Massive filaments fuel the growth of galaxies and supermassive black holes

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Based on direct observations researchers have discovered massive filaments between galaxies in a proto-cluster, extending over more than 1 million parsecs and providing the fuel for intense formation of stars and the growth of super massive black holes within the proto-cluster. (1)

A filament fit for space: Silk is proven to thrive in outer space temperatures

The scientists who discovered that natural silks get stronger the colder they get, have finally solved the puzzle of why. (2)

Delicate structures in space.

Delicate creatures on Earth.

Holding together.

Patiently watching.

Afraid to break.

But it is not the unbreakable that God dreams of.

One day you will break.

And realize that that was what the cosmos was afraid all that time…

Delicate silk. Delicate humans.

Breaking apart.

And within their weakness.

With their cries and despair.

Rising together.

To hold the cosmos in their fragile arms…

Children. Adults. Lies.

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‘If you don’t behave, I’ll call the police,’ is a lie that parents might use to get their young children to behave. Parents’ lies elicit compliance in the short term, but a new psychology study suggests that they are associated with detrimental effects when the child becomes an adult. (1)

At the end, the truth will always come to light.

So don’t be afraid if it. Use it.

Lies will only breed lies.

Look at humans today. So engulfed in their need for life.

Trying to convince themselves that there is nothing more important.

And the quest for life creates what else but more thirst for life!

More thirst for sensing the cosmos.

More thirst for feeling the universe.

A deep urge to find other sources of life elsewhere!

And we will keep on going until we discover life everywhere!

At the end, we will behold a loving universe.

So beautiful.

So vibrant.

So true.

So perfectly wrong…

Question the obvious!

Only fake things are perfect.

Only illusions are so true.

There is ugliness in truth. For it is raw in nature. Killing anything which does not exist. And since nothing does, a loving cosmos cannot do anything but wrench the world in blood.

Do you dare sacrifice yourself?

Hey kid!

Who told you you were alive in the first place?

Understanding language. Word by word…

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The capacity for language is distinctly human. It allows us to communicate, learn things, create culture, and think better. Because of its complexity, scientists have long struggled to understand the neurobiology of language.

In the classical view, there are two major language areas in the left half of our brain. Broca’s area (in the frontal lobe) is responsible for the production of language (speaking and writing), while Wernicke’s area (in the temporal lobe) supports the comprehension of language (listening and reading). A large fibre tract (the arcuate fasciculus) connects these two ‘perisylvian’ areas (around the Sylvian fissure, the split which divides the two lobes).

“The classical view is largely wrong,” says Hagoort. Language is infinitely more complex than speaking or understanding single words, which is what the classical model was based on. While words are among the elementary ‘building blocks’ of language, we also need ‘operations’ to combine words into structured sentences, such as ‘the editor of the newspaper loved the article’. To understand and interpret such an utterance, knowing the speech sounds (or letters) and meaning of the individual words is not enough. For instance, we also need information about the context (who is the speaker?), the intonation (is the tone cynical?), and knowledge of the world (what does an editor do?). (1)

We believe thinking is complex.

And even when it is not, we make it be so.

The meaning of words depends on their context.

But going backwards, what was the first context of them all?

Go back and see within the darkness.

And you will see one word.

Uttered within perfect silence.

This is the substrate of it all.

(Silence)

Are you brave enough to listen to yourself?

Reading. Seeing. Seeing better!

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Reading is a recent invention in the history of human culture — too recent for dedicated brain networks to have evolved specifically for it. How, then, do we accomplish this remarkable feat? As we learn to read, a brain region known as the ‘visual word form area’ (VWFA) becomes sensitive to script (letters or characters). However, some have claimed that the development of this area takes up (and thus detrimentally affects) space that is otherwise available for processing culturally relevant objects such as faces, houses or tools.

An international research team led by Falk Huettig (MPI and Radboud University Nijmegen) and Alexis Hervais-Adelman (MPI and University of Zurich) set out to test the effect of reading on the brain’s visual system. If learning to read leads to ‘competition’ with other visual areas in the brain, readers should have different brain activation patterns from non-readers — and not just for letters, but also for faces, tools, or houses. ‘Recycling’ of brain networks when learning to read has previously been thought to negatively affect evolutionary old functions such as face processing. Huettig and Hervais-Adelman, however, hypothesized that reading, rather than negatively affecting brain responses to non-orthographic (non-letter) objects, may, conversely, result in increased brain responses to visual stimuli in general. (1)

Seeing. Reading. Learning.

In an inactive cosmos we are active.

Don’t be fooled by the super nova or the black holes colliding.

There is silence in the cosmos.

And we break that silence with our chatter.

Seeing. Seeing more. And then even more!

Learning to read in a cosmos which says nothing.

Nothing but the obvious…

Listen to your self while reading aloud.

He doesn’t truly say anything.

Except only when you stay silent and listen to him…

Why people suffer? – Call for philosophical essays

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Humans are averted to suffering. We do not wish to ache or cry.

Yet, life is full of pain.

Why?

Of what use is that pain?

How could good people suffer while others are spared the day? Is there a plan behind all this or are we just trying to discover meaning where there is nothing to find or say?

Send your essays to Harmonia Philosophica (harmoniaPhilosophica.com) and see them published in our portal. All submissions adhering to the submission requirements will be published, unless you wish not to.

Submission Requirements

  • Minimum length: 50 words.
  • Content: Submissions must be relative to the topic and have a philosophical flavor.
  • Publication indication: Please indicate explicitly in your submission whether you wish us to publish your essay and under what name (could be an alias). Essays that do not explicitly mention these publication details will not be published due to data protection regulations.
  • Deadline: December 2022.
  • Contact info: harmonia-philosophica@hotmail.com

Seek Harmonia Philosophica article ‘Why do good people suffer?‘ for inspiration.

Looking forward to your ideas!

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