Engraved symbols. Long gone. Deep into our heart…

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Photo by Bisesh Gurung from Pexels

Engraved stone artifacts are important clues to the history of human culture and cognition. Incisions on the cortex (soft outer layer) of flint or chert flakes are known from Middle and Lower Paleolithic sites across Europe and the Middle East. However, it can be difficult to determine the action that created an incision: was it an accidental scrape or purposeful engraving? To address this issue, Majkic and colleagues created an interpretive framework that allows researchers to classify the structure and patterns of engraved cortexes and cross-check these attributes with a list of possible causal actions.

They tested this methodology with an engraved flake from the cave site of Kiik-Koba in Crimea. The many stone artifacts at the site are associated with Neanderthal remains and date to around 35,000 years ago. Following microscopic examination of the grooved lines on the flint cortex, the researchers concluded that the incisions represent deliberate engravings that would have required fine motor skills and attention to detail. These engravings appear to have been made with symbolic or communicative intent.

If this interpretation is correct, this engraved flake would join a growing list of signs that Neanderthals engaged in symbolic activities, along with evidence of intentional burial, personal ornaments, and other decorated objects. This has implications for the question of when and how many times this sort of cultural expression has evolved among hominin populations. The researchers hope to hone their framework further for use with artifacts of varying ages and cultural contexts. (1)

Old symbols.

But not dead ones.

Lingering still inside us.

Engraved into our very souls.

No need for any analysis or interpretation. Just look within yourself. Every part of you is governed by primate instincts. Every thought you have stems from an otherworldly need of belonging. Belonging to something bigger than you. Something shared with all other humans and with the universe itself.

Long before you were born…

You used to be alive.

Part of everything.

Enclosing everything…

Try to remember.

You were primitive back then.

Not yet cursed with knowledge…

A raw untamed river. Carving its way through the stone…

Viking warriors… Women warriors…

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Viking warriors have a historical reputation as tough guys, with an emphasis on testosterone. But scientists about a year ago said that DNA had unveiled a Viking warrior woman who was previously found in a roughly 1,000-year-old grave in Sweden. Until then, many researchers assumed that “she” was a “he” buried with a set of weapons and related paraphernalia worthy of a high-ranking military officer.

If the woman was in fact a warrior, a team led by archaeologist Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson of Uppsala University in Sweden has identified the first female Viking to have participated in what was long considered a male pursuit. (1)

People may be startled to see a woman as a Viking warrior.

Let alone seeing her as a leading warrior in an important battle.

And yet, the most important battle of all is with our self.

A battle fought every day, with grim odds of winning it.

Because our self is relentless and powerful.

Knowing all our secrets and weapons of war.

Only a woman can give this battle. Only a woman can be emotional enough to get into the battle and strong enough to finish it without losing herself. Because women are creators. Creators of life, able to withstand pain of levels impossible for someone who focuses on the self. Small gods, living among us but without ever seeking acknowledgement.

Look closely at the battle field. No, not there were men slaughter each other and strong cries of pain tear through the air. Look further away. Back in the homes of these brave men. There is a woman waiting Ulysses. And a fierce battle raging. A silent battle.

Look into her eye.

And you will see Zeus fighting Cronus under the shadows of Ouranos…

Hitler & Swastika: The murder of a symbol…

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Hitler did not only murder people. He also murdered a symbol.

Swastika was for thousands of years a symbol of the movement of the cosmos, a symbol of good luck.

Now no one can use it anymore. Now the world has stopped turning.

Dark deeds have dark consequences…

Can someone be brave enough? The world must start moving again…