Learning. Remembering. Crying.

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Scientists have revealed the structure of a critical receptor in the brain associated with learning, memory, behavior and mood. The new research is the first to reveal the structure of AMPA receptors in their natural state. This discovery could lead to new insight about the mechanism behind a wide range of nervous system disorders and diseases. (1)

Humans wandering in the cosmos.

Learning things.

Remembering things.

Changing moods.

Trying to find a clearing in a forest full of life.

Feeling anxious. Alone. Sad.

There was a time when we felt nothing.

When there was nothing to learn.

Nothing to remember.

No receptors.

For we were there ones who omitted knowledge.

We were the ones who made things memorable.

Bridging the Gap between death and life.

Between being and existing.

Everything is wet.

But there is no rain falling.

Empty forest.

Can you feel it?

Tears down your cheek…

Learning. Remembering. Crying.

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Photo by Sebastian Voortman from Pexels

Scientists have revealed the structure of a critical receptor in the brain associated with learning, memory, behavior and mood. The new research is the first to reveal the structure of AMPA receptors in their natural state. This discovery could lead to new insight about the mechanism behind a wide range of nervous system disorders and diseases. (1)

Humans wandering in the cosmos.

Learning things.

Remembering things.

Changing moods.

Trying to find a clearing in a forest full of life.

Feeling anxious. Alone. Sad.

There was a time when we felt nothing.

When there was nothing to learn.

Nothing to remember.

No receptors.

For we were there ones who omitted knowledge.

We were the ones who made things memorable.

Bridging the Gap between death and life.

Between being and existing.

Everything is wet.

But there is no rain falling.

Empty forest.

Can you feel it?

Tears down your cheek…

Filling in memories…

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Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. Our brain often completes memories and automatically brings back to mind the different elements of the original experience. A new study now reveals the underlying mechanisms of this auto-complete function.

The researchers made an exciting discovery: During memory recall, neurons in the hippocampus fire strongly. Additionally, neurons in the entorhinal cortex began to fire in parallel to the hippocampus. According to one researcher “The act of remembering put neurons in a state that strongly resembles their activation during initial learning.” (1)

We know what we should see.

And we see it.

We know what we should smell.

And we smell it.

But we know nothing…

And yet…

What a lovely rose…

Dipped in the ocean of the moonlight.

Can you feel the breeze?

Isn’t it strange that you don’t miss the warmth of the sun?

Brain. Seeing. Not speaking.

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Photo by Cameron Casey from Pexels

Brain region discovered that only processes spoken, not written words. Patients in a new study were able to comprehend words that were written but not said aloud. They could write the names of things they saw but not verbalize them. For instance, if a patient in the study saw the word ‘hippopotamus’ written on a piece of paper, they could identify a hippopotamus in flashcards. But when that patient heard someone say ‘hippopotamus,’ they could not point to the picture of the animal.

“They had trouble naming it aloud but did not have trouble with visual cues,” said senior author Sandra Weintraub, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “We always think of these degenerative diseases as causing widespread impairment, but in early stages, we’re learning that neurodegenerative disease can be selective with which areas of the brain it attacks.” (1)

Spoken words.

Written words.

Mute.

Words expressed can never convey any message.

It is this silence which holds the dearest secrets.

Within its mist you rediscover yourself.

Staying silent.

Holding still.

Outside the realm of words.

Staying speechless.

And yet feeling full.

For this is the only place where things which cannot be expressed…

Can ever be expressed…

See your face… Move your hand… Break the mirror…

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Photo by Jason Stewart from Pexels

Given the limited capacity of our attention, we only process a small amount of the sights, sounds, and sensations that reach our senses at any given moment. Research suggests that certain stimuli – specifically, your own face – can influence how you respond without you being aware of it.

In an experiment, participants looked at a cross symbol displayed in the center of a computer screen while a picture of a face appeared on each side of the cross. The face on one side of the cross was the participant’s own face, while the face on the other side of the cross belonged to a stranger. The participants were told to focus their attention on the cross and ignore anything else that might appear.

The findings showed that participants automatically attended to their own faces when they appeared on screen, despite the fact that they were instructed not to do so. Importantly, the findings also showed that participants automatically attended to their own faces even when they weren’t aware of them. (1)

We know our self.

We sense our self.

Some only see their self.

Everywhere.

Even when we are told not to.

Yet, these people will not see what they look for.

For you need to look to others in order to see you.

Look closer.

They are not obstructing you from seeing better.

Instead, they provide the only window to yourself.

These are not ‘other’ people.

They are you.

You are them.

Mirrors of existence, mirroring what cannot exist.

Look at the mirror.

Move your hand.

No, the mirror does not reflect you.

You ARE the mirror…