Playing itself…

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Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Scientists have created a nano-electronic circuit which vibrates without any external force. Just as a guitar string vibrates when plucked, the wire — 100,000 times thinner than a guitar string — vibrates when forced into motion by an oscillating voltage. The surprise came when they repeated the experiment without the forcing voltage. Under the right conditions, the wire oscillated of its own accord. The nano-guitar string was playing itself.

Lead researcher Dr Edward Laird of Lancaster University said: “It took us a while to work out what was causing the vibrations, but we eventually understood. In such a tiny device, it is important that an electrical current consists of individual electrons. The electrons hop one by one onto the wire, each giving it a small push. Usually these pushes are random, but we realised that when you control the parameters just right, they will synchronise and generate an oscillation.” (1)

“Under the right conditions”…

Hmmm…

I wonder if anything can ever happen under the WRONG ones…

Delusional we are. Believing in the non-existence.

This is the basis of our “knowledge”.

That something may NOT happen. That something is NOT possible.

And under the right conditions, we discover it can happen.

And under the right conditions, we discover it is possible…

Search your soul.

Nothing is impossible.

Except your innate ability to consider things impossible…

Denoting that nothing is!

Forcing people to enjoy (or dislike) music. Free will. As long as it is… free!

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Researchers from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University have proven it is possible to increase or decrease our enjoyment of music, and our craving for more of it, by enhancement or disruption of certain brain circuits.

In order to modulate the functioning of fronto-striatal circuits, the researchers from the lab of Robert Zatorre used a non-invasive brain stimulation technique, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which uses magnetic pulses to either stimulate or inhibit selected parts of the brain. In this case, the researchers applied TMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Brain imaging studies have shown that stimulation over this region modulates the functioning of fronto-striatal circuits, leading to the release of dopamine, a key neurotransmitter in reward processing.

The researchers found that, compared to the control session, liking of music, psychophysiological measures of emotion and participants’ motivation to buy music were all enhanced by excitatory TMS, while all of these measures were decreased by inhibitory TMS. (1)

Loving someone. Forcing him not to love someone.

Changing things.

Because if you change something then it will… change.

If someone loves someone and you change that then he will… not love her. That is obvious – a tautology. The point is: why care? Does that even mean anything? What do we want to demonstrate with that? We are what we choose to do. Not we are forced to do. Free will is free as long as it is… free.

The most difficult concepts to understand are the simple ones.

Decline in religion, decline in morality.

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Religious decline does not equal moral decline, says researcher. [1]

How original.

Stupid prejudiced science reaches to stupid prejudiced conclusions.

We must be careful to compare things with the same standards. Morality has not declined based on our standards now, because our standards have demised into a pulp of liberalism. But morality and ethics is not the pulp which exists inside the “progressive” heads of some atheists (a.k.a. subjective ethics based on the beliefs of every man – except Christians of course).

Ethics is the FOUNDATION of society for thousands of years.

And with shifting foundations only one thing can ultimately happen.

Collapse.

Do you feel the tremble?

No, it’s not your stomach…

…! (science saying nothing)

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Northwestern University professor Nina Kraus shed light on one of the brain’s most complex tasks – making sense of sound – during the recent Falling Walls conference in Berlin.

“The sounds of our lives change our brain”, said Kraus, an inventor, amateur musician and director of Northwestern’s Auditory Neuroscience Lab in the School of Communication. “In our lab, we investigate how our life in sound changes the brain, and how different forms of enrichment or decline influence how our brain processes sound”.

To measure the brain’s response to sound, researchers play speech or music directly into the ears of study volunteers. The scientists then measure the electricity created by the brain as it translates sound through sensors attached to participants’ heads. Results from a series of studies involving thousands of participants from birth to age 90 suggest that the brain’s ability to process sound is influenced by everything from playing music and learning a new language to aging, language disorders and hearing loss. (1)

So our ability to process sound is influenced by… everything…

Tautologies, through data analysis.

Another way of Science saying nothing.

Changes… Changes? [OR: Why science is a tautology?]

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Brain of astronauts changes while living in space. (1)

So deep…

Like saying that something changes when its environment… changes!

Wittgenstein said that mathematics were mere tautologies and conveyed no real message or knowledge.

Perhaps we should start thinking the same about sciences…

What is is.

And you will never know anything more…

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