Playing itself…

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Scientists have created a nano-electronic circuit which vibrates without any external force. Just as a guitar string vibrates when plucked, the wire — 100,000 times thinner than a guitar string — vibrates when forced into motion by an oscillating voltage. The surprise came when they repeated the experiment without the forcing voltage. Under the right conditions, the wire oscillated of its own accord. The nano-guitar string was playing itself.

Lead researcher Dr Edward Laird of Lancaster University said: “It took us a while to work out what was causing the vibrations, but we eventually understood. In such a tiny device, it is important that an electrical current consists of individual electrons. The electrons hop one by one onto the wire, each giving it a small push. Usually these pushes are random, but we realised that when you control the parameters just right, they will synchronise and generate an oscillation.” (1)

“Under the right conditions”…

Hmmm…

I wonder if anything can ever happen under the WRONG ones…

Delusional we are. Believing in the non-existence.

This is the basis of our “knowledge”.

That something may NOT happen. That something is NOT possible.

And under the right conditions, we discover it can happen.

And under the right conditions, we discover it is possible…

Search your soul.

Nothing is impossible.

Except your innate ability to consider things impossible…

Denoting that nothing is!

Children. Adults. Lies.

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‘If you don’t behave, I’ll call the police,’ is a lie that parents might use to get their young children to behave. Parents’ lies elicit compliance in the short term, but a new psychology study suggests that they are associated with detrimental effects when the child becomes an adult. (1)

At the end, the truth will always come to light.

So don’t be afraid if it. Use it.

Lies will only breed lies.

Look at humans today. So engulfed in their need for life.

Trying to convince themselves that there is nothing more important.

And the quest for life creates what else but more thirst for life!

More thirst for sensing the cosmos.

More thirst for feeling the universe.

A deep urge to find other sources of life elsewhere!

And we will keep on going until we discover life everywhere!

At the end, we will behold a loving universe.

So beautiful.

So vibrant.

So true.

So perfectly wrong…

Question the obvious!

Only fake things are perfect.

Only illusions are so true.

There is ugliness in truth. For it is raw in nature. Killing anything which does not exist. And since nothing does, a loving cosmos cannot do anything but wrench the world in blood.

Do you dare sacrifice yourself?

Hey kid!

Who told you you were alive in the first place?

Understanding language. Word by word…

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The capacity for language is distinctly human. It allows us to communicate, learn things, create culture, and think better. Because of its complexity, scientists have long struggled to understand the neurobiology of language.

In the classical view, there are two major language areas in the left half of our brain. Broca’s area (in the frontal lobe) is responsible for the production of language (speaking and writing), while Wernicke’s area (in the temporal lobe) supports the comprehension of language (listening and reading). A large fibre tract (the arcuate fasciculus) connects these two ‘perisylvian’ areas (around the Sylvian fissure, the split which divides the two lobes).

“The classical view is largely wrong,” says Hagoort. Language is infinitely more complex than speaking or understanding single words, which is what the classical model was based on. While words are among the elementary ‘building blocks’ of language, we also need ‘operations’ to combine words into structured sentences, such as ‘the editor of the newspaper loved the article’. To understand and interpret such an utterance, knowing the speech sounds (or letters) and meaning of the individual words is not enough. For instance, we also need information about the context (who is the speaker?), the intonation (is the tone cynical?), and knowledge of the world (what does an editor do?). (1)

We believe thinking is complex.

And even when it is not, we make it be so.

The meaning of words depends on their context.

But going backwards, what was the first context of them all?

Go back and see within the darkness.

And you will see one word.

Uttered within perfect silence.

This is the substrate of it all.

(Silence)

Are you brave enough to listen to yourself?

Quantum cognition… Quantum cosmos… Classical humans…

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By examining our minds at a quantum level, we change them, and by changing them, we change the reality that shapes them. At least this is what the theory of quantum cognition says about what thinking is all about. (1)

A weird idea. But not less weird than quantum mechanics itself.

We constantly think.

And then think about what we think.

Watching the cosmos.

And changing it at the same time.

The first time we thought, we also thought about what we… thought!

Looking into the mirror, which reflected nothing more than us.

And what are we, than imperfect mirrors of the cosmos itself?

Empty your mind.

Think.

What are you thinking?

Why doesn’t any animal have three legs?

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If ‘Why?’ is the first question in science, ‘Why not?’ must be a close second. Sometimes it’s worth thinking about why something does not exist. Such as a truly three-legged animal. At least one researcher has been pondering the non-existence of tripeds.

“Almost all animals are bilateral,” he said. The code for having two sides to everything seems to have got embedded in our DNA very early in the evolution of life — perhaps before appendages like legs, fins or flippers even evolved. Once that trait for bilateral symmetry was baked in, it was hard to change.

With our built-in bias to two-handedness, it can be hard to figure out how a truly three-legged animal would work — although that has not stopped science fiction writers from imagining them. Perhaps trilateral life has evolved on Enceladus or Alpha Centauri (or Mars!) and has as much difficulty thinking about two-limbed locomotion as we do thinking about three.

This kind of thought experiment is useful for developing our ideas about evolution, Thomson said. (1)

How fascinating.

Everything started with Nothing.

Then One came into existence.

We are still in the phase of Two…

And there is no way to get any further.

For going further means that we get to three.

And from there infinity is one step away.

Leading to nothing more than zero once again…

But there is no infinity.

There is no two.

Not even One.

For only everything exists.

Infinity!

In the palm of a small kid…

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