Robots. Seeing. Humans. Laughing.

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Humans have long been masters of dexterity, a skill that can largely be credited to the help of our eyes. Robots, meanwhile, are still catching up. Certainly there’s been some progress: for decades robots in controlled environments like assembly lines have been able to pick up the same object over and over again.

More recently, breakthroughs in computer vision have enabled robots to make basic distinctions between objects, but even then, they don’t truly understand objects’ shapes, so there’s little they can do after a quick pick-up.

In a new paper, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), say that they’ve made a key development in this area of work: a system that lets robots inspect random objects, and visually understand them enough to accomplish specific tasks without ever having seen them before. (1)

Touch that object in front of you.

It is not in front of you.

Is is not an «αντι-κείμενο» [En. “lying against you”] (Heidegger). It is part of you. You can never see or touch things which you don’t know. Feel it with your hand. This is not a table. This is your life. A glass of water. A cup of coffee. So tired. Children laughing. Calling you.

You are getting up now.

Going inside to play.

Leaving the table.

Now you don’t see it.

It never existed.

A children’s smile. Your smile. Everything gone…

Father. Mother. Cosmos…

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It was long thought that during an embryo’s first cell division, one spindle is responsible for segregating the embryo’s chromosomes into two cells. Scientists now show that there are actually two spindles, one for each set of parental chromosomes, meaning that the genetic information from each parent is kept apart throughout the first division. (1)

Molded in fire.

Opposites in constant war.

A cosmos in turmoil.

Look at that beautiful day.

There is a tornado behind it.

Father. Mother…

I can feel it…

How peaceful…

A universe in fire…

Metamorphosis.

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In the ocean off the coast of Antarctica, a snail lives around scorching hydrothermal vents. Its name is Gigantopelta chessoia. From the outside, it looks like any other shelled slug. But on the inside, something strange is happening, scientists report in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, like no metamorphosis ever observed in any other animal on the planet.

Once the snail reaches a certain body length, its digestive system stops growing. Its teeth, stomach and intestine make way for an expanding esophageal gland. The organ gets so big, it takes up most of the snail’s body, and basically becomes a new organ. Bacteria colonize it, and the snail, which grazed for food when it was smaller, no longer needs to eat. Instead it just sits there getting bigger, surviving on energy the bacteria produces inside the snail’s cells.

To make a human comparison, imagine growing from an average size adult to one 30 to 60 feet tall, with a giant sac of bacteria living inside you.

Not all animals eat. Some shallow water corals, for example, have algae living inside their tissues that take in sunlight and convert it to energy that provides the corals with nutrients. In the deep sea, there is no sun, but vents provide chemicals that bacteria break down. This is the basis of the deep-sea food chain. Gigantopelta chessoia, instead of algae, have bacteria living in some of their cells that convert hydrogen sulfide and oxygen the snails absorb from the vents into energy. (1)

It seems incredible.

But this is what happens to us as well.

Not with our body.

But with our mind.

We “eat” spiritually in our first four years of life.

And then we are set to go. Equipped with all we need.

Our beliefs…

Our prejudices…

Our character…

We are set up from our parents from our early years. And from that point onwards we never look back. We are bound by the things we do not think that bounds us.

Watch that baby grow.

Watch her go to school.

Watch her making friends.

Watch her driving for the first time.

She never left your arms…

She is still there…

Crying…

Smiling…

Hugging you…

Don’t be afraid to die.

Please dad don’t die!

You are not alone…

Smiling…

Mother! Don’t die!

She is calm now.

Remembering her dad…

Smiling…

Giving him that perfect little kiss on his nose…

And between those crying eyes…

The sweet fire of existence starts raging…

Noli timere…

Killing the child God within us… Modern mental problems…

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All children have moments of moodiness, but family medicine doctors and pediatricians may doubt their abilities to tell the difference between normal irritability and possibly bigger issues, according to Penn State researchers.

When the researchers interviewed a group of health care providers, they found that the primary care providers and pediatricians were less confident than the child and adolescent psychiatrists in their ability to tell whether irritability in young patients was normal or could be linked to a deeper mental health issues.

They also found that primary care providers and pediatricians were more likely to prescribe medications when they thought there was a problem, while psychiatrists were more likely to start with behavioral therapy. (1)

We have lost our connection with our self.

We have lost our memory of our child self.

Lost in the aeons of history, through the mist of oblivion. A kid is lost. In the dark caves, through the rough seas, his voice still echoes. We denied its existence. And now we pay the price. We ridiculed myths. Turned them into fairy tales. Annihilated them into scientific explanations. The umbilical cord is cut. And now the myths are claiming their toll on our souls.

We used to accept our nature.

Now we have identity issues.

We used to have visions.

Now we have mental problems.

Look at the lion kid. Listen to it roar.

Accept its nature. Run for your life!