Behavior. Molecules. Defining a human…

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The immune system affects – and even controls – social behavior, a new study has found. Researchers discovered that blocking a single type of immune molecule made mouse brains go hyperactive and caused abnormal behavior; restoring it fixed both. The discovery could have enormous implications for neurological conditions such as autism and schizophrenia. (1)

It is not our behavior which makes us who we are. It is something else.

Something not controlled by molecules. Something not controlled by us at all. It is our very existence which defines us. And existing means doing nothing. Just Being.

Imagine. Can you hold still?

Bacteria mind games…

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By tinkering with the gut’s bacterial residents, scientists have changed the behavior of lab animals and small numbers of people. Microbial meddling has turned anxious mice bold and shy mice social. Rats inoculated with bacteria from depressed people develop signs of depression themselves. And small studies of people suggest that eating specific kinds of bacteria may change brain activity and ease anxiety. Because gut bacteria can make the very chemicals that brain cells use to communicate, the idea makes a certain amount of sense. Though preliminary, such results suggest that the right bacteria in your gut could brighten mood and perhaps even combat pernicious mental disorders including anxiety and depression. The wrong microbes, however, might lead in a darker direction. (1)

We are part of a larger ecosystem.

Everything affecting everything.

We do not think on our own.

Other beings “think” for us as we do for other beings as well.

Accept that and you will become the wisest man ever…

Let go.

Let the cosmos guide you into crying.

Let yourself guide the cosmos into laughter.

They are not your tears.

It is your laughter.

Fear. Behaviour. Fear. Behaviour.

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A team of CSHL scientists have discovered a new neural circuit in the brain that directly links the site of fear memory with an area of the brainstem that controls behavior. Far-reaching neurons in the central amygdala, the location of fear memory in the brain seen here in red (right), directly contact neurons in the brainstem, here in green (left). (1)

Fear controls our behaviour.

But we control fear.
So we control our behaviour.

But some are afraid of controlling their behaviour.
But they can control this fear.

But…

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