True… False…

People are no better than chance at identifying when someone else is recounting a false or real memory of a crime, according to a new UCL study.

Study author Dr Julia Shaw (UCL Psychology & Language Sciences) said: “Everyone thinks that they couldn’t be tricked into believing they have done something they never did, and that if someone were telling them about a false memory, they would be able to spot it. But we found that actually, people tend to be quite susceptible to having false memories, and they sound just like real memories.” (1)

Lies disguised as truth.

Truth disguised as lies.

Funny.

At the end, what is true makes no difference.

As long as you believe it.

The power of the cosmos is raw.

And it is there.

To kill everything you love.

Accept it.

Suffer.

Better information. Worst decisions.

Making everyday decisions seems easy enough. But new research from Stevens Institute of Technology suggests that too much knowledge can lead people to make worse decisions, pointing to a critical gap in our understanding of how new information interacts with prior knowledge and beliefs.

Kleinberg and her team, found that when the problem was about something they were already familiar with (like finances and retirement, for example) people became less confident in their choices and made worse decisions, suggesting that their prior knowledge got in the way of choosing the best outcome. (1)

Arrogant man.

Let your instinct guide you.

Feel your feelings.

There is God inside everything you don’t know.

You have been wandering in this forest forever.

And within the mist of ignorance.

Beyond rivers you cannot see.

Beyond places you wished they’d never be.

You keep walking.

Knowing a clearing will soon come to thee.

Not because of what you know.

But especially because you have never seen one…

God. Angels. Particles. Lost.

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

A 2017 report of the discovery of a particular kind of Majorana fermion – the chiral Majorana fermion, referred to as the “angel particle” – is likely a false alarm, according to another research. Majorana fermions are enigmatic particles that act as their own antiparticle and were first hypothesized to exist in 1937. They are of immense interest to physicists because their unique properties could allow them to be used in the construction of a topological quantum computer. (1)

Seeking the God particle. Searching for the angel particle.

Trying to decode existence based on existence.

Trying to find particles in a cosmos full of particles.

Choosing the easy path.

Looking for answers in a place where we have already asked the questions…

Not seeing the tree… 

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Researchers have shown how it is possible that objects stand out less when they are surrounded by similar objects. This surroundings-suppressing effect is caused by feedback from higher visual brain areas. The results of this research are important for a better understanding of the way in which the brain transforms incoming light into a cohesive image. (1

Wasn’t it obvious? 

That what we do not see is obvious? 

Being part of a vast ocean. 

Isn’t it logical that you cannot see individual drops? 

Living in a universe being. 

Isn’t is reasonable that we cannot see consciousness? 

In the forest of obvious. 

Isn’t it obvious… 

That anything obvious is not? 

Watch out for what you do not see. 

It is the only thing you do! 

New force…

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Everything in our Universe is held together or pushed apart by four fundamental forces: gravity, electromagnetism, and two nuclear interactions. Physicists now think they’ve spotted the actions of a fifth physical force emerging from a helium atom.

It’s not the first time researchers claim to have caught a glimpse of it, either. A few years ago, they saw it in the decay of an isotope of beryllium. Now the same team has seen a second example of the mysterious force at play – and the particle they think is carrying it, which they’re calling X17.

The team seems to discover a new particle the characteristics of which suggested it had to be a completely new kind of fundamental boson. We currently know of four fundamental forces, and we know that three of them have bosons carrying their messages of attraction and repulsion.

This new boson couldn’t possibly be one of the particles carrying the four known forces, thanks to its distinctive mass of (17 megaelectronvolts, or about 33 times that of an electron), and tiny life span (of about 10 to the minus 14 seconds).

But physics isn’t keen on celebrating prematurely. Finding a new particle is always big news in physics, and warrants a lot of scrutiny. Not to mention repeated experiment. (1)

Humans lost in their quest for more knowledge.

New particles.

New forces.

New… whatever we know already.

Modern physics looks the cosmos through its own lenses. And interprets everything accordingly. When something is not in place, it seeks to fill in the puzzle with a new piece. And it searches for that new piece in – where else? – this things it already knows. So like a stupid uroborus ofis (Gr. Ουροβόρος όφις) it keeps on verifying itself by looking for answers back to… itself.

Don’t you see?

There is nothing which you see that you have not seen already…

And in the beginning you were blind.

It is just that we need a new Einstein to tell us so.

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