Who wrote what? It matters not.

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The 17th century playwright Molière is as important to French literature as William Shakespeare is to the English canon. But for the past 100 years, a question has swirled around him: Did Molière really write his plays? Or was Pierre Corneille, another famous French playwright of the time, the true author? A new study uses computational methods to analyze subtle, unconscious elements of both authors’ writing and concludes that Molière did indeed write the plays attributed to him. (1)

But does it matter who wrote what?

In the old days people did not care about signing their works with their own name.

For what mattered, was what they wrote.

Go on.

Write down your name.

Do you see?

You are not you!

You are Homer.

You are Nietzsche.

You are Shestov.

You are me.

You are you.

You are No-one!

Attributing art. Understanding art. Making art?!

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AI used to analyze and attribute art. (1)

Computers analyzing art.

Categorizing it. Attributing it.

Computers understanding art.

Computers destroying art.

Only because they understood it.

While it is not meant to be understood.

But can’t you see?

This means that they didn’t understand it after all!

Weird cosmos.

Full of people. Full of computers.

Humans creating art.

Computers understanding it!

How nonsensical.

How dull.

How awfully… artistic!

Death miniature 2: The school bus

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

[Death miniatures series stories]

Death miniatures are fictional ultra-small stories related to death. The goal is to draw out emotions and make the reader think more about death, which is the only thing that we keep on avoiding, even though it is defining our life and behavior from the moment we are born till the day we draw our last breath…

He was waiting for the school bus with his daughter.

She laughed and played around.

Giggling and smiling.

(Oh, how much he wanted that bus to be late…)

Oh, how lovely she was.

Happy days.

Now how daughter was in her 50s.

And as he held her tight in his arms, he was now ready to die.

And in his last breath, he was there again.

One cold morning.

With his daughter. Laughing and smiling. Giggling and playing.

Happy.

Waiting for the school bus.

A tear…

(Oh, the bus was here now…)

~

Death stories series

Death miniature: The toy…

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

[Death miniatures series stories]

Death miniatures are fictional ultra-small stories related to death. The goal is to draw out emotions and make the reader think more about death, which is the only thing that we keep on avoiding, even though it is defining our life and behavior from the moment we are born till the day we draw our last breath…

She always loved this toy.

From the moment that she saw it she could never sleep without it.

She would be so happy now.

Holding it in her small little hands.

A small fluffy octopus with seven arms.

We had laughed so much with that.

Look at her now.

With the sevenctopus again in her tiny arms…

A touch on my shoulder.

It was time.

I gave her a kiss.

(Sleep tight my child)

The tears rising.

But as the coffin was closing…

I could still see the toy.

And for a moment.

Without knowing why or how.

I just smiled.

(Oh, she loves this toy!)

~

Death stories series

Creative AI… Dull humans…

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In October 2018, a portrait of Edmond Belamy sold at Christie’s in New York for $432,500, nearly 45 times its maximum estimated price. Nothing that out of the ordinary, perhaps. Except Belamy didn’t exist. He was the fictitious product of the artist’smind – and the mind that created him wasn’t even human.

Signed in the corner by a formula that is part of the algorithm that created it, the portrait was the first artwork made by artificial intelligence brought to auction. There have been many similar seeming breakthroughs in AI creativity. In 2017, an AI wrote a continuation of the Harry Potter books by using machine learning to analyse the first seven volumes of J. K. Rowling’s output. The music for US singer Taryn Southern’s 2018 album I AM AI was bigged up as having been composed and produced entirely by machines. Back in 2016, SACEM, a French professional association in charge of artists’ rights, was the first to acknowledge an algorithm, the Artificial Intelligence Virtual Artist or AIVA, as a composer.

It fits into a common theme that anything we can do, AI can do – and probably better. But it is worth looking under the hood of all these creative outputs to understand how much the machines really are doing, and how much is just hype. Answering the question of whether AI can be creative isn’t easy – and raises fundamental questions about the nature and origins of human creativity. (1)

How exquisite.

At the end, computers will understand art.

At the end, AI will create genuine art.

And we will see it.

And we will understand it.

And only then will we understand that there is no art.

Without someone not understanding it…

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