Measuring laws…

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One of the fundamental physical constants, the ‘weak axial vector coupling constant’ (gA), has now been measured with very high precision for the first time. It is needed to explain nuclear fusion in the sun, to understand the formation of elements shortly after the Big Bang, or to understand important experiments in particle physics. With the help of sophisticated neutron experiments, the value of gA has now been determined with an accuracy of 0.04%. (1)

Trying to measure constants.

To formulate models.

Which need more constants.

Which we then have to measure.

Until we measure everything.

Until we have defined all constants.

What a stable world that would be.

Perfectly defined.

Perfectly modeled.

It is raining.

Let’s find shelter.

Come on.

And in that stable world.

A kid.

And in the fierce rain.

Takes a step forward.

Into the rain.

Laughing!

Ruining everything!

Reaching your potential…

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Having aspirations helps us navigate life in a meaningful and fulfilling way, but it can also cause psychological distress when hopes are left unfulfilled. New research has found that it’s not failing to make progress toward our ‘ideal-self’ that is problematic but rather the tendency to focus on that lack of progress in a negative way that leads to psychological distress. (1)

Humans trying to reach their potential.

But who dictates that potential?

And if you don’t reach your potential, wouldn’t that mean that this was your potential?

Humans. Constantly thinking.

Of what should be.

Of what could be.

Never their mind on where they are. What they are doing.

Watch yourself. Trying to walk. Trying to speak. Trying to think.

Think not any further.

This is your potential!

Walking upright (Missing home…)

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A paper published today in the Journal of Geology makes the case: Supernovae bombarded Earth with cosmic energy starting as many as 8 million years ago, with a peak some 2.6 million years ago, initiating an avalanche of electrons in the lower atmosphere and setting off a chain of events that feasibly ended with bipedal hominins such as Homo habilis, dubbed “handy man.”

The authors believe atmospheric ionization probably triggered an enormous upsurge in cloud-to-ground lightning strikes that ignited forest fires around the globe. These infernos could be one reason ancestors of Homo sapiens developed bipedalism — to adapt in savannas that replaced torched forests in northeast Africa.

“It is thought there was already some tendency for hominins to walk on two legs, even before this event,” said lead author Adrian Melott, professor emeritus of physics & astronomy at the University of Kansas. “But they were mainly adapted for climbing around in trees. After this conversion to savanna, they would much more often have to walk from one tree to another across the grassland, and so they become better at walking upright. They could see over the tops of grass and watch for predators. It’s thought this conversion to savanna contributed to bipedalism as it became more and more dominant in human ancestors.” (1)

And now we walk upright.

Traveling fast.

Running through the wild.

We will reach the stars one day.

Colonizing other galaxies.

And in the midst of enthusiasm…

No one will see us crying…

Longing for a home.

Dreaming of the days we were bound to earth.

Not able to go nowhere.

Because everywhere was already here…

Questions… Hiding the Answers…

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We keep on asking our selves how we can live forever.

We keep trying to find answers on deep philosophical questions for the meaning of life.

We insist on trying to find out what ‘reality’ is.

Only because we are afraid.

To admit that there are no answers to our questions.

We always knew that.

You see, the questions we pose are not here to reveal the answers.

But to conceal them.

For we knew the answers from the moment we thought the questions.

Questions that never existed anyway.

We thought of those questions.

In a void world full of nothing but existence.

How could there be answers to things we ourselves thought of?

Look at the calm lake.

The only reason you are asking so many questions about the waves on its surface.

Is because you want to hide.

The fact that your are the one disturbing its peace…

Oh, humans.

Gods.

Destroyers of the world…

If only you kept silent.

You would hear all the answers…

Inside the void that bred them.

Longevity. Xenon 124. Universe.

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Theory predicts the isotope’s radioactive decay has a half-life that surpasses the age of the universe “by many orders of magnitude,” but no evidence of the process has appeared until now.

An international team of physicists that includes three Rice University researchers – assistant professor Christopher Tunnell, visiting scientist Junji Naganoma and assistant research professor Petr Chaguine – have reported the first direct observation of two-neutrino double electron capture for xenon 124, the physical process by which it decays. Their paper appears this week in the journal Nature.

While most xenon isotopes have half-lives of less than 12 days, a few are thought to be exceptionally long-lived, and essentially stable. Xenon 124 is one of those, though researchers have estimated its half-life at 160 trillion years as it decays into tellurium 124. The universe is presumed to be merely 13 to 14 billion years old.

The new finding puts the half-life of Xenon 124 closer to 18 sextillion years. (For the record, that’s 18,000,000,000,000,000,000,000.) (1)

We look up to the universe.

We admire the cosmos in awe.

But the cosmos is nothing more than the shell.

What is in it, is important.

Even particles can outlive the universe.

What matters is what cannot.

One day we will discover how huge the cosmos really is.

One day we will know how tiny we actually are.

And only then, will we understand that we were wrong.

About how significant we are.

Especially because we are not…