Chaos… Order… Chaos…

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Can chaotic systems also synchronize with each other? Physicists from Bar-Ilan University in Israel, along with colleagues from Spain, India and Italy, analyzed the Rossler system and discovered new phenomena that have been overlooked until now.

For the first time the researchers were able to measure the fine grain process that leads from disorder to synchrony, discovering a new kind of synchronization between chaotic systems: Topological Synchronization. Traditionally, synchronization has been examined by comparing the time-course of activity of the two systems. Topological Synchronization instead examines synchronization by comparing the structures of the systems.

As per the researchers, “Every chaotic system attracts its own unique strange attractor. By Topological Synchronization we mean that two strange attractors have the same organization and structures. At the beginning of the synchronization process, small areas on one strange attractor have the same structure of the other attractor, meaning that they are already synced. At the end of the process, all the areas of one strange attractor will have the structure of the other and complete Topological Synchronization has been reached.”

This means that chaotic systems synchronize gradually through local structures that, surprisingly, kick off in the sparse areas of the system and only then spread to the more populated areas. In these sparse areas the activity is less chaotic than in other areas and, as a result, it is easier for these areas to sync relative to those that are much more erratic. (1)

In a fully chaotic system.

Small clearings of order.

And at the end, the system will be in sync.

In a totally ordered system.

Vast hidden oceans of chaos.

And at the beginning, the system will breed a new cosmos…

A new cosmos which will again be in order once more.

An order which will create a new chaos to engulf everything…

For the cosmos we live in is neither ordered nor chaotic.

The cosmos we live in just Is.

Trying to speak to us.

Trying to break its limitations and communicate.

Throw that stone into the calm lake.

Can you hear the roaring abyss?

Father. Mother. Cosmos…

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It was long thought that during an embryo’s first cell division, one spindle is responsible for segregating the embryo’s chromosomes into two cells. Scientists now show that there are actually two spindles, one for each set of parental chromosomes, meaning that the genetic information from each parent is kept apart throughout the first division. (1)

Molded in fire.

Opposites in constant war.

A cosmos in turmoil.

Look at that beautiful day.

There is a tornado behind it.

Father. Mother…

I can feel it…

How peaceful…

A universe in fire…

Instability… Randomness… Out of design…

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A study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University has brought science one step closer to a molecular-level understanding of how patterns form in living tissue. The researchers engineered bacteria that, when incubated and grown, exhibited stochastic Turing patterns: a “lawn” of synthesized bacteria in a petri dish fluoresced an irregular pattern of red polka dots on a field of green.

Researchers showed that the stochastic Turing model is driven by randomness. In the study, scientists demonstrated both experimentally and theoretically that Turing patterns do in fact occur in living tissues – but with a twist. Where the instability that generates the patterns in Turing’s model is defined as a high diffusion ratio between two chemicals, an activator and an inhibitor, in this study, researchers demonstrate that it’s actually randomness – which would in most experiments be considered background noise – that generates what Goldenfeld has coined a stochastic Turing pattern. (1)

Trying to design bacteria.

So that they are unstable.

And they generate stable patterns…

Chaos births Order.

In the same way Order generates Chaos.

The world is One.

Moving in circles.

Every single moment.

Circles around itself.

Circles around an invisible point of nothingness.

Containing everything and nothing at the same time.

Watch these tigers waiting behind the bushes.

No, they are not trying to hide behind the trees.

They are the trees…

Causality debunked.

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Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences develop a new theoretical framework to describe how causal structures in quantum mechanics transform. They analyze under which conditions quantum mechanics allows the causal structure of the world to become “fuzzy.” In this case, a fixed order of events is not possible. The results were published in the journal Physical Review X.

The idea that events occur one after the other in a fixed causal order is part of our intuitive picture of the physical world. Imagine that Alice can send a message to Bob via a wire that connects them. Alice decides to have a barbecue and can invite Bob via the wire connection. If he gets invited, Bob decides to prepare some Ćevapčići to bring along. This is an example where the event in which Alice decides to invite Bob to the barbecue influences the event in which Bob decides to prepare food. Such an order of events characterizes a definite causal structure. However, research in the foundations of quantum mechanics suggests that, at the quantum level, causal structures may be “indefinite”. In an indefinite causal structure there might not be a fixed order in which events happen, i.e. whether Alice influences Bob or Bob influences Alice might not be defined.

“Our results demonstrate that under physically reasonable assumptions of continuity and reversibility a world with definite causal order will never become a world with an indefinite causal order and vice versa”, says Esteban Castro, one of the authors of the paper. This insight may lead to a more complete understanding of what the role of causality is in the quantum world. (1)

In the beginning there was chaos.

And then the cosmos was born.

We like to look into patterns.

We like to indulge into our hallucinations.

But every night, when we fall asleep, we remember.

It is not the Sun we celebrate.

What exists cannot change.

We are not scientists.

We are poets.

Admiring the Moon…

Rivers. Complex deltas. Order out of chaos.

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River deltas, with their intricate networks of waterways, coastal barrier islands, wetlands and estuaries, often appear to have been formed by random processes, but scientists at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions see order in the apparent chaos.

Through field studies and mathematical modeling, they have concluded that deltas “self-organize” to increase the number, direction and size – or diversity – of sediment transport pathways to the shoreline, boosting their ability to withstand human disturbances and naturally occurring factors. The research team’s findings have been published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (1)

The river on the shores of Asia Minor flows endlessly.

Every day it was different.

And yet the same.

For a wise man to cross it every day.

It was a simple river.

And yet it seems so complex to us now…