This is deep…

A child passing next to a shallow pond of water at the edge of the street…

“This must be very deep”, it says to its parents as they walk together.

“You cannot see the bottom of it”, it says.

And I smiled as we walked.

Not at the child.

But at the arrogance of humans.

Who believe all those problems they have are so ‘deep’. Only because they cannot see the bottom of them.

Oh, stupid human.

How can you reach to an answer…

If the question was never there?

Expert decisions…

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Does a mass on a mammogram indicate breast cancer? Will Serbia be a member of the EU by 2025? Will there be more floods in Germany in five years’ time? The diagnoses and predictions made by doctors, scientists, and experts often have far-reaching consequences. And in many cases, it is only years later that it is possible to say which expert made the right call most often.

An interdisciplinary research team from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries has developed a simple new method that can be used to identify the best decision-makers from a group of experts without having to know whether their decisions — past or present — are correct or incorrect. “Providing that at least half of all decisions made within the group are correct — which is typically the case in expert groups — and that each person has made about 20 yes/no decisions, this method has proved to work very well,” says Max Wolf, researcher at the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries and co-author of the study.

The method was developed on the basis of insights into collective intelligence. It rests on a simple assumption: Those individuals in a group of experts who make decisions that are most similar to the decisions of others also make the best decisions. For yes/no decisions, this assumption is easily confirmed by means of mathematical modeling. To test whether the method also works in real groups, the researchers analyzed published predictions and diagnoses made by various groups in different fields. (1)

Great method. Which also seems to work.

But should we trust it?

Be aware of the things which work.

Decisions of most people tend to be correct. But from when do “most of the people” reach the correct decision on any of the great philosophical questions? The truth is never revealed to the many. For even if that seems so now, at the end you will see that the path was wrong.

We strive for live.

We are afraid of death.

And yet…

What is life?

What is death?

Trust not the many but the one man standing aside the crowd silent.

It is there that you will find the truth screaming…

Harsh sounds…

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Neuroscientists have analyzed how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant. Their results showed that the conventional sound-processing circuit is activated but that the cortical and sub-cortical areas involved in the processing of salience and aversion are also solicited. This explains why the brain goes into a state of alert on hearing this type of sound. (1)

We used to live in Paradise.

Afraid of nothing.

Then we learned new things.

And fear is in our soul ever since.

We used to listen to everything.

Standing alone in the forest, being afraid of nothing.

But we couldn’t bear the silence. And we closed our ears.

Destroyed the forest and started listening closely.

Of the footsteps approaching.

Within the safety of love.

We are afraid of our self…

Shhhh…

Are you brave enough to look down to your own feet on the dirt?

What is Being? A child’s answer…

“What is Being?” – “It is a word” (!) [A child’s answer to the greatest philosophical question]

Once I asked a child what Being is…

(Once I asked my self what Being is…)

And the child answered…

“It is just a word dad”

(And I laughed…)

And my dad was impressed…

And the whole world of philosophy kept on going…

Trying to figure out what Being is.

“What exists?” – “That which we have named…”

Changed self. Life. Acting. Loving.

Photo by Ekaterina from Pexels

When thinking about the future, some people think they will change, and others expect they might remain the same. But, how do these predictions relate to happiness later on in their lives? According to new research from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), expecting ourselves to remain mostly the same over the next ten years is strongly related to being happier later in life. The research is published in Social Psychological and Personality Science.

One would assume that if people make optimistic predictions about the future, such as “thinking they will become more compassionate and intelligent in the future,” as Joseph Reiff (UCLA) suggests, “they would end up becoming happier in the years that follow.” What Reiff and colleagues found however, surprised them.

“The more people initially predicted that they would remain the same — whether predicting less decline or less improvement across a number of core traits — the more satisfied they typically were with their lives ten years later,” says Reiff. (1)

We have idolized change.

But can anything change?

Whatever you do you will always be you.

Unless you choose not to.

But even then, this is you.

Trying to be someone else.

Life as a theater play. And we are all actors. Others perform well, others not so much. But only a handful of us remember that at the end of the play, we will retreat backstage and go back home again…

Only a handful or us remember that the play is not important…

Hello daughter! I’ve been waiting for you…

It was a terrible play dad.

I didn’t watch it. Come. Dinner is on the table…

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