Gods. Playing…

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Image by Spiros Kakos

Humans trying to find the meaning of life.

Humans trying to understand existence.

Trying to decipher being.

Philosophers trying to understand change.

Physicists trying to define time.

Biologists trying to know life.

We were kids.
Trying to play.

But the game is no longer a game.
Angered by our failures to know.
Insisting to know more and more…

And understand.

And explain.

Failing to see our failures as answers as we did before…
About life and its meaning.
About existence and being.
About time and change.
There is nothing to know, but what we already knew.

Kids playing.

What reason is there to play?
No meaning.
No being.
No existence.
No time.
No change.
What reason is there to play?

Dear God.
Have I ever seen you pray?
Now I see.

(I am you)

Trying to understand.
Trying to know more.

Go on.

Ask the child.

How could you play with something that is not yours?

Explanatory note: We are the child. Not part of God, but God himself. Trying to play with the cosmos. Only because the cosmos is ours in the first place…

Worms… Deep below…

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Photo by MOHAMED ABDELSADIG from Pexels

The sea bed in the deep ocean during the Cambrian period was thought to have been inhospitable to animal life because it lacked enough oxygen to sustain it.

But research published in the scientific journal Geology reveals the existence of fossilized worm tunnels dating back to the Cambrian period – 270 million years before the evolution of dinosaurs.

The discovery, by USask professor Brian Pratt, suggested that animal life in the sediment at that time was more widespread than previously thought.

The worm tunnels – borrows where worms lived and munched through the sediment – are invisible to the naked eye. But Pratt “had a hunch” and sliced the rocks and scanned them to see whether they revealed signs of ancient life. Pratt digitally enhanced images of the rock surfaces so he could examine them more closely. Only then did the hidden ‘superhighway’ of burrows made by several different sizes and types of prehistoric worm emerge in the rock. (1)

Under every rock you will find something.

Even when nothing is to be seen.

Worms, bacteria, microbes, viruses…

The cosmos is full of life.

We are not here as its culmination.

But as agents of death.

We are not standing at the peak of existence.

But we bear news of its end.

For only through death can the meaning of existence be revealed.

And it is our mission to reveal its meaning to anyone not able to grasp it.

Look at those bacteria.

Still alive.

So dead!

Once upon a time in Hollywood… [About Death]

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Brad Pitt and Leo DiCaprio in a scene from “Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood,” directed by Quentin Tarantino. Photograph by Andrew Cooper / Sony Pictures

What does “Once upon a time in Hollywood” has to teach us? Nothing that life cannot teach us itself. The cynical nature of our existence. The void in which we experience the cosmos. The hope that we rely upon every night when we say good night: That we will wake up the next morning…

Too much?

Perhaps.

But this is life.

Full of surprises. Freud used to behave like that in the last years of his life. He treated every moment as his last, he even bid farewell to his friends every time they parted as if this was the last time he saw them. So much we are dazzled by life, that we tend to never think of death. And yet, death is here. Next to us. Ready to touch us.

Let me tell you a story, as Steve Mcqueen said in the film…

Once upon a time in Town X there was a man. That man was married. He had a baby boy. That man was happily married. He had a thriving business, a loving wife and a new child. One day that man held the baby in his arms and went down the stairs. He fell. The baby died. Depression set in. His wife divorced him. His business closed. Now that man is ruined. A shadow of his old self. And he is living a life of death ever since…

Too much?

Perhaps.

But this is life.

A true story.

One of many.

The same life was the life Sharon Tate used to have. Full and happy. She was married, she was successfull. She was waiting a child. Nothing could be better. She couldn’t wait to hold that baby in ther arms. And she would. But inside her grave…

For one night, she and four of her friends were murdered in the most gruesome way. And everyone was shocked. And everyone watched in awe. And Cielo Drive was indeed the way towards Heaven for her and those innocent lives that night took…

Too much?

Perhaps.

But this is life.

Do you dare look at it in the eyes? Do you dare accept death?

Sharon Tate once upon a time read the Tess of Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy. She even bought the book to her husband who later on made a film out of it. (There is a small scene in the Tarantino film that portrays that little detail) Funny that this excellent book talks about life’s tendency to have its own plans while you have your own…

Exactly as it happened to Tate.

Exactly as it happened to that man.

Too much?

Perhaps.

But this is life.

On an evening in the latter part of May a middle-aged man was walking homeward from Shaston to the village of Marlott, in the adjoining Vale of Blakemore, or Blackmoor. The pair of legs that carried him were rickety, and there was a bias in his gait which inclined him somewhat to the left of a straight line. He occasionally gave a smart nod, as if in confirmation of some opinion, though he was not thinking of anything in particular. An empty egg-basket was slung upon his arm, the nap of his hat was ruffled, a patch being quite worn away at its brim where his thumb came in taking it off. Presently he was met by an elderly parson astride on a gray mare, who, as he rode, hummed a wandering tune.

“Good night t’ee,” said the man with the basket.

“Good night, Sir John,” said the parson…

Understanding… nothing?

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Scientists using machine learning – a type of artificial intelligence – with data from hundreds of children who struggle at school, identified clusters of learning difficulties which did not match the previous diagnosis the children had been given. The researchers from the Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge say this reinforces the need for children to receive detailed assessments of their cognitive skills to identify the best type of support. (1)

When we try to understand something, we should always keep in mind the most important principle governing this futile process: that only the similar can understand the similar. There is nothing to see. Except a mirror.

Only humans can understand humans.

Only machines can understand machines.

Only a soulful being can truly grasp the meaning of the cosmos. Only a void human can ever give credit to what the void (an inanimate machine crunching meaningless data) has to say.

As Will Emerson said, most people do not stand on the edge of the balcony not because they might fall. But because they might jump…

Forgetting who you are… One experience at a time…

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Researchers have revealed that infants aged 4- to 5-months already hold a primary cerebral representation of audiovisual integration of material information in their right hemisphere, and the number of types of material which can be processed by infants’ brain increases with the experience of the materials. This finding may lead to understand the trajectory of acquiring general knowledge about objects around us. (1)

The more you do something the more easily you can do it.

The more you breathe, the more easily you can breathe. The more you walk, the more easily you can walk. The more you experience the material cosmos, the more easily you can gain new experience of that cosmos.

But there is a catch in this gift. And Silenus will soon come to warn us. At the end, we will experience everything. But we will lose everything we could have without experiencing nothing. Like Midas, we will be rich. But we will die out of starvation…

Kids playing on the beach.

Happier than ever.

Dying a slow death…

One experience at a time…