Counting. Playing music.

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Photo by Rafael Serafim from Pexels

Bees can solve seemingly clever counting tasks with very small numbers of nerve cells in their brains, according to researchers. (1)

Scientists have developed a 3D-printed robotic hand which can play simple musical phrases on the piano by just moving its wrist. (2)

Everyone feeling so important when counting. But every animal can do it. Even bees. And what makes us special is that we may choose not to count even though we can. Everyone feeling so amazed when seeing a robot playing the piano. And yet we are not important because we play music, but because we may choose not to and listen to the silence instead.

In the future the world will be full of bees and robots.

Buzzing through chattering humans.

Playing the piano between soundless men.

But within the dreaded noisy night, a child will suddenly stay silent.

And under the scorching midday sun, an old man will stop to listen…

Beyond the robots playing perfectly…

Past the bees counting seamlessly…

Looking at the cosmos.

Crying, for it is so full and perfect.

Laughing, for it is so flawlessly dead…

Learning…

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Photo by Rok Romih from Pexels

In order to learn about the world, an animal needs to do more than just pay attention to its surroundings. It also needs to learn which sights, sounds and sensations in its environment are the most important and monitor how the importance of those details change over time. Yet how humans and other animals track those details has remained a mystery.

Now, Stanford biologists report in Science, they think they’ve figured out how animals sort through the details. A part of the brain called the paraventricular thalamus, or PVT, serves as a kind of gatekeeper, making sure that the brain identifies and tracks the most salient details of a situation.

The results are a surprise, Chen said, in part because few had suspected the thalamus could do something so sophisticated. “We showed thalamic cells play a very important role in keeping track of the behavioral significance of stimuli, which nobody had done before”, said Chen, who is also a member of Stanford Bio-X and the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute. (1)

Trying to learn how we learn.

Blind to the truth behind the veil of existence.

Lifeless puppets.

Strings attached.

There is nothing to learn.

Void cosmos.

Filled with fire.

Burning the strings.

Bringing death.

So that Being can emerge…

Starving to death…

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Octopuses are fascinating creatures with incredible problem-solving skills and breathtaking camouflage. But overall, they are short-lived, typically around for just one to two years. That’s because they’re semelparous, which means they reproduce just once before they die.

Once an octopuse mother lays her eggs, she stops feeding – she’ll stay and watch over her eggs until they hatch, slowly starving to death. In captivity, towards the end, sometimes she’ll tear off her own skin, and eat the tips of her own tentacles.

Now, scientists have figured figured out why this grim scenario happens. It has to do with the optic gland between the octopus’s eyes; a gland similar to the pituitary gland in humans.

In 1977, researchers removed this gland and found that the octopus’ mothering instincts disappeared. She abandoned her eggs, started feeding again, and went on to live a much longer life. The maturation of the reproductive organs appears to be driven by secretions from the optic gland. These same secretions, it seems, inactivate the digestive and salivary glands, which leads to the octopus starving to death. (1)

Octopuses. Giving birth. Dying.

Humans. Giving birth. Dying.

Gods. Giving birth. Dying.

A cosmos starving to death.

For it needs to be.

That was always the case.

Not death after life.

But life after death…

The last white rhino…

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Rhino embryos made in lab to save nearly extinct subspecies. The development is an early step toward the much more distant goal of resurrecting the northern white rhinoceros, whose last male died this year. (1)

Being the last of your kind.

A sad moment. A lonely moment.

Those eyes. Full of lust for life.

In the face of death, longing for some more moments of existence. (Humans want to resurrect them now) And yet, they fail to see that they were never more alive. In that last gaze… (Humans will eventually die. And let the rhinos be)

Instability… Randomness… Out of design…

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A study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University has brought science one step closer to a molecular-level understanding of how patterns form in living tissue. The researchers engineered bacteria that, when incubated and grown, exhibited stochastic Turing patterns: a “lawn” of synthesized bacteria in a petri dish fluoresced an irregular pattern of red polka dots on a field of green.

Researchers showed that the stochastic Turing model is driven by randomness. In the study, scientists demonstrated both experimentally and theoretically that Turing patterns do in fact occur in living tissues – but with a twist. Where the instability that generates the patterns in Turing’s model is defined as a high diffusion ratio between two chemicals, an activator and an inhibitor, in this study, researchers demonstrate that it’s actually randomness – which would in most experiments be considered background noise – that generates what Goldenfeld has coined a stochastic Turing pattern. (1)

Trying to design bacteria.

So that they are unstable.

And they generate stable patterns…

Chaos births Order.

In the same way Order generates Chaos.

The world is One.

Moving in circles.

Every single moment.

Circles around itself.

Circles around an invisible point of nothingness.

Containing everything and nothing at the same time.

Watch these tigers waiting behind the bushes.

No, they are not trying to hide behind the trees.

They are the trees…