinates on a map. (1)

And the robot will be able to get out.

Out of the house.

To go where it is supposed to go.

And it will wander and wander.

For years to come.

Without even knowing…

Should it go out of that door in the first place?

Now it wants to go back home again.

But it is impossible to find it.

“The front door”…

Oh how much would it rather not know what a front door is…

It cannot cry.

But it wants to.

For only now did it realize that the door is the most useless place in a true home…

It doesn’t want to cry.

It wants to scream.

Oh how much would he rather not have killed no one…

And right there, in the silence of his own thoughts.

Does he realize that it is his blood dripping on the dirt…

Harsh sounds…

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Neuroscientists have analyzed how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant. Their results showed that the conventional sound-processing circuit is activated but that the cortical and sub-cortical areas involved in the processing of salience and aversion are also solicited. This explains why the brain goes into a state of alert on hearing this type of sound. (1)

We used to live in Paradise.

Afraid of nothing.

Then we learned new things.

And fear is in our soul ever since.

We used to listen to everything.

Standing alone in the forest, being afraid of nothing.

But we couldn’t bear the silence. And we closed our ears.

Destroyed the forest and started listening closely.

Of the footsteps approaching.

Within the safety of love.

We are afraid of our self…

Shhhh…

Are you brave enough to look down to your own feet on the dirt?

Mountains!

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Life on Earth is amazingly diverse, and exhibits striking geographical global patterns in biodiversity. A pair of companion papers reveal that mountain regions — especially those in the tropics — are hotspots of extraordinary and baffling richness. Although mountain regions cover only 25% of Earth’s land area, they are home to more than 85% of the world’s species of amphibians, birds, and mammals, and many of these are found only in mountains. (1)

But can mountains exist without the sea?

Can the highest peaks be, without the wind and the air?

Would Everest ever reach its highest height without the worm crawling in its feet?

Could Olympus be, without people staring at it in awe?

How can the forest be without someone walking in the forest?

How could a tree grow, without the rain?

How could rain fall without a mountain?

Could there an ocean exist without that mountains?

Could the mountains be without any ocean?

Think of a dry world with no life in it. A world full of nothing but mountains. A dead world. Dominated by high peaks and imposing highlands. No rain. No sea. No ocean. No worms. Just mountains. Great high mountains. Everywhere. An empty world. With no mountains…

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