Creating with style…

Advertisements
Photo by Matteo Badini from Pexels

In search of inspiration for improving computer-based text translators, researchers at Dartmouth College turned to the Bible for guidance. The result is an algorithm trained on various versions of the sacred texts that can convert written works into different styles for different audiences.

Internet tools to translate text between languages like English and Spanish are widely available. Creating style translators – tools that keep text in the same language but transform the style – have been much slower to emerge. The Dartmouth-led team saw in the Bible “a large, previously untapped dataset of aligned parallel text.” Beyond providing infinite inspiration, each version of the Bible contains more than 31,000 verses that the researchers used to produce over 1.5 million unique pairings of source and target verses for machine-learning training sets.

“The English-language Bible comes in many different written styles, making it the perfect source text to work with for style translation,” said Keith Carlson, a PhD student at Dartmouth and lead author of the research paper about the study.

As an added benefit for the research team, the Bible is already thoroughly indexed by the consistent use of book, chapter and verse numbers. The predictable organization of the text across versions eliminates the risk of alignment errors that could be caused by automatic methods of matching different versions of the same text.

“The Bible is a ‘divine’ data set to work with to study this task,” said Daniel Rockmore, a professor of computer science at Dartmouth and contributing author on the study. “Humans have been performing the task of organizing Bible texts for centuries, so we didn’t have to put our faith into less reliable alignment algorithms.” (1)

In the beginning there was Logos.

And we tried to express God with words.

We were bad at it in the beginning.

But gradually we learned.

To use words better.

To express ourselves.

To make art with lifeless marking on white paper.

And people read and wept.

And people believed and followed.

And people forgot.

And people became indifferent.

At the end, the markings on the paper were dead.

Being nothing more than sad reminders.

That we once upon a time were alive.

That we used to be part of God.

In the beginning there was Logos.

And we tried to express God with words.

We were so good at it in the beginning…

PS. Dartmouth College has a long history of innovation in computer science. The term “artificial intelligence” was coined at Dartmouth during a 1956 conference that created the AI research discipline. Other advancements include the design of BASIC – the first general-purpose and accessible programing language – and the Dartmouth Time-Sharing System that contributed to the modern-day operating system.

Thinking. Remembering. Being.

Advertisements
Photo by Tobias Bjørkli from Pexels

IBM researchers are developing a new computer architecture, better equipped to handle increased data loads from artificial intelligence. Their designs draw on concepts from the human brain and significantly outperform conventional computers in comparative studies. They reported on their findings in the Journal of Applied Physics, from AIP Publishing.

Today’s computers are built on the von Neumann architecture, developed in the 1940s. Von Neumann computing systems feature a central processer that executes logic and arithmetic, a memory unit, storage, and input and output devices. Unlike the stovepipe components in conventional computers, the authors propose that brain-inspired computers could have coexisting processing and memory units.

Abu Sebastian, an author on the paper, explained that executing certain computational tasks in the computer’s memory would increase the system’s efficiency and save energy. (1)

Thinking. Remembering.

Remembering. Thinking.

Within the dark forest, you think of the abyss.

Within the dark abyss, you remember of the forest.

Remember because you think.

Thinking because you remember.

Within the dark forest, you simply wander around.

Within the dark abyss, you just die and open your eyes.

Existing because you think of nothing…

Being only because you forget everything…

Remembering. Electricity. Not asking the right questions.

Advertisements

Direct electrical stimulation of the human amygdala, a region of the brain known to regulate memory and emotional behaviors, can enhance next-day recognition of images when applied immediately after the images are viewed, neuroscientists have found.

The results were published in PNAS.

The findings are the first example of electrical brain stimulation in humans giving a time-specific boost to memory lasting more than a few minutes, the scientists say. Patients’ recognition only increased for stimulated images, and not for control images presented in between the stimulated images. The experiments were conducted at Emory University Hospital in 14 epilepsy patients undergoing intracranial monitoring, an invasive procedure for the diagnosis of seizure origin, during which electrodes are introduced into the brain. (1)

We try to remember more.

And it seems that we will find a way to do it.

But why do we want to remember?

It seems that remembering is related to the brain. (surprise! surprise!) And it seems that it is also related to external stimuli, to the interaction with the environment via our senses. But who says that our senses work properly or that they provide any objective or “correct” view of the cosmos? Who says that what we want to keep remembering is something true – truer anyway than the things we imagine or think about?

Yes, you remember the image better now.

So? Do you feel wiser?

Try to forget everything.

What do you see?

Building memories…

Advertisements

You are more likely to remember something if you read it out loud, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.

A recent Waterloo study found that speaking text aloud helps to get words into long-term memory. Dubbed the “production effect,” the study determined that it is the dual action of speaking and hearing oneself that has the most beneficial impact on memory.

“This study confirms that learning and memory benefit from active involvement,” said Colin M. MacLeod, a professor and chair of the Department of Psychology at Waterloo, who co-authored the study with the lead author, post-doctoral fellow Noah Forrin. “When we add an active measure or a production element to a word, that word becomes more distinct in long-term memory, and hence more memorable”. (1)

But it’s not because you are more involved that you remember something better.

It is that you actually make it more real by getting more involved.

There is nothing to remember.

You shape reality every time you think about it.

But the memory stays inherently the same.

Changing costumes, putting on makeup, but…

It is still the same…

A dark face looking back…

Begging for attention since the day you were born…

Try to visualize yourself when you remember nothing.

It is only then that this person is you…

Remembering… Should we care?

Advertisements

How does heightened attention improve our mental capacity? This is the question tackled by a research, which reveals a chemical signal released across the brain in response to attention demanding or arousing situations. (1)

A brain wide chemical signal that enhances memory.

Seems a great solution.

But to which problem?

Are we meant to remember anything? Should we care about remembering something we have forgotten? Should we care about remembering at all anyway? Our life is here and now. And if you check philosophy most probably time does not even exist. Most probably most of the things we see and experience do not even exist as well – at least not in the way science believes they exist.

In a philosophically consistent world only you exist. In a philosophically consistent world the question if it good to remember things is mostly void of meaning.

Close your eyes and try to visualize your life.

What you want to remember is here with you.

Even if you don’t remember it.

Everything is you…