The apple…

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The apple.

A mysterious fruit, once symbolizing all fruits and being synonym to evil. Playing a significant role in many stories in the mythologies of many people and in Christianity as well. From the apples of Hesperides and the apple with which Paris started the Trojan War, to the apple for which the ghost of Aristotle talked about while dying, to the apple which made God cast us away from Paradise, to Newton’s apple and to the apple of Turing, to the apple used in folk proverbs, [1] [2] [3] the apple continues to try to remind us of something which we have forgotten.

But what could that be?

What do all these stories want to tell us exactly?

Apples are now the subject of genetic experiments. [4] And they seem to be the link between ancient fruits and modern fruits, carrying a larger genome than any other fruit. [5]

Only the fools read the myths as if they are fairy tales. We do not know when all these myths mean and what is it that the apply symbolizes, but that just means that we must intensify our efforts to remember what we have forgotten.

Keep searching.

I would already be dead…

if it wasn’t for the smell of that apple…

Meditation. Compassion. Ancient knowledge, long gone…

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Mounting evidence of the impact of contemplative practices like meditation (which we now know can, quite literally, rewire the brain) are finally bringing modern science up to speed with ancient wisdom.

Mindfulness and compassion — the practices of cultivating a focused awareness on the present moment, and extending a loving awareness to others — are part of every religion and wisdom tradition, and we’re at last beginning to understand the profound impact that they have on the brain, says psychiatrist and mindfulness expert Dr. Dan Siegel. (1)

Try to remember.
Try to go back.

Back to an era where you did not “understand”.
But you did know.

Back to an era where you did not analyze the cosmos into pieces.
But you did see the whole as One.

Back to an era where you were more “primitive”.
But more wise in any sense…

Ancient China can slide! But how?!?

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Fifteenth-century Chinese engineers didn’t so much reinvent the wheel as dispense with it altogether – opting to drag heavy stones for building the Forbidden City along a slippery artificial ice road instead of wheeling them.

That, at least, is the upshot of the latest analysis of a 17th-century Chinese text. Such a method would be 10 times as efficient as dragging the rocks along non-icy ground – suggesting that Chinese engineers had a more sophisticated understanding of friction than their Western counterparts at that time. (1)

We tend to believe primitive people were… primitive. We tend to think that old people had… old ideas and did not know of “new” things. Nothing more dangerous than a definition tautology which propagates through the centruries…