Loving your brother…

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The sibling relationship is the longest most people will enjoy in their lifetimes and is central to the everyday lives of children. A Tel Aviv University and University of Haifa study found that relationships between children and their siblings with intellectual disabilities are more positive than those between typically developing siblings, with the children being more supportive to their brothers in the former (1).

Loving your brother because of a disability.

Loving your brother even if he has none.

Loving your enemy.

Loving the men who murder you.

We still lie at the bottom of the ladder to Heaven.

And we are so much thrilled by our progress, that we celebrate.

Instead of crying.

For there is no reason to love someone.

Unless you really hate him already…

Drawing. Seeing.

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Drawing an object and naming it engages the brain in similar ways, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. The finding demonstrates the importance of the visual processing system for producing drawings of an object.

In a study by Fan et al., healthy adults performed two tasks while the researchers recorded brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging: they identified pieces of furniture in pictures and produced drawings of those pieces of furniture. The researchers used machine learning to discover similar patterns of brain activity across both tasks within the occipital cortex, an area of the brain important for visual processing. This means people recruit the same neural representation of an object whether they are drawing it or seeing it. (1)

We think what we see.

We speak what we think.

Draw a line.

Contain the cosmos on a paper.

And you will remain speechless.

Do you see?

We think what we speak.

We see what we think…

But who drew the first line? Who thought of that first thought? Who spoke the first words?

In the midst of silence, can you listen to yourself?

Stop looking.

In the void of everything, can you see anything?

Measuring… (What?)

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A new optical atomic clock makes ultra-precise time measurements. (1)

Measuring time.

Even though we are not certain what time is.

You see, not knowing something does not hinder you from handling it.

But this goes even further than that.

Not knowing something is the sole pre-requisite of handling it.

Because if you knew it, there would be nothing to handle.

For in a cosmos where you know what time it…

You just stand by the river.

Without putting your feet in.

For there is no river…

For you have no feet…

For there is nothing flowing…

Just you.

Out of time.

Thinking.

Making the cosmos go around.

Can you feel time?

Can time feel you?

Mother. Child. Cosmos.

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Mothers’ and babies’ brains can work together as a ‘mega-network’ by synchronising brain waves when they interact. The level of connectivity of the brain waves varies according to the mum’s emotional state: when mothers express more positive emotions their brain becomes much more strongly connected with their baby’s brain. This may help the baby to learn and its brain to develop. (1)

Can you not feel my misery?

It is the same as my happiness.

Full of desire.

Mother.

Hold me.

I am here my child.

Why do you cry?

Love will never die.

But we will.

In the face of death…

Mother.

Can you laugh?

Recycling… Identity issues…

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The secret to a long life? For worms, a cellular recycling protein is key. Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that worms live longer lives if they produce excess levels of a protein, p62, which recognizes toxic cell proteins that are tagged for destruction. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, could help uncover treatments for age-related conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, which are often caused by accumulation of misfolded proteins.

“Research, including our own, has shown that lifespan can be extended by enhancing autophagy – the process cells use to degrade and recycle old, broken and damaged cell components”, says Malene Hansen, Ph.D., a professor in the Development, Aging and Regeneration Program at Sanford Burnham Prebys and senior author of the study. “Prior to this work, we understood that autophagy as a process was linked to aging, but the impact of p62, a selective autophagy protein, on longevity was unknown”. (1)

There you go.

Recycle old material and you will live longer.

But will that new ship built with new material be the same as the old ship which started the sail?

Will you recognize your mother when you get back home?

Questions we do not care about.

Because unfortunately modern man has chosen not to return home…

And on that new ship we set sails.

All into the dark sea.

Storm raging. Thunders and rain.

You believe these are obstacles toward your goal.

But they are just a calling back home…

Where our old ship is waiting.

To carry us where we need to go…

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