Worms… Deep below…

Advertisements
Photo by MOHAMED ABDELSADIG from Pexels

The sea bed in the deep ocean during the Cambrian period was thought to have been inhospitable to animal life because it lacked enough oxygen to sustain it.

But research published in the scientific journal Geology reveals the existence of fossilized worm tunnels dating back to the Cambrian period – 270 million years before the evolution of dinosaurs.

The discovery, by USask professor Brian Pratt, suggested that animal life in the sediment at that time was more widespread than previously thought.

The worm tunnels – borrows where worms lived and munched through the sediment – are invisible to the naked eye. But Pratt “had a hunch” and sliced the rocks and scanned them to see whether they revealed signs of ancient life. Pratt digitally enhanced images of the rock surfaces so he could examine them more closely. Only then did the hidden ‘superhighway’ of burrows made by several different sizes and types of prehistoric worm emerge in the rock. (1)

Under every rock you will find something.

Even when nothing is to be seen.

Worms, bacteria, microbes, viruses…

The cosmos is full of life.

We are not here as its culmination.

But as agents of death.

We are not standing at the peak of existence.

But we bear news of its end.

For only through death can the meaning of existence be revealed.

And it is our mission to reveal its meaning to anyone not able to grasp it.

Look at those bacteria.

Still alive.

So dead!

A Dead Girl. Kissed Lips. Life and Death.

Advertisements
Photo by Octoptimist from Pexels

Nobody knows what her name was. We don’t know her age or background. How her life brought her to Paris and left her drowned in the River Seine. But when her lifeless body was pulled from those murky waters in the late 19th century, the girl known forevermore as L’Inconnue de la Seine (the unknown woman of the Seine) began an amazing new story in death.

A story during which the girl became a spectacle of death. Inspiration to artists. Model for children’ toys. Cultural icon. And at the end a life-sized mannequin that people could use to practice life-saving techniques. (1)

A girl which lost her life, resulted in other lives saved.

A tragedy turned into art.

A girl transformed into icon.

Do you cry for Oedipus?

Do you feel sorry for Percival?

A light kiss.

Wishing good night.

The stars are high now.

The sun will rise.

A drop of tear.

Within the breeze.

Nothing.

The river will grow.

Into a tall lone tree.

And the closed lips will start talking again…

Alive! [Poetic terror]

Advertisements

Oh, terror!

Will I die?

Erased from the pages of existence?

Will I seize to be?

Breathless.

I can almost feel the darkness.

Flying in empty space.

Beyond the rings of Saturn.

I can almost listen to the whisper of silence.

Empty.

(Can anything be empty?)

Rays of light.

I can almost feel the warmth now.

Beyond the limits of myself.

I can listen to you.

Walking on bare ground.

Feeling the air.

Why am I here?

Treading on the paradoxical mist of nothingness.

Will I ever listen to you again?

Oh, terror!

I am alive!!!

Life. Existence. Quantum mechanics.

Advertisements
Photo by Rok Romih from Pexels

We’re a little closer to explaining life with quantum mechanics thanks to research carried out with an IBM supercomputer.

Encoding behaviours related to self-replication, mutation, interaction between individuals, and (inevitably) death, a quantum algorithm has been used to show that quantum computers can indeed mimic some of the patterns of biology in the real world. This is still an early proof-of-concept prototype, but it opens the door to diving further into the relationship between quantum mechanics and the origins of life.

The same principles governing quantum physics may even have had a role to play in forming our genetic code. (1)

Life is weird.

We are not sure what it is.

But we are sure it is something (good).

Death is weird.

We not sure what it is.

But we are sure it is something (bad).

But could both perceptions be wrong?

Look through the mirror of existence.

Life as a result of death.

Death as a result of life.

A cosmos balancing between existence and non-existence.

For Being is neither…

Once upon a time in Hollywood… [About Death]

Advertisements
Brad Pitt and Leo DiCaprio in a scene from “Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood,” directed by Quentin Tarantino. Photograph by Andrew Cooper / Sony Pictures

What does “Once upon a time in Hollywood” has to teach us? Nothing that life cannot teach us itself. The cynical nature of our existence. The void in which we experience the cosmos. The hope that we rely upon every night when we say good night: That we will wake up the next morning…

Too much?

Perhaps.

But this is life.

Full of surprises. Freud used to behave like that in the last years of his life. He treated every moment as his last, he even bid farewell to his friends every time they parted as if this was the last time he saw them. So much we are dazzled by life, that we tend to never think of death. And yet, death is here. Next to us. Ready to touch us.

Let me tell you a story, as Steve Mcqueen said in the film…

Once upon a time in Town X there was a man. That man was married. He had a baby boy. That man was happily married. He had a thriving business, a loving wife and a new child. One day that man held the baby in his arms and went down the stairs. He fell. The baby died. Depression set in. His wife divorced him. His business closed. Now that man is ruined. A shadow of his old self. And he is living a life of death ever since…

Too much?

Perhaps.

But this is life.

A true story.

One of many.

The same life was the life Sharon Tate used to have. Full and happy. She was married, she was successfull. She was waiting a child. Nothing could be better. She couldn’t wait to hold that baby in ther arms. And she would. But inside her grave…

For one night, she and four of her friends were murdered in the most gruesome way. And everyone was shocked. And everyone watched in awe. And Cielo Drive was indeed the way towards Heaven for her and those innocent lives that night took…

Too much?

Perhaps.

But this is life.

Do you dare look at it in the eyes? Do you dare accept death?

Sharon Tate once upon a time read the Tess of Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy. She even bought the book to her husband who later on made a film out of it. (There is a small scene in the Tarantino film that portrays that little detail) Funny that this excellent book talks about life’s tendency to have its own plans while you have your own…

Exactly as it happened to Tate.

Exactly as it happened to that man.

Too much?

Perhaps.

But this is life.

On an evening in the latter part of May a middle-aged man was walking homeward from Shaston to the village of Marlott, in the adjoining Vale of Blakemore, or Blackmoor. The pair of legs that carried him were rickety, and there was a bias in his gait which inclined him somewhat to the left of a straight line. He occasionally gave a smart nod, as if in confirmation of some opinion, though he was not thinking of anything in particular. An empty egg-basket was slung upon his arm, the nap of his hat was ruffled, a patch being quite worn away at its brim where his thumb came in taking it off. Presently he was met by an elderly parson astride on a gray mare, who, as he rode, hummed a wandering tune.

“Good night t’ee,” said the man with the basket.

“Good night, Sir John,” said the parson…