Draw… you.

Photo by luiisrtz from Pexels

It’s the archetypal child’s drawing – family, pet, maybe a house and garden, and the child themselves. Yet, how do children represent themselves in their drawings, and does this representation alter according to who will look at the picture? A research found that children’s expressive drawings of themselves vary according to the authority of and familiarity with the adult who will view the picture. (1)

Drawing the cosmos.

Drawing your mother.

Drawing your father.

But do you know… you?

The hardest things to draw are the ones we know the most. Because the essence of things lies not on the outside. But on the things which are left unseen. Any line on paper will not reveal more about who you are. But it will obscure the true self that lies beneath the veil of existence.

Blank paper.

A tear staining the white surface.

Empty circles.

Can you smile?

Can you see the cosmos behind the lines?

Row by row…

Just as children follow a rule to line up single file after recess, some materials use an underlying rule to assemble on surfaces one row at a time, according to the study done at PNNL, the University of Washington, UCLA, and elsewhere.

Nucleation – that first formation step – is pervasive in ordered structures across nature and technology, from cloud droplets to rock candy. Yet despite some predictions made in the 1870s by the American scientist J. Willard Gibbs, researchers are still debating how this basic process happens.

The new study verifies Gibbs’ theory for materials that form row by row. Led by UW graduate student Jiajun Chen, working at PNNL, the research uncovers the underlying mechanism, which fills in a fundamental knowledge gap and opens new pathways in materials science. (1)

In a 3-dimensional world, you can choose to be one-dimensional.

In a one-dimensional cosmos, you can choose to have depth and width.

Inside the void, you can become everything.

But only the potential of nothingness,

Can promise the completeness of everything.

And only the agony of completeness,

Can deliver the full potential of death.

Look the mirror and behold.

There is darkness in the light.

It is only when you see that the void is full,

That you realize cannot turn into anything else,

Than yourself…

The circle will not turn into square.

A circle on the dirt…

Dripping blood…

A man dead.

Irregularities…

A study exploring the coupling between heat and particle currents in a gas of strongly interacting atoms highlights the fundamental role of quantum correlations in transport phenomena, breaks the revered Wiedemann-Franz law, and should open up an experimental route to testing novel ideas for thermoelectric devices. (1)

Irregularities between thermal and electrical conductivity.

Just an example of irregularities found everywhere.

Every time we try to imagine patterns or similarities, something comes up to make us remember that the cosmos is chaos and not order. And then, just when we thought we have understood everything, we see order again. A whole universe balancing between two completely opposite states.

Chaos and order.

Order and chaos.

A cosmos trying to tell us the secret we do not want to hear.

Watch closely. Listen.

There is nothing there…

Ethics in numbers = No ethics.

It’s easy to understand why natural selection favors people who help close kin at their own expense: It can increase the odds the family’s genes are passed to future generations. But why assist distant relatives? Mathematical simulations by a University of Utah anthropologist suggest “socially enforced nepotism” encourages helping far-flung kin.

The classic theory of kin selection holds that “you shouldn’t be terribly nice to distant kin because there isn’t much genetic payoff,” says Doug Jones, an associate professor of anthropology and author of the new study. “Yet what anthropologists have observed over and over is that a lot of people are pretty altruistic toward distant kin”.

Jones seeks to expand the classic theory with his concept of socially enforced nepotism, which he calls a “souped-up version of the theory of kin selection” in his study published June 15, 2016, by the Public Library of Science’s online journal PLOS ONE.

Socially enforced nepotism “depends on the moral regulation of behavior according to socially transmitted norms”, he writes in the study.

The findings suggest that “a lot of why you help your kin, including distant kin, isn’t necessarily because you like them so much but because it’s your duty, your responsibility, and other people care whether you do it”, he says. (1)

Mathematics to calculate compassion. Numbers to measure ethics. Some years ago this would be considered blasphemy. Now we are gods and nothing is considered blasphemy. Now we are gods. Because we have killed God. Not with weapons or philosophy. But with sheer stupidity. We simply chose to believe in equations. We simply chose to believe in numbers.

Now nothing exists.

Except numbers.

One. Zero.

Well, mainly zero.

All other numbers are simply additions to zero.

In the old times philosophers believed in One. Once upon a time we started believing in Zero. And mathematics were created.

We have built our lives on nothingness.

And this is what we end up with.

As below, so above.

Zero. Unknown. And yet, so familiar…

When seeing a number of dots, a weird process takes place in our brain. According to a new research, the parietal lobe registers the lack of any dots as a missing visual stimulus, without quantitative significance and therefore fundamentally different from numbers. But at the next level at which processing takes place, the frontal lobe, the neurons treated the absence of elements as an empty set among other countable sets, with the greatest similarity to the number one. “Not until it gets to the frontal lobe does the empty set become abstracted as a value on the number line, analogously with the behavior of the animals” says Professor Andreas Nieder. (1)

Our internal knowledge of “nothing” drives us.

We believe we discover the world.

But we already know it…

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