Quantum computers: Meet my new computer. Different than the old computer…

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In theory, quantum computers can do anything that a classical computer can. In practice, however, the quantumness in a quantum computer makes it nearly impossible to efficiently run some of the most important classical algorithms.

The traditional grade-school method for multiplication requires n^2 steps, where n is the number of digits of the numbers you’re multiplying. For millennia, mathematicians believed there wasn’t a more efficient approach.

But in 1960 mathematician Anatoly Karatsuba found a faster way. His method involved splitting long numbers into shorter numbers. To multiply two eight-digit numbers, for example, you would first split each into two four-digit numbers, then split each of these into two-digit numbers. You then do some operations on all the two-digit numbers and reconstitute the results into a final product. For multiplication involving large numbers, the Karatsuba method takes far fewer steps than the grade-school method.

When a classical computer runs the Karatsuba method, it deletes information as it goes. For example, after it reconstitutes the two-digit numbers into four-digit numbers, it forgets the two-digit numbers. All it cares about is the four-digit numbers themselves. But quantum computers can’t shed (forget) information.

Quantum computers perform calculations by manipulating “qubits” which are entangled with one another. This entanglement is what gives quantum computers their massive power, but it is the same property that makes (made) it impossible for them to run some algorithms which classical computers can execute with ease. It was only until some years ago that Craig Gidney, a software engineer at Google AI Quantum in Santa Barbara, California, described a quantum version of the Karatsuba algorithm. (1)

Think. Forget. Move on. Think again…

Know everything.

And you will need to forget.

Forget so that you can learn.

So that you know it all.

The path to light, passes through alleys of darkness.

And trusting the light can only lead to darkness, when the Sun sets down.

You need the Moon.

For it is only there, that you can see your eyes reflected…

Upon the silvery calm lake…

Sun breathing fire.

Light reflected on the Moon…

Cold light reflected on water…

Light passing through your eyes.

In the dead of the night,

You realize that you knew the Sun.

Stand still enough…

And you will listen to the cosmos being born…

Forgetting… Not seeing… Burning bird…

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Forgetfulness and age-related memory lapses are a common complaint for many older adults, but what is still not understood is what causes these changes.

Recent research published by scientists at Baycrest’s Rotman Research Institute (RRI) brings us a step closer to uncovering the answer, which could help with distinguishing signs of dementia earlier.

The study, published in the journal Neuropsychologia, found that among older adults, there is a much weaker relationship between what their eyes see and their brain activity. (1)

See not.

And you will learn everything.

Learn not.

And you will forget nothing.

Empty brain.

Ready to accept it all.

Without accepting anything…

A light breeze.

Bird flying…

Singing…

Consumed by fire!

Forgetting who you are… One experience at a time…

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Researchers have revealed that infants aged 4- to 5-months already hold a primary cerebral representation of audiovisual integration of material information in their right hemisphere, and the number of types of material which can be processed by infants’ brain increases with the experience of the materials. This finding may lead to understand the trajectory of acquiring general knowledge about objects around us. (1)

The more you do something the more easily you can do it.

The more you breathe, the more easily you can breathe. The more you walk, the more easily you can walk. The more you experience the material cosmos, the more easily you can gain new experience of that cosmos.

But there is a catch in this gift. And Silenus will soon come to warn us. At the end, we will experience everything. But we will lose everything we could have without experiencing nothing. Like Midas, we will be rich. But we will die out of starvation…

Kids playing on the beach.

Happier than ever.

Dying a slow death…

One experience at a time…

Moon landing. Jesus resurrection. Stories told. Stories forgotten.

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We recently celebrated the 50 years anniversary of the moon landing. And yet, we saw many headlines of people speaking in favor of a conspiracy theory which wants the moon landing to be a hoax. I will not stand in the details of this funny conspiracy theory. What I will try to do is show how truth can easily be turned into a lie with only one key ingredient added to the recipe: time.

You see we went to the moon not so long ago, but the new generation is already questioning this. It could be for fun, it it could be due to stupidity, that doesn’t matter. What matters is that a story which was held true from one generation is now considered by make as false. An event which was considered the most important event man ever experienced, is now ridiculed by people who see obvious flaws in the story.

But many people went to the moon! one might argue.

Well, many people were resurrected as well.

But resurrection is a miracle, it defies natural laws! one might say.

So does s journey to the moon, for scientists who lived well before Armstrong. (remember that many years ago scientists didn’t even believe we could fly and after that they didn’t believe we could surpass the speed of sound limit)

But we will go again to the moon! one might say.

Sure we will. And many people will resurrect again! (or are they already? Check for NDE-related articles in Harmonia Philosophica)

But many people can testify that the moon landings happen! Well, I have a much better one: Many people DIED because the resurrection happened!

All in all, time along with the arrogance (we know better) and ignorance of newer generations, will always result in the manifestation of one of the major (brain) functions of the human intellect: forgetfulness. Nothing mysterious or fancy. No conspiracies or high-end philosophy. Just plain and raw dementia.

It takes courage to accept your limits. And recognize that what you might not remember could be something you once knew. Because in order to do that you must challenge your own self. Only because deep inside you can never doubt him…

Remembering. Electricity. Not asking the right questions.

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Direct electrical stimulation of the human amygdala, a region of the brain known to regulate memory and emotional behaviors, can enhance next-day recognition of images when applied immediately after the images are viewed, neuroscientists have found.

The results were published in PNAS.

The findings are the first example of electrical brain stimulation in humans giving a time-specific boost to memory lasting more than a few minutes, the scientists say. Patients’ recognition only increased for stimulated images, and not for control images presented in between the stimulated images. The experiments were conducted at Emory University Hospital in 14 epilepsy patients undergoing intracranial monitoring, an invasive procedure for the diagnosis of seizure origin, during which electrodes are introduced into the brain. (1)

We try to remember more.

And it seems that we will find a way to do it.

But why do we want to remember?

It seems that remembering is related to the brain. (surprise! surprise!) And it seems that it is also related to external stimuli, to the interaction with the environment via our senses. But who says that our senses work properly or that they provide any objective or “correct” view of the cosmos? Who says that what we want to keep remembering is something true – truer anyway than the things we imagine or think about?

Yes, you remember the image better now.

So? Do you feel wiser?

Try to forget everything.

What do you see?