Bubbles… Being…

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The flow of granular materials, such as sand and catalytic particles used in chemical reactors, and enables a wide range of natural phenomena, from mudslides to volcanos, as well as a broad array of industrial processes, from pharmaceutical production to carbon capture. While the motion and mixing of granular matter often display striking similarities to liquids, as in moving sand dunes, avalanches, and quicksand, the physics underlying granular flows is not as well-understood as liquid flows.

Now, a recent discovery by Chris Boyce, assistant professor of chemical engineering at Columbia Engineering, explains a new family of gravitational instabilities in granular particles of different densities that are driven by a gas-channeling mechanism not seen in fluids. Boyce’s team observed an unexpected Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T)-like instability in which lighter grains rise through heavier grains in the form of “fingers” and “granular bubbles.” R-T instabilities, which are produced by the interactions of two fluids of different densities that do not mix — oil and water, for example — because the lighter fluid pushes aside the heavier one, have not been seen between two dry granular materials.

The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to demonstrate that “bubbles” of lighter sand form and rise through heavier sand when the two types of sand are subject to vertical vibration and upward gas flow, similar to the bubbles that form and rise in lava lamps. (1)

In a world full of being, bubbles of existence will always emerge.

Don’t be too fascinated by them. For when you try to catch them, they vanish.

In a cosmos looking up to the stars, people forget to look beyond the world.

Don’t be fooled.

It is not the bubbles rising to the sky.

 It is the sky coming down on them…

At some point it will touch you.

And you will start rising along with them…

Fragile and awesome.

Ready to explode…

At the very first touch of death…

Big data… Plants… Planets… Universe…

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A group of Florida Museum of Natural History scientists has issued a “call to action” to use big data to tackle longstanding questions about plant diversity and evolution and forecast how plant life will fare on an increasingly human-dominated planet.

In a commentary published today in Nature Plants, the scientists urged their colleagues to take advantage of massive, open-access data resources in their research and help grow these resources by filling in remaining data gaps.

“Using big data to address major biodiversity issues at the global scale has enormous practical implications, ranging from conservation efforts to predicting and buffering the impacts of climate change,” said study author Doug Soltis, a Florida Museum curator and distinguished professor in the University of Florida department of biology. “The links between big data resources we see now were unimaginable just a decade ago. The time is ripe to leverage these tools and applications, not just for plants but for all groups of organisms”. (1)

Trying to understand the big picture.

By analyzing it all.

But you can never judge a book by reading all its pages.

You just read one. And then throw it away. Since you will already filled with the undying spirit of the author’s inspiration.

You can never judge a bottle of wine by drinking it all.

You just get a sip. And then spit it out. For you will be already full with the perfection of its taste and the distinctiveness of its aroma.

We cannot judge the cosmos by knowing everything about it. But only by sensing it to the point of remembering nothing about it.

Just see a butterfly fly.

Watch it die.

Sense eternity in its every dying breath…

Complexity. Animals. Life. Death. Evolution. You.

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In the beginning, life was small. For billions of years, all life on Earth was microscopic, consisting mostly of single cells. Then suddenly, about 570 million years ago, complex organisms including animals with soft, sponge-like bodies up to a meter long sprang to life. And for 15 million years, life at this size and complexity existed only in deep water.

Scientists have long questioned why these organisms appeared when and where they did: in the deep ocean, where light and food are scarce, in a time when oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere was in particularly short supply. A new study from Stanford University, published Dec. 12 in the peer-reviewed Proceedings of the Royal Society B, suggests that the more stable temperatures of the ocean’s depths allowed the burgeoning life forms to make the best use of limited oxygen supplies.

The Stanford team, in collaboration with colleagues at Yale University, propose that the need for a haven from (temperature) change may have determined where larger animals could evolve. “The only place where temperatures were consistent was in the deep ocean,” Sperling said. In a world of limited oxygen, the newly evolving life needed to be as efficient as possible and that could only be achieved in the relatively stable depths. “That’s why animals appeared there,” he said. (1)

Chaos. Out of order.

Order. Out of chaos.

Life out of death.

Death as the result of life.

The universe tries to talk.

But only the deaf ones will listen.

Where there is change, there will be stability.

Where there is stability, there will be change.

And only the blind ones will see.

Seek yourself again.

In the ocean depths.

Where you used to be.

But are not anymore…

Swimming in the surface you are now.

Trying to make out the meaning of the waves.

But the foundations lie deep beneath.

Seek yourself again.

In the ocean depths.

Where you used to be.

But are not anymore…

Row by row…

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Just as children follow a rule to line up single file after recess, some materials use an underlying rule to assemble on surfaces one row at a time, according to the study done at PNNL, the University of Washington, UCLA, and elsewhere.

Nucleation – that first formation step – is pervasive in ordered structures across nature and technology, from cloud droplets to rock candy. Yet despite some predictions made in the 1870s by the American scientist J. Willard Gibbs, researchers are still debating how this basic process happens.

The new study verifies Gibbs’ theory for materials that form row by row. Led by UW graduate student Jiajun Chen, working at PNNL, the research uncovers the underlying mechanism, which fills in a fundamental knowledge gap and opens new pathways in materials science. (1)

In a 3-dimensional world, you can choose to be one-dimensional.

In a one-dimensional cosmos, you can choose to have depth and width.

Inside the void, you can become everything.

But only the potential of nothingness,

Can promise the completeness of everything.

And only the agony of completeness,

Can deliver the full potential of death.

Look the mirror and behold.

There is darkness in the light.

It is only when you see that the void is full,

That you realize cannot turn into anything else,

Than yourself…

The circle will not turn into square.

A circle on the dirt…

Dripping blood…

A man dead.

Telling time…

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In music, sports and other activities, we calculate movement in two different parts of the brain: One type of anticipatory timing relies on memories from past experiences. The other on rhythm. Both are critical to our ability to navigate and enjoy the world, and scientists have found they are handled in two different parts of the brain. (1)

But there is nothing in the past.

Everything is now.

Here, living with you.

Destroyed the very moment you stop thinking about them.

But there is no rhythm.

Everything is in and out of sync.

Within the soil, with the worms eating the earth.

Up in the stars, within the galaxies and through the cosmos.

The cosmos is dancing.

Only if you listen to the music.

You can see the past and the rhythm if you believe in time.

But you will never see time if you see the past and feel the rhythm.

For it is then that you will realize that there is nothing which passes by, only things which are. A dancer does not expect the end of the music. He just moves in thin air with the expectation of eternity in his every step. A dreamer does not feel that those beautiful moments have passed. He just cries smiles with the firm belief of eternity in his every tear.

Look outside the window.

There is rain pouring down.

Why do you smile then?