What colour?

Advertisements
Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

What colour were fossil animals? Scientists have evaluated fossil color reconstruction methods and proposed a new study framework that improves and expands current practice. (1)

What a weird era.

Our knowledge gets accumulated in amazing rates.

And yet, we are still here.

Only knowing about us.

Yes, we know about the dinosaurs. But we will never know them the way we would if we lived with them. The only thing we can truly know is that we experience. And the only thing we experience is our self. Funny cosmos. We insist on looking outside. And yet, we can only know the inside. Overwhelmed by thousands and thousands of trivial important things. Whereas we ignore the most important trivial ones.

Look!

Science has discovered another species.

And we don’t even know what color it is…

It sounds inconsequential.

And, thus, the most significant thing we could ever know…

Past & Future… The link we do not see…

Advertisements
Photo by Cole Keister from Pexels

Ancient rocks provide clues to Earth’s early history: A research team has provided compelling evidence for significant ocean oxygenation before the GOE, on a larger scale and to greater depths than previously recognized. (1)

Looking for the past in rocks. Because we see the history as something solid. Written on stone. Fooled by the phenomena we are. Looking at the surface instead of the essence of things. Everything is interconnected. The past is as volatile as the future. There was a story once, of a Chinese high-ranking official who wanted to be an emperor. He never made it. It is said, that he did not make it because if he did, he would perform atrocious crimes as an emperor in the future. And his future came back to haunt his past. Funny story. As funny as the idea of someone affecting the future, but not being able to affect the past…

Look at you in the mirror.

Do you feel blessed? Do you feel haunted?

Are you that person you were ten years ago?

Look again at the mirror.

Ten years ago.

Did you feel you?

Did you remember yourself?

Sacred mountain. Unholy science.

Advertisements
Hawaii now and then… [Source]

A mountain which used to be sacred, is for many years now a place for science.

Following a protracted legal battle and years long protests that left a state deeply  divided, the Hawaii Supreme Court in November 2018 cleared the final legal hurdle for a $1.4 billion telescope project to resume construction atop the Big Island’s Mauna Kea, a mountain considered sacred by many Native Hawaiians. In a 4-1 ruling on Tuesday, the court upheld a 2017 decision by the state’s Board of Land and Natural Resources to grant a construction permit on Mauna Kea for the Thirty-Meter Telescope, better known as TMT.

The court said it had carefully considered the arguments put forth by the project’s opponents who’ve described the telescope’s construction as an attack on indigenous culture and a desecration of sacred land. But, per the ruling, it had ultimately determined that “astronomy and Native Hawaiian uses on Mauna Kea have co-existed for many years and the TMT Project will not curtail or restrict Native Hawaiian uses”.

The ruling also noted the telescope’s potential to “answer some of the most fundamental questions regarding our universe” – a benefit that won’t just be enjoyed by Native Hawaiians but all of humankind.

“We are not anti-science or astronomy,” Lanakila Manguil, an activist who’s been protesting against the TMT project for years, told HuffPost in 2017. “It’s about construction, development and industrial-sized work happening in conservation lands and particularly very sacred lands to our people.” The mountain, which measures about 32,000 feet from seafloor to summit, is home to burial sites and is where Native Hawaiians have been known to bury their umbilical cords as a way of connecting to the sacred land. (1)

In the old days we used to have sacred lands.

In the old days we used to walk on the land.

In the old days we used to dream of the stars.

Only because we believed we were part of them.

Now we want to look at them closely.

To observe and analyze them.

Now we do not have anything sacred.

Now we do not even believe in ourselves.

And we long so much to get out of that land.

And reach the stars.

Only because we believe we do not belong with them in the first place…

The past does die… Can you listen to it being born?

Advertisements
Lawrence Brooks [source]

Meet Lawrence Brooks.

The oldest WWII veteran aged 110, holding a photo of his younger self in the picture above.

He is oldest American WWII veteran and also the oldest living man in the United States. Born in September 12, 1909 (source).

Proud past.

Holding our present together.

But there is a dark secret behind it.

Because you see…

Light needs darkness to be born.

You see..

One day he will be gone.

Unfortunately…

One day we will forget.

One day…

The past will die.

Sadly.

It is the only way it can be reborn.

And in the midst of the most glorious peacful day…

While drawing its last silent breath…

The drums of War will start humming loud and clear far far away…

Exit mobile version
%%footer%%