Recycling… Identity issues…

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The secret to a long life? For worms, a cellular recycling protein is key. Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that worms live longer lives if they produce excess levels of a protein, p62, which recognizes toxic cell proteins that are tagged for destruction. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, could help uncover treatments for age-related conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, which are often caused by accumulation of misfolded proteins.

“Research, including our own, has shown that lifespan can be extended by enhancing autophagy – the process cells use to degrade and recycle old, broken and damaged cell components”, says Malene Hansen, Ph.D., a professor in the Development, Aging and Regeneration Program at Sanford Burnham Prebys and senior author of the study. “Prior to this work, we understood that autophagy as a process was linked to aging, but the impact of p62, a selective autophagy protein, on longevity was unknown”. (1)

There you go.

Recycle old material and you will live longer.

But will that new ship built with new material be the same as the old ship which started the sail?

Will you recognize your mother when you get back home?

Questions we do not care about.

Because unfortunately modern man has chosen not to return home…

And on that new ship we set sails.

All into the dark sea.

Storm raging. Thunders and rain.

You believe these are obstacles toward your goal.

But they are just a calling back home…

Where our old ship is waiting.

To carry us where we need to go…

Elusive motion… Only if still moving…

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In temperatures millions of times colder than interstellar space, researchers have performed the coldest reaction in the known universe. But that’s not all. In such intense cold, their molecules slowed to such glacial speeds, they could see something no one has been able to see before: the moment when two molecules meet to form two new molecules. In essence, they captured a chemical reaction in its most critical and elusive act. (1)

And so we captured motion.

So slow that it is barely visible.

And yet, still visible.

Could we slow down that motion even more?

Up to the point of having no motion at all?

Up to the point of having everything standing still?

Watch out for Achilles.

What you are really watching?

Flip the cosmos upside down.

And you will see it upside down!

A cosmos standing still.

A cosmos moving fast.

A cosmos warming up.

A cosmos moving faster.

The more it moves, the better you can see it moving.

Don’t you see?

Everything is more evident when it is more evident.

What if it stands still?

Can you see what you cannot see?

Dark AI… Dark humans…

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A study found that hiring algorithms are too opaque for us to understand if they are fair or not. (1) In other news, a scientist tried to help humans design algorithms that would never go the wrong way, doing harm rather than good, by implementing fail safes in their initial design (2)

We have started having kids.

And our main concern is to control them.

But there can be no control without love.

Unconditional love.

Leaving everything uncontrolled…

Let the river flow.

Leave the sea as it is.

And one day…

You will touch the water.

Let the waves carry you.

And one day…

You will swim!

Without moving an inch…

New force…

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Everything in our Universe is held together or pushed apart by four fundamental forces: gravity, electromagnetism, and two nuclear interactions. Physicists now think they’ve spotted the actions of a fifth physical force emerging from a helium atom.

It’s not the first time researchers claim to have caught a glimpse of it, either. A few years ago, they saw it in the decay of an isotope of beryllium. Now the same team has seen a second example of the mysterious force at play – and the particle they think is carrying it, which they’re calling X17.

The team seems to discover a new particle the characteristics of which suggested it had to be a completely new kind of fundamental boson. We currently know of four fundamental forces, and we know that three of them have bosons carrying their messages of attraction and repulsion.

This new boson couldn’t possibly be one of the particles carrying the four known forces, thanks to its distinctive mass of (17 megaelectronvolts, or about 33 times that of an electron), and tiny life span (of about 10 to the minus 14 seconds).

But physics isn’t keen on celebrating prematurely. Finding a new particle is always big news in physics, and warrants a lot of scrutiny. Not to mention repeated experiment. (1)

Humans lost in their quest for more knowledge.

New particles.

New forces.

New… whatever we know already.

Modern physics looks the cosmos through its own lenses. And interprets everything accordingly. When something is not in place, it seeks to fill in the puzzle with a new piece. And it searches for that new piece in – where else? – this things it already knows. So like a stupid uroborus ofis (Gr. Ουροβόρος όφις) it keeps on verifying itself by looking for answers back to… itself.

Don’t you see?

There is nothing which you see that you have not seen already…

And in the beginning you were blind.

It is just that we need a new Einstein to tell us so.

Benzene. Dimensions. Reality.

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Nearly 200 years after the molecule was discovered by Michael Faraday, researchers have finally revealed the complex electronic structure of benzene.

This not only settles a debate that has been raging since the 1930s, this step has important implications for the future development of opto-electronic materials, many of which are built on benzenes.

The atomic structure of benzene is pretty well understood. It’s a ring consisting of six carbon atoms, and six hydrogen atoms, one attached to each of the carbon atoms.

Where it gets extremely tricky is when we consider the molecule’s 42 electrons.

“The mathematical function that describes benzene’s electrons is 126-dimensional,” chemist Timothy Schmidt of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science and UNSW Sydney in Australia told ScienceAlert.

“That means it is a function of 126 coordinates, three for each of the 42 electrons. The electrons are not independent, so we cannot break this down into 42 independent three-dimensional functions. (1)

126 dimensions.

3 dimensions.

2 dimensions.

Does it matter?

Benzene is here. And so are you.

Roaming the cosmos.

In a thousand dimensions!

Listening to the rain.

In one single dimension.

Touching happiness.

In three dimensions.

Does it matter?

Are you defining dimensions?

Or are dimensions defining you?

As more dimensions reveal themselves, the more the cosmos will be extinct from one. And the more we see through the broken glass, the more we will ignore the fact that once upon a time, it was not broken.

Without 126 dimensions.

Without benzene.

Just you.

Ready to go home.

And discover benzene!

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