Deep in the abyss… Do you feel wet?

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Does [a:] as in ‘baa’ sound greener or more red? And is [i:] as in ‘beet’ light or dark in color? Even though we perceive speech and color are perceived with different sensory organs, nearly everyone has an idea about what colors and vowels fit with each other. And a large number of us have a particular system for doing so. (1)

All senses are connected.

And at the end, they whisper the same thing…

Everything is One.

All interconnected.

So that there is no point in sensing anything no more…

Wet feet.

Don’t stand in the shore.

Dive deep.

And deep in the abyss.

You will not feel wet anymore…

Filling in memories…

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When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. Our brain often completes memories and automatically brings back to mind the different elements of the original experience. A new study now reveals the underlying mechanisms of this auto-complete function.

The researchers made an exciting discovery: During memory recall, neurons in the hippocampus fire strongly. Additionally, neurons in the entorhinal cortex began to fire in parallel to the hippocampus. According to one researcher “The act of remembering put neurons in a state that strongly resembles their activation during initial learning.” (1)

We know what we should see.

And we see it.

We know what we should smell.

And we smell it.

But we know nothing…

And yet…

What a lovely rose…

Dipped in the ocean of the moonlight.

Can you feel the breeze?

Isn’t it strange that you don’t miss the warmth of the sun?

Invisible table…

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Photo by Elizaveta Dushechkina from Pexels

Making objects invisible is no longer the stuff of fantasy but a fast-evolving science. ‘Invisibility cloaks’ using metamaterials now exist, and are beginning to be used to improve the performance of satellite antennas and sensors. Many of the proposed metamaterials, however, only work at limited wavelength ranges such as microwave frequencies.

Now, scientists report a way of making a cylinder invisible without a cloak for monochromatic illumination at optical frequency.

Scientists determined that invisibility would occur when the refractive index of the cylinder ranges from 2.7 to 3.8. Some useful natural materials fall within this range, such as silicon (Si), aluminum arsenide (AlAs) and germanium arsenide (GaAs), which are commonly used in semiconductor technology. By taking a close look at the magnetic field profiles, they inferred that “the invisibility stems from the cancellation of the dipoles generated in the cylinder.”

Although rigorous calculations of the scattering efficiency have so far only been possible for cylinders and spheres, Kajikawa notes there are plans to test other structures, but these would require much more computing power. (1)

A world full of things we see.

A world full of invisible things.

Right next to you, a table.

It is clearly there. Is it?

Deep inside yourself, you.

You do clearly exist, don’t you?

Extend your hand.

Funny.

When I touch this table,

it feels like it is touching me…

Colour where there is no colour… A cosmos where there is no cosmos…

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Engineers have found that under the right conditions, ordinary clear water droplets on a transparent surface can produce brilliant colors, without the addition of inks or dyes. By tuning size, illumination angle, and curvature, MIT engineers can produce brilliant colors, in patterns they can predict, in otherwise transparent droplets. (1)

Under the right angle, everything changes.

Look at a mountain from the sky and it will look like a tiny dot.

Look at a small chair from up-close and it will look like a mountain.

A colored cosmos. A cosmos in black and white.

At the end, it makes no difference.

Because the cosmos is nothing.

Until you start looking at it…

Open your eye.

Are you afraid of what you want to see?

See your face… Move your hand… Break the mirror…

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Given the limited capacity of our attention, we only process a small amount of the sights, sounds, and sensations that reach our senses at any given moment. Research suggests that certain stimuli – specifically, your own face – can influence how you respond without you being aware of it.

In an experiment, participants looked at a cross symbol displayed in the center of a computer screen while a picture of a face appeared on each side of the cross. The face on one side of the cross was the participant’s own face, while the face on the other side of the cross belonged to a stranger. The participants were told to focus their attention on the cross and ignore anything else that might appear.

The findings showed that participants automatically attended to their own faces when they appeared on screen, despite the fact that they were instructed not to do so. Importantly, the findings also showed that participants automatically attended to their own faces even when they weren’t aware of them. (1)

We know our self.

We sense our self.

Some only see their self.

Everywhere.

Even when we are told not to.

Yet, these people will not see what they look for.

For you need to look to others in order to see you.

Look closer.

They are not obstructing you from seeing better.

Instead, they provide the only window to yourself.

These are not ‘other’ people.

They are you.

You are them.

Mirrors of existence, mirroring what cannot exist.

Look at the mirror.

Move your hand.

No, the mirror does not reflect you.

You ARE the mirror…