Religious violence. Analyzed?

Artificial intelligence can help us to better understand the causes of religious violence and to potentially control it, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. The study is one of the first to be published that uses psychologically realistic AI – as opposed to machine learning.

The study published in The Journal for Artificial Societies and Social Stimulation, combined computer modelling and cognitive psychology to create an AI system able to mimic human religiosity, allowing them to better understand the conditions, triggers and patterns for religious violence. (1)

We like to analyze things.

To find the logic behind the deepest evil.

But there is not logic in the shadows.

The cosmos is a bad place.

Full of free will and degradation.

Devil’s biggest trick is that he has convinced us he does not exist.

You must believe that there is malice in the cosmos in order to fight it.

No logic. No cause and effect. Just pure malice.

But there is a way out.

The darkness can be fought.

But not through the light.

This is too logical and predictable to even remotely work.

But through transforming the darkness itself.

Look inside.

You are the raging abyss.

Dark.

Furious.

The destroyer of worlds.

And at the same time…

The life-giver of the cosmos.

A small snail.

A delicate flower.

Birds singing.

It is not that the abyss is far away.

This IS the abyss.

Whispering gently…

Are you afraid enough?

Why be nice?

Kindness and selflessness are widespread among both humans and animals. Many people donate to charity and feel significantly happier as a direct result of doing so. In the animal kingdom, many species show kindness by refraining from violence when settling conflicts. Instead they may use comparatively harmless fighting conventions.

The benefits gained from receiving kindness are intuitively obvious. But the motivations for engaging in kindness are much less so. In fact, the very existence of kindness and altruism seems to contradict Darwin’s theory of evolution, based as it is on a competitive process of natural selection in which only the fittest survive.

For example, the selfless behaviour of sterile ants, who protect their colonies from dangerous predators, poses a problem that Darwin himself at first considered “insuperable, and actually fatal to my whole theory”.

So how could kind behaviour have evolved – and why was it not eliminated by natural selection? Many theorists have grappled with this problem over the years. The article reviews the most prominent ideas of science up to now. (1)

In essence, all theories which try to explain kindness actually refute it: in all of them there is some kind of benefit coming out of the kind action. And what scientists don’t understand is that this actually makes the action… not kind!

You are not good when you calculate things.

You are not a nice person when you know why you love someone.

You are not a saint when you can analyze exactly why you are…

Kindness is inherently illogical.

Being good is being insane.

Caring in a cosmos which seems void and dark.

Loving in a cosmos which seems pointless and evil.

And yet this insanity is the warmest thing in this cold universe…

Happy Christmas!

For no (apparent) reason…

Being a psychopath. “Saving” people?

New research shows that people would sacrifice one person to save a larger group of people – and in addition, the force with which they carry out these actions could be predicted by psychopathic traits.

The study, led by the University of Plymouth, compared what people ‘said’ they would do with what they actually ‘did’ by comparing a questionnaire with actions in immersive moral dilemmas created using virtual-haptic technologies (i.e. using a robotic device which measures force, resistance, and speed, whilst simulating the action of harming a human).

In several dilemmas, participants had to decide whether to sacrifice a person by performing a harmful action against them, in order to save a larger group of people.

While all individuals were more likely to sacrifice others in these immersive environments than in questionnaire-based assessments, people with strong psychopathic traits were more likely to generate these harmful actions with greater physical power. (1)

People tend to believe they are gods today. Gods able to decide who can live and who will die. But everyone dies. God is not God because He can save some from death. But because he can love them even though they do die. As bodies and as souls. God is there not to kill a person in order to save many.

It takes the devil to decide to act…

It takes a devil to do something and save someone…

Because most of the times you will kill another person at the same time…

At the end, it takes a human not to act.

It takes a human to be God…

Autoimmune diseases. The usefulness of forgetting. The paths…

Sciences analyze how autoimmune diseases work. The problem comes when the body incorrectly identifies a normal protein as a threat. When that happens, the B cell selection process produces what are known as autoantibodies that prove very effective at harming our own bodies.

“Over time, the B cells that initially produce the ‘winning’ autoantibodies begin to recruit other B cells to produce additional damaging autoantibodies – just as ripples spread out when a single pebble is dropped into water”, says Degn. This has only been examined in mice so far, but the researchers now want to use the confetti model to look at how B cell production of autoantibodies is regulated and gets sped up.

Eventually, blocking the germinal centres in some way could put a break in the vicious cycle that autoimmune diseases create. It would effectively block the immune system’s short term memory, but that kind of treatment is still a long way off. (1)

Sometimes forgetting is useful.

Helping you start over when the path chosen is wrong.

The path of righteousness is a difficult path. Almost impossible to choose. You walk happy and free of sorrow. In the path of evil. Nonetheless, you don’t see evil. You see righteousness. But it is too easy. Too good to be true. Something is wrong. You see death at the end and start questioning the path. Why would that path lead there?

You try to forget what you think you know.

You try to remember.

Yes, there is another path. A darker path.

A path crossing through the dark alleys of death.

A path leading to life…

Afraid to shoot strangers!

Ever seen a movie depicting US Civil War?

Ever wandered how can a regiment of people WALK TOWARDS another regiment of people shooting at them and still have some people alive after 10 minutes of battle?

Well, there is an answer that would surprise you!

US Civil War regiments had the firepower to kill 500-1,000 opponents per minute. But the reality is that they killed 1-2 opponents per minute! Most of the soldiers found it difficult to shoot at an exposed enemy! Armies around the world have worked hard to produce fighters that they would kill another person with no remorse. From the 20% of the soldiers firing at enemies during US Civil War, we reached 50% in the Korean war while currently that rate is at about 90%. [Air International, October 2013, p. 84-85]

Man is not made to kill man. Man is not made to shoot at others nor push buttons to make others explode.

How… inconvenient!

Modern civilization must find a way through that “problem”! And it is most unfortunate that we do not see that its HAS indeed found a solution to that problem.

Being good is not just about not doing bad.

It’s about actively DENYING bad its way into your soul…

FIGHT BACK!

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