Worms… Deep below…

Advertisements
Photo by MOHAMED ABDELSADIG from Pexels

The sea bed in the deep ocean during the Cambrian period was thought to have been inhospitable to animal life because it lacked enough oxygen to sustain it.

But research published in the scientific journal Geology reveals the existence of fossilized worm tunnels dating back to the Cambrian period – 270 million years before the evolution of dinosaurs.

The discovery, by USask professor Brian Pratt, suggested that animal life in the sediment at that time was more widespread than previously thought.

The worm tunnels – borrows where worms lived and munched through the sediment – are invisible to the naked eye. But Pratt “had a hunch” and sliced the rocks and scanned them to see whether they revealed signs of ancient life. Pratt digitally enhanced images of the rock surfaces so he could examine them more closely. Only then did the hidden ‘superhighway’ of burrows made by several different sizes and types of prehistoric worm emerge in the rock. (1)

Under every rock you will find something.

Even when nothing is to be seen.

Worms, bacteria, microbes, viruses…

The cosmos is full of life.

We are not here as its culmination.

But as agents of death.

We are not standing at the peak of existence.

But we bear news of its end.

For only through death can the meaning of existence be revealed.

And it is our mission to reveal its meaning to anyone not able to grasp it.

Look at those bacteria.

Still alive.

So dead!

Regenerate.

Advertisements
Photo by Mathias P.R. Reding from Pexels

New study reveals regeneration of amputated body parts is not always an ancient trait and scientists might need to rethink the way they compare animals with regenerative abilities. An international group of researchers including biologists from the University of Maryland found that at least four species of marine ribbon worms independently recently evolved the ability to regrow a head after amputation. This new study, which was published in the March 6, 2019 issue of Proceedings of the Royal Society B, turns that assumption on its head. In a survey of 35 species of marine ribbon worms, the researchers found that the ability to regenerate an entire head, including a brain, evolved relatively recently in four different species. “This means that when we compare animal groups we cannot assume that similarities in their ability to regenerate are old and reflect shared ancestry,” said Alexandra Bely, associate professor of biology at UMD and one of the study’s authors. “We need to be more careful when comparing regeneration findings across different groups of animals.” “The ancestor of this group of worms is inferred to have been unable to regenerate a head, but four separate groups subsequently evolved the ability to do so,” Bely said. “One of these origins is inferred to have occurred just 10 to 15 million years ago.” (1)

Regeneration.

We believe it is the culmination of miracles

But even worms can do it.

Humans on the other hand do not seek completion.

But imperfection.

For only a broken tree, can ever reach the ground.

Seek your strength in your weakness.

Find the meaning of life in its absurdness.

Pull off your eyes. (Democritus)

Seek death. (Socrates)

Ignore this life. (Christ)

And you will gain a place in another.

Where worms cannot grow heads.

Where worms die.

Where humans live without living…

This is not fantasy.

But what worms teach us every day.

This is the miracle you never understood.

The miracle you will never comprehend.

Because you seek miracles.

And the greatest miracle that exists…

Is that there are none…

Self-navigation…

Advertisements
Photo by Jeffrey Czum from Pexels

Human eyes are insensitive to polarized light and ultraviolet radiation, but that is not the case for ants, who use it to locate themselves in space. Cataglyphis desert ants in particular can cover several hundreds of meters in direct sunlight in the desert to find food, then return in a straight line to the nest, without getting lost. They cannot use pheromones: they come out when the temperature would burn the slightest drop. Their navigation talent relies on two pieces of information: the heading measured using a sort of “celestial compass” to orient themselves using the sky’s polarized light, and the distance covered, measured by simply counting steps and incorporating the rate of movement relative to the sun measured optically by their eyes. Distance and heading are the two fundamental pieces of information that, once combined, allow them to return smoothly to the nest.

AntBot, a robot designed by CNRS and Aix-Marseille University (AMU) researchers at ISM, copies the desert ants’ exceptional navigation capacities to navigate without the use of GPS. It is equipped with an optical compass used to determine its heading by means of polarized light, and by an optical movement sensor directed to the sun to measure the distance covered. Armed with this information, AntBot has been shown to be able, like the desert ants, to explore its environment and to return on its own to its base, with precision of up to 1 cm after having covered a total distance of 14 meters. (1)

Navigating without GPS. Walking on your own.

This is the way it was supposed to be.

Relying not on things outside.

But on yourself inside.

Finding not your way with the light of the Sun.

But sensing your path through darkness with the Moon.

Treading the dark forest of existence.

With the help of the light of death inside you.

Trace your footsteps back to where you started from.

How could you ever want to go anywhere?

Take a good look.

These are not your footsteps…

Tools: God. Humans. Apes.

Advertisements
Photo by Siddharth Gondaliya from Pexels

Flexible tool use is closely associated to higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions. Now a group of cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists found out that the apes carefully weighed their options. To do so the apes considered the details such as differences in quality between the two food rewards and the functionality of the available tools in order to obtain a high-quality food reward. (1)

Using tools to harness the cosmos.

Apes.

Letting go of the tools to see the cosmos.

Humans.

Closing your eyes to know that you are the cosmos.

God.

Evolution does exist. But not in the direction we think of. We used to be gods. And then we started being humans. At the end, we will have the best tools in the world. And we will be nothing more than apes…

Question your assumptions.

And what is left, will be nothing more than the obvious…

You.

Sitting by the river. Feeling the forest.

With no forest anywhere in sight…

Imperfect evolution… Life without life…

Advertisements
Photo by Hamid Tajik from Pexels

The pinnacle of beauty to most people is a symmetrical face, one without any major left-right differences. But for blind Mexican cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus), asymmetry may be a lifesaver. That’s because their lopsided skulls may help them feel their way along dark cave walls – similar to a person navigating by touch in the dark. That behavior, presented here this week at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, suggests being a little “off” can have evolutionary benefits.

Lots of cave dwellers are a bit unbalanced. Cave fish tend to have one eye that is larger than the other, for example, and cave crickets have different size antennae. Some researchers wondered whether left-right differences might help these creatures get around.

They scanned the skulls of A. mexicanus fish from three caves in Mexico. Their computerized tomography scans revealed most fish skulls bent slightly to the left, giving the right side of their faces slightly more exposure. Other tests showed these fish tended to drift along the right-hand side of cave walls, presumably using the larger side of their faces to feel their way in the dark. (1)

We have learned that evolution makes things more suitable for survival. And we tend to connect this with perfection. Perfection of mechanisms, perfection of structure, perfection of function. It is this perfection which causes life.

But could it be that we are misled?

Blinded by the light, could it be that we are heading towards the dark?

We like to see order as the foundation of existence. Enchanted by it, we fail to notice that this gift always leads to death.

We like to see perfection as the foundation of life. Mesmerized by it, we fail to see that it is imperfection which leads to life.

It is only the imperfect beings which will live longer.

Do not envy them.

Take a good look.

They are crying in the darkness…

Feel the dark walls of existence around you.

They cry out silently…

Life is not about living!