Earth’s core. Human souls.

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A new study could help us understand how our planet was formed. Scientists report that their research shows that Earth’s inner core is solid – a finding made possible by a new method for detecting shear waves, or ‘J waves’ in the inner core. (1)

We believe that pressure creates solids.

That diamonds are the hardest material on Earth.

But the hearts of humans are made out of thin air.

Soft, airy and non-binding. Light and flexible.

Dare not to underestimate them.

Cause it is these humans who are the core of Earth.

Those humans giving diamonds their shinning.

Those humans making the Earth move in the vast space.

This was not always like this.

In the beginning this was a lonely inanimate planet.

Full of diamonds.

Full of growing trees

Full of flying bees.

Until someone discarded than diamond in the dirt…

Until someone saw that tree falling…

Until someone cried for that bee dying…

And the cosmos exploded into thin air…

Knowing things…

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By focusing on nervous system circuits of nociception, the body’s sensing of tissue damage, anesthesiologists can achieve unconsciousness in patients using less drug and manage post-operative pain better, leading to less need for opioids. (1)

We don’t know what consciousness is.

Yet, we know when we do not have it.

We can’t say what a soul is.

But we all feel we have one.

Look out for the things you cannot know.

They are the only ones which are worth knowing…

Built from glass…

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Ever wondered how groups of cells managed to build your tissues and organs while you were just an embryo? Using state-of-the-art techniques he developed, UC Santa Barbara researcher Otger Campàs and his group have cracked this longstanding mystery, revealing the astonishing innerworkings of how embryos are physically constructed.

Cells coordinate by exchanging biochemical signals, but they also hold to and push on each other to build the body structures we need to live, such as the eyes, lungs and heart. And, as it turns out, sculpting the embryo is not far from glass molding or 3D printing. In their new work,”A fluid-to-solid jamming transition underlies vertebrate body axis elongation,” published in the journal Nature, Campàs and colleagues reveal that cell collectives switch from fluid to solid states in a controlled manner to build the vertebrate embryo, in a way similar to how we mold glass into vases or 3D print our favorite items. Or, if you like, we 3D print ourselves, from the inside. (1)

In a world of change…

Crumbling mountains.

Rising oceans.

In a world of chaos, life.

Made out of nothing.

Fragile and yet…

Lasting eternally.

Melting glass…

Solid stone…

What lies beyond the veil of nothingness?

A universe made out of dust.

An undying cosmos.

Look at the melting glass. It is not sad.

For it knows that this is not the end.

But the beginning…

A flash.

Instant photo.

A smile.

Frozen in time.

A tear dropping.

My soul…

Sensing… Not sensing… Being…

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Engineers have created an electronic ‘skin’ in an effort to restore a real sense of touch for amputees using prosthetics. (1)

We have senses.

We lose senses.

We improve senses.

We regain senses.

And at no point do we ever stop to wander.

That what can so easily change.

Cannot truly exist after all…

In the blistering Sun.

Or in the deep-freezing cold.

In the raging winds of a storm.

Or in the peace of noon siesta.

The abyss stands still.

A beggar seeks help…

Give him a hand.

He is you.

Engraved symbols. Long gone. Deep into our heart…

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Engraved stone artifacts are important clues to the history of human culture and cognition. Incisions on the cortex (soft outer layer) of flint or chert flakes are known from Middle and Lower Paleolithic sites across Europe and the Middle East. However, it can be difficult to determine the action that created an incision: was it an accidental scrape or purposeful engraving? To address this issue, Majkic and colleagues created an interpretive framework that allows researchers to classify the structure and patterns of engraved cortexes and cross-check these attributes with a list of possible causal actions.

They tested this methodology with an engraved flake from the cave site of Kiik-Koba in Crimea. The many stone artifacts at the site are associated with Neanderthal remains and date to around 35,000 years ago. Following microscopic examination of the grooved lines on the flint cortex, the researchers concluded that the incisions represent deliberate engravings that would have required fine motor skills and attention to detail. These engravings appear to have been made with symbolic or communicative intent.

If this interpretation is correct, this engraved flake would join a growing list of signs that Neanderthals engaged in symbolic activities, along with evidence of intentional burial, personal ornaments, and other decorated objects. This has implications for the question of when and how many times this sort of cultural expression has evolved among hominin populations. The researchers hope to hone their framework further for use with artifacts of varying ages and cultural contexts. (1)

Old symbols.

But not dead ones.

Lingering still inside us.

Engraved into our very souls.

No need for any analysis or interpretation. Just look within yourself. Every part of you is governed by primate instincts. Every thought you have stems from an otherworldly need of belonging. Belonging to something bigger than you. Something shared with all other humans and with the universe itself.

Long before you were born…

You used to be alive.

Part of everything.

Enclosing everything…

Try to remember.

You were primitive back then.

Not yet cursed with knowledge…

A raw untamed river. Carving its way through the stone…