Move… Think… Dance…

Advertisements
Photo by Ray Bilcliff from Pexels

Boys with good motor skills are better problem-solvers than their less skillful peers, a study shows. In contrast to previous studies, the researchers found no association between aerobic fitness or overweight and obesity with cognitive function in boys. (1)

Moving into the dark forest.

Perceiving.

But do you move in order to perceive?

Or do you perceive because you move?

Stand still.

And you will see everything.

For the cosmos is not out there.

But inside you…

A man alone.

Dancing on the brink of existence.

Making the whole world go around…

Spatial thinking. Out of place…

Advertisements
Photo by Valdemaras D. from Pexels

It is one of the most fundamental questions in neuroscience: How do humans think? Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig, Germany, and the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience in Trondheim, Norway, among them Nobel prize laureate Edvard I. Moser, offer a new proposal published in journal Science: Humans think using their brain’s navigation system.

When we navigate our environment, two important cell types are active in our brain. Place cells in the hippocampus and grid cells in the neighboring entorhinal cortex form a circuit that allows orientation and navigation. The team of scientists suggests that our inner navigation system does much more. They propose that this system is also key to ‘thinking’, explaining why our knowledge seems to be organized in a spatial fashion.

“We believe that the brain stores information about our surroundings in so-called cognitive spaces (i.e. mental maps in which we arrange our experience). This concerns not only geographical data, but also relationships between objects and experience,” explains Christian Doeller, senior author of the paper and the new director at the MPI CBS. (1)

Thinking in a place.

Inside a forest.

Inside a room.

Inside a city.

Inside a family.

Inside a marriage.

Inside your… self.

Questioning yourself.

There is no marriage.

No family.

No city.

You are not sitting in a room.

Just walking in a forest.

Thinking of a place long gone.

Bleeding feet.

There is no such place.

But you will soon reach it.

At the moment you will forget about it…

Forgetting… Not seeing… Burning bird…

Advertisements
Photo by Alex Fu from Pexels

Forgetfulness and age-related memory lapses are a common complaint for many older adults, but what is still not understood is what causes these changes.

Recent research published by scientists at Baycrest’s Rotman Research Institute (RRI) brings us a step closer to uncovering the answer, which could help with distinguishing signs of dementia earlier.

The study, published in the journal Neuropsychologia, found that among older adults, there is a much weaker relationship between what their eyes see and their brain activity. (1)

See not.

And you will learn everything.

Learn not.

And you will forget nothing.

Empty brain.

Ready to accept it all.

Without accepting anything…

A light breeze.

Bird flying…

Singing…

Consumed by fire!

Boosting creativity.

Advertisements

What is creativity, and can it be enhanced – safely – in a person who needs a boost of imagination? Georgetown experts debate the growing use of electrical devices that stimulate brain tissue and conclude there is potential value in the technique. However, use of these machines also raises neuro-ethical, legal, and social issues that must now be addressed. (1)

Boosting creativity.

Because we feel we need to be creative.

Because we are creative.

And we can understand when we are not…

Sounds weird. But don’t all true things do?

Thrown into the cosmos.

Not being able to understand a thing.

Thus, being able to feel everything…

This is who we are.

Artists. Not thinkers.

Let your brain go. You don’t need any boost.

Because anyone who is able to give a boost, already has one…

Mindfulness.

Advertisements
Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Ever wonder why some people seem to feel less pain than others? A study conducted at Wake Forest School of Medicine may have found one of the answers — mindfulness. “Mindfulness is related to being aware of the present moment without too much emotional reaction or judgment,” said the study’s lead author, Fadel Zeidan, Ph.D., assistant professor of neurobiology and anatomy at the medical school, part of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. “We now know that some people are more mindful than others, and those people seemingly feel less pain.” (1)

Weird.

Focusing on the “now” makes you feel less pain, while the opposite would sound more logical.

And yet, what is “now” but the complete ignorance of everything else than existence itself?

There is nothing here NOW.

Not your senses. Not the others. Not even your own self. Nothing. Just you. Alone. Wandering in the forest of pure existence. Step into that river and everything will go away. Step into that river and suddenly things will start being as only inexistent things can ever be…

You do not “feel” pain.

You chose to make pain be…

And now all the universe is crying with you…