Seeing beyond what you see…

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With a new photo-analyzing computer program, a photographer can take a picture of something that’s not even in frame.

The system analyzes light that’s reflected off matte surfaces, such as walls, to discern out-of-sight images, similar to the way a periscope mirror reveals what’s around a corner. Whereas other techniques for spotting out-of-sight objects require expensive, specialist optical equipment (SN: 1/9/16, p. 15), the new program can render a rough, full-color reconstruction of a hidden scene using a single snapshot captured with an ordinary digital camera.

Electrical engineer Vivek Goyal and colleagues at Boston University tested their system by displaying images on an LCD monitor facing a wall. In between the two, the researchers placed an object that blocked some of the light emanating from the monitor, casting shadows on the wall. (In this case, Goyal’s team used a rectangular panel, but an obscuring object of any size or shape would do.)

Both the light that reaches the wall and the shadowing created by the intervening object contain clues about the LCD display. And the program is able to reconstruct the image with very good accuracy. (1)

Seeing beyond what we can see.

That is the only way to see that we do not see nothing else but… everything.

The cosmos is One. Casting shadows everywhere.

Take a close look and you will see the light.

In the shadow of that bird.

In the shadow of the child playing.

Your whole life is a shadow.

Cast by being under the false sun of existence…

Take a close look and you will see the light.

Not outside of the shadow.

But in it…

Yawning…

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By studying the phenomenon of contagious yawning, the researchers learned that people’s reactions in virtual reality (VR) can be quite different from what they are in actual reality. They found that contagious yawning happens in VR, but people’s tendency to suppress yawns when they have company or feel they’re being watched don’t apply in the VR environment. Further, when people immersed in VR are aware of an actual person in the room, they do stifle their yawns. Actual reality supersedes virtual reality. (1)

Reality…

What an overrated word.

We grow up worshiping it.

But without knowing why.

What is real?

What is not?

Fundamental questions we fail to answer.

And yet we are driven by them every day.

Reality…

It is not the cosmos calling us.

It is us calling at the cosmos…

In an empty world…

The only thing we worship without knowing why.

And, because of that, the only thing worth worshiping…

Reality…

It is…

Yawn…

Draw… you.

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It’s the archetypal child’s drawing – family, pet, maybe a house and garden, and the child themselves. Yet, how do children represent themselves in their drawings, and does this representation alter according to who will look at the picture? A research found that children’s expressive drawings of themselves vary according to the authority of and familiarity with the adult who will view the picture. (1)

Drawing the cosmos.

Drawing your mother.

Drawing your father.

But do you know… you?

The hardest things to draw are the ones we know the most. Because the essence of things lies not on the outside. But on the things which are left unseen. Any line on paper will not reveal more about who you are. But it will obscure the true self that lies beneath the veil of existence.

Blank paper.

A tear staining the white surface.

Empty circles.

Can you smile?

Can you see the cosmos behind the lines?

When? Where? (Why?)

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In a UCI study, participants sat with their heads inside a high-resolution fMRI scanner while watching a TV show and then viewing still frames from the episode, one at a time.

The researchers found that when subjects had more precise answers to questions about what time certain events occurred, they activated a brain network involving the lateral entorhinal cortex and the perirhinal cortex. The team had previously shown that these regions, which surround the hippocampus, are associated with memories of objects or items but not their spatial location.

“Space and time have always been intricately linked, and the common wisdom in our field was that the mechanisms involved in one probably supported the other as well,” added Maria Montchal, a graduate student in Yassa’s lab who led the research. “But our results suggest otherwise.” (1)

Trying to remember then when.

Without caring about the where.

But nothing of these matters.

Because no matter how precisely we recall where or when something happened in the vast dark forest of existence, we will still not be able to answer a much more fundamental question: How did we get in that forest in the first place?

In a cosmos with time, there is no forest.

Nothing but a constantly changing set of beings.

Changing to show that there is nothing to change.

What a weird cosmos…

In a world of change, time has meaning.

But in a world of change nothing is real.

Feel the breeze…

Without any trees to linger in the air…

Time cannot flow.

And without a breeze blowing between the trees…

There are no trees.

Feel the breeze…

Don’t try to explain.

Just…

Feel the breeze…

The third eye… Light… Darkness…

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Just like land plants, algae use sunlight as an energy source. Many green algae actively move in the water; they can approach the light or move away from it. For this they use special sensors (photoreceptors) with which they perceive light.

The decades-long search for these light sensors led to a first success in 2002: Georg Nagel, at the time at Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt/M, and collaborators discovered and characterized two so-called channelrhodopsins in algae. These ion channels absorb light, then open up and transport ions. They were named after the visual pigments of humans and animals, the rhodopsins.

Now a third “eye” in algae is known: Researchers discovered a new light sensor with unexpected properties. The new photoreceptor is not activated by light but inhibited. It is a guanylyl cyclase which is an enzyme that synthesizes the important messenger cGMP. When exposed to light, cGMP production is severely reduced, leading to a reduced cGMP concentration – and that’s exactly what happens in the human eye as soon as the rhodopsins there absorb light. (1)

See too much light.

And your eyes will close.

It is darkness you seek.

So that your eyes open.

For only in the dead of the night, can you detect brightness…

Only there, standing alone in the complete absence of any source of light, can you realize that the only thing emitting light in this cosmos is you… And this knowledge will be the darkest knowledge you will ever have.

Cherish that knowledge.

And never seek light outside you.

If you do, you will find it.

And the whole cosmos will instantly fall into darkness…