Blurry images…

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

The ghost imaging technique forms an image by correlating a beam that interacts with the object and a reference beam that does not. Individually, the beams don’t carry any meaningful information about the object. The imaging technique works with visible light, x-rays and other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum and, when the structured light beams are generated computationally with spatial light modulators, can be performed with a low-cost single-pixel detector instead of a complex, expensive camera.

To apply ghost imaging to moving objects, the new method uses a small number of light patterns to capture the position and trajectory of the object. The researchers developed an algorithm to cross correlate this positional information with blurred images captured at different positions, allowing a clear image to be gradually formed. (1)

Looking at a blurry image.

Making it clearer with time.

The more you know, the more clear it gets.

But no matter how much we clear the initially blurry picture.

The fact will remain that when you first looked at it…

The picture WAS blurry…

And what is important is not that you saw it at the end.

But that you wanted to anyway see through it even though you saw nothing…

Do you get it now?

It is you who painted the picture.

Eternal river… For ever changing…

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Ancient Egyptians considered the Nile river to be the source of all life. The steady northward path of the river has nourished the fertile valleys of northeast Africa for millions of years and in doing so, shaped the course of human civilization.

The Nile’s unchanging path, however, has been a geologic mystery because long-lived rivers usually move over time. Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have cracked the case by linking the river’s flow to the movement of rock in the Earth’s deep mantle. In the course of their investigation, they found the eternal river to be much older than anyone realized, with the scientists estimating the age of the Nile to be 30 million years — about six times as long as previously thought. (1)

Behold the eternal river.

Behold the temporary life.

Heraclitus was right.

You can never step into it twice.

But not because the river is changing.

But because you are…

Get into that river.

And see yourself.

Floating away…

Away from the river.

To a shore where there is nothing but a tree.

Walk to that tree.

But eat not from its fruits.

Can you hear a river nearby?

Moving… Thinking of moving… Standing still!

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) work on the principle that measurable changes in electrical brain activity occur just by thinking about performing a task. Signals can be read, evaluated, and then converted into control signals via a machine learning system, which can then be used to operate a computer or a prosthesis. In a recently published study, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences Leipzig, the Public University of Navarre, and TU Berlin demonstrated that after just one hour’s training with a BCI significant changes could be detected in test subjects’ brains, meaning that training with the BCI also has direct repercussions on the neuronal structure and function of the brain. (1)

Move.

And you will change.

Think of moving.

And you will change.

We are so much consumed by our faith in reality that we cannot see the obvious.

We are too consumed looking up to reality and trying to comprehend it…

That we cannot see that reality is looking upon us to determine where it will go next…

Move.

And the cosmos will start moving.

Don’t you see?

Achilles will never reach the turtle.

It is the turtle which wants to be reached…

Adapting…

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Researchers tried to assess the effect of a new road to the local turtle populations.

“It turns out that turtles liked to hang out (a lot) in fun places like thick patches of greenbrier and multiflora rose,” says Weigand, one of the researchers. “Overall, we found that turtles at both roadless and roadside sites used similar habitats, with high volumes of downed woody debris and thick understory, so our initial hypothesis that the bypass was affecting how turtles selected habitat was not validated”.

However, the researchers discovered something rather puzzling — while many turtles used the open roadside habitat created by the new highway for thermoregulation and nesting, no turtles attempted to cross the road. (1)

We like to run. To things! To run!

And because of that we need to run more! And more!

And adapt! And do more things!

And run! And…

Well, you get the meaning.

But here we are.

Still here.

And all this time…

A turtle was looking at us in amazement…

“Poor rabbit, why do you run so hard?”

Don’t you know that at the end the turtle will win?

Please now.

Stop running.

Come. Come.

Cut my nails please…

Harmonia Philosophical is dead. Long live Harmonia Philosophica!

Photo by Spiros Kakos (Kakia Lagada, Kythera)

Harmonia Philosophica exists for more than a decade now. There has been many years since it had a major revamp, but the time had finally come.

And just like that, everything changed.

New template that is more lean and modern. The old template was an old favourite one, but all things die at some point.

(And that adds more to the love we have for them)

New type of posts. From now on the articles will be of a more poetic type without any specific link to a news or scientific discovery article that they comments on. Anyway we had always been advocates of the irrational, so why stick to writing articles about something in such an ordinary way? (Of course posts already scheduled will be posted as scheduled)

(What is the point of writing with logic if you are to sound logical?)

Every moment all things change.

Every moment we change.

And yet, we stay the same.

There is nothing closer to eternity than the ephemeral…

Harmonia Philosophica is dead!

Long live Harmonia Philosophica!

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