Reverse evolution

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The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. Instead, new research by behavioral scientists shows that in certain cases evolution works in the opposite direction, reversing individual improvements to benefit related members of the same group.

The research lead author David Fisher shows that the increased evolution of selfless traits – such as sharing food and keeping watch for one another – is mathematically equivalent to the decreased evolution of individually beneficial traits.

“On one side, traits evolve that benefit your kin, but don’t benefit you, because you’re helping your siblings or cousins. On the other side, traits that benefit you but cost your neighbors don’t evolve, because you’re causing damage to related individuals”, Fisher explains.

The work is part of the ongoing effort to understand the paradox of altruistic behavior in the wild, explains Fisher, a research fellow in McMaster’s Department of Psychology,Neuroscience and Behaviour. (1)

We seek evolution in all the wrong ways.

For true evolution is not about preserving life.

True evolution is about reaching death.

For only through death can we touch the essence of life.

And discover the meaning of existence.

Look at all those people living.

They know nothing about death.

And if not…

How can they know anything about life?

Wise men across the centuries sought not to preserve life.

But to remind us of death.

A death we have already experienced.

But that we choose to forget every day.

At the end, life and death do not matter.

Helping your self is helping others.

Helping others means helping yourself.

Look at your image in the mirror.

Can you clap with one hand?

Laugh.

Dance.

And the cosmos will die…

Can you feel the flowers grow?

Control. Life. Death.

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A recent study found out that older adults feel younger when they feel that they have more control over their daily lives, regardless of stress or health concerns. However, stress and health – not a sense of control – play a significant role in how old younger adults feel. (1)

Old people try to control life.

Because they feel it will end.

Young people not caring about controlling anything.

Because they believe they will live forever.

Funny.

For both they had what they seek.

But they lost it the moment they started seeking it.

Old people had control when they were still healthy and thought of everything except having control. Young men had health when they had still control and thought of everything except being healthy.

Think again for what you search for.

You will never find it ahead.

For it is already behind you.

Stop walking.

And think for a moment.

Why did you even start?

Stop listening to the music…

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How listening to music ‘significantly impairs’ creativity: The popular view that music enhances creativity has been challenged by researchers who say it has the oppositeeffect. Psychologists investigated the impact of background music on performance by presenting people with verbal insight problems that are believed to tap creativity. They found that background music ‘significantly impaired’ people’s ability to complete tasks testing verbal creativity – but there was no effect for background library noise. (1)

If you want to create music, you must stop listening to music…

If you want to write a great novel, never spend much time reading great novels…

Listen to the whispers in the wind.

If you want to understand them, just stop whispering yourself…

There is wisdom in the silence of the ocean…

But you must drown in it in order to hear it…

And only then will you be able to swim to the shore.

Stop listening to the music.

And your feet will start dancing…

The third eye… Light… Darkness…

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Just like land plants, algae use sunlight as an energy source. Many green algae actively move in the water; they can approach the light or move away from it. For this they use special sensors (photoreceptors) with which they perceive light.

The decades-long search for these light sensors led to a first success in 2002: Georg Nagel, at the time at Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt/M, and collaborators discovered and characterized two so-called channelrhodopsins in algae. These ion channels absorb light, then open up and transport ions. They were named after the visual pigments of humans and animals, the rhodopsins.

Now a third “eye” in algae is known: Researchers discovered a new light sensor with unexpected properties. The new photoreceptor is not activated by light but inhibited. It is a guanylyl cyclase which is an enzyme that synthesizes the important messenger cGMP. When exposed to light, cGMP production is severely reduced, leading to a reduced cGMP concentration – and that’s exactly what happens in the human eye as soon as the rhodopsins there absorb light. (1)

See too much light.

And your eyes will close.

It is darkness you seek.

So that your eyes open.

For only in the dead of the night, can you detect brightness…

Only there, standing alone in the complete absence of any source of light, can you realize that the only thing emitting light in this cosmos is you… And this knowledge will be the darkest knowledge you will ever have.

Cherish that knowledge.

And never seek light outside you.

If you do, you will find it.

And the whole cosmos will instantly fall into darkness…

Unsocial brain…

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Columbia scientists have identified a brain region that helps tell an animal when to attack an intruder and when to accept it into its home. This brain area, called CA2, is part of the hippocampus, a larger brain structure known to be critical for our memory of people, places, things and events.

CA2 was already known to specialize in social memory, the ability to remember encounters with others. Surprisingly, today’s findings reveal that a single brain region can control both higher-order cognition, like social memory, and an innate, instinctual behavior like social aggression. And because CA2 dysfunction has been implicated in psychiatric diseases, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, these results provide further support that altered CA2 function may contribute to abnormal social behaviors associated with such illnesses. (1)

I know you.

Thus, I kill you.

I love you.

Thus, I die for you.

I don’t care.

So at the end, we both die.

Why does always someone have to die in this scenario, as StarLord eloquently asked once upon a time? Well, the answer is simple. Because the moment you start looking into someone else you start questioning yourself. The moment you look into yourself, you start having doubt about you. At the end, the moment you (thought you) walked out of that cave, you started doubting its existence.

But the cave is there.

It is real.

And no, you don’t walk out of it.

You entered right into it…

Hey Plato!

Nice to know you.

You are dead…