Do lizards dream like us?

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Do lizards dream like us? Researchers have confirmed that lizards exhibit two sleep states, just like humans, other mammals, and birds. They corroborated the conclusions of a 2016 study on the bearded dragon and conducted the same sleep investigation on another lizard, the Argentine tegu. Their findings nevertheless point out differences between species, which raises new questions about the origin of sleep states. (1)

Dull science. Making humans go to sleep again, as Wittgenstein postulated.

We should not care about how lizards dream. But what keeps us awake.

Dreaming of dragons. Breathing fire. And you will wake up terrified.

Stepping on the small lizard.

Ready to destroy the cosmos…

And give birth to nothingness which will breed chaos into the stagnant pool of existence…

Inadequate sleep. Inadequate perspectives.

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Inadequate sleep is a public health problem affecting more than one in three adults worldwide. A new study suggests that insufficient sleep could also have grave economic consequences. (1)

We feel bad for not sleeping.

Because if we don’t, then we can’t stay awake for long.

Once again blinded we are.

By our mania to see beyond what is in front of us.

Sleep now my child.

Not to get up. Forget about tomorrow.

I love you now.

Hug me.

Just sleep. Sleep…

Leibniz. Perception. Death. Existence.

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A paper bringing into light Leibniz’s general ideas concerning aesthetics, and then, due to the epistemological-psychological significance of sense perception in Leibniz’s philosophy, inquiring into it in detail and attempting to clarify the place of sense knowledge in human knowledge according to Leibniz. A paper venturing to divide Leibniz’s approach to sense qualities into objective and subjective aspects and investigating each separately. (1)

Perception. A very important problem indeed.

Hidden in the foundations of philosophy.

How does our perception differ from others?

How much “correct” our perception actually is?

How does our perception connect to reality?

A lot of people have argued and analyzed what Leibniz said and what he did not say regarding perception. (see for example Zhaolu Lu, “Leibniz’ theory of perception reconsidered” or Stephen Montague Puryear, PhD, “Perception and representation in Leibniz”, University of Pittsburgh, 2006) All these attempts to clarify the mystery of perception through the eyes of the great philosopher are common in making the same one important mistake: that we do not share the same eyes with Leibniz.

One could agree that…

“perception that is, the representation of the composite, or what is external, in the simple” (Ariew & Garber 1989: 207)

Or that…

“perception, which is the internal state of the monad representing external things” (Ariew & Garber 1989: 208).

The world is a magic place. Seeing it makes one believe we are into that world, wandering around like rats is an elaborate maze.

What if perception for you is not something simple? What if your own way of thinking is complex? Would that make your own perception of things not… true? What if we are all parts of the same“Monad” but have different ways of perceiving the ‘external’ things? What if there are no external things at all? What if everything is a representation of our perception? What if we create the things we believe we perceive?

And yet, one does not need to be in a maze to get confused.

Sitting in a chair in the safety of your living room. Being confused and mesmerized by things you think of. Getting confused. Analyzing the problems of your perception when there is no problem at all except one fundamental one: That you can perceive even without perceiving anything. With closed eyes. With no ears. With no sense of smell or taste.Without touching anything.

The greatest mystery is not how you perceive.

But the fact that you can perceive at all…

A shadow floating into existence.

Inside a dark void universe.

Experiencing Dasein. Dying.

Past the vast openness of nothing.

Beyond the realms of dreams.

Perceiving everything.

Only because there is nothing to perceive…

Memories. Waves. Brain. Immortal souls…

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Have you ever tried to recall something just before going to sleep and then wake up with the memory fresh in your mind? While we absorb so much information during the day consciously or unconsciously, it is during shut eye that a lot of facts are dispatched to be filed away or fall into oblivion.

The research team concentrated on a non-REM deep sleep phase (a.k.a. slow-wave sleep) that generally happens throughout the night, in alternation with the REM phase. During slow-wave sleep, groups of neurons firing at the same time generate brain waves with triple rhythms: slow oscillations, spindles, and ripples. Slow oscillations originate from neurons in the cerebral cortex. Spindles come from a structure of the brain called thalamic reticular nucleus and spike around 7-15 per second. Finally, ripples are sharp and quick bursts of electrical energy, produced within the hippocampus, a brain component with an important role in spatial memory.

Scientists believe that the correct timing of these three rhythms acts like a communication channel between different parts of the brains that facilitates memory consolidation.

Scientists at the Center for Cognition and Sociality, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), enhanced or reduced mouse memorization skills by modulating specific synchronized brain waves during deep sleep. The study showed that manipulating sleep spindle oscillations at the right timing affects memory. The full description of the mouse experiments, conducted in collaboration with the University of Tüebingen, is published in the journal Neuron. (1)

We want to help the storing of memories.

Because we believe memories are lost.

We want to create things.

Because we believe things are destroyed.

But nothing is ever lost.

And nothing is ever destroyed.

We must stop seeing death.

And we will enjoy eternal life…

Sleeping. Unlearning. Room to grow…

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Sleep research high-resolution images show how the brain resets during sleep: Striking electron microscope pictures from inside the brains of mice suggest what happens in our own brain every day: Our synapses (the junctions between nerve cells) grow strong and large during the stimulation of daytime, then shrink by nearly 20 percent while we sleep, creating room for more growth and learning the next day. (1)

Forget.

It’s the only way to learn…

Give room to ignorance.

So that knowledge can come in and flourish…