Longevity. Xenon 124. Universe.

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Theory predicts the isotope’s radioactive decay has a half-life that surpasses the age of the universe “by many orders of magnitude,” but no evidence of the process has appeared until now.

An international team of physicists that includes three Rice University researchers – assistant professor Christopher Tunnell, visiting scientist Junji Naganoma and assistant research professor Petr Chaguine – have reported the first direct observation of two-neutrino double electron capture for xenon 124, the physical process by which it decays. Their paper appears this week in the journal Nature.

While most xenon isotopes have half-lives of less than 12 days, a few are thought to be exceptionally long-lived, and essentially stable. Xenon 124 is one of those, though researchers have estimated its half-life at 160 trillion years as it decays into tellurium 124. The universe is presumed to be merely 13 to 14 billion years old.

The new finding puts the half-life of Xenon 124 closer to 18 sextillion years. (For the record, that’s 18,000,000,000,000,000,000,000.) (1)

We look up to the universe.

We admire the cosmos in awe.

But the cosmos is nothing more than the shell.

What is in it, is important.

Even particles can outlive the universe.

What matters is what cannot.

One day we will discover how huge the cosmos really is.

One day we will know how tiny we actually are.

And only then, will we understand that we were wrong.

About how significant we are.

Especially because we are not…

Lightning strikes twice. Life. Death. A storm still raging…

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Scientists have used the LOFAR radio telescope to study the development of lightning flashes in unprecedented detail. Their work reveals that the negative charges inside a thundercloud are not discharged all in a single flash, but are in part stored alongside the leader channel at Interruptions, inside structures which the researchers have called needles. This may cause a repeated discharge to the ground. (1)

Repetition.

The silent signals of One in a seemingly changing cosmos.

Everything different.

Everything the same.

Where life has existed before, life will rise again.

Where death manifested once, death will always be.

In a cosmos full of existence, being defined the forest.

In a cosmos defined by being, the forest always is.

Look at the rainbow.

Take pleasure from the sunny sky.

Fear not, but rejoice.

For the storm is not over yet…

Rain falls down.

But you do not feel wet.

Falling upon the cosmos.

Over and over again.

You are that rain.

Can you feel the dirt?

Lightning strikes twice. Life. Death. A storm still raging…

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Photo by Ray Bilcliff from Pexels

Scientists have used the LOFAR radio telescope to study the development of lightning flashes in unprecedented detail. Their work reveals that the negative charges inside a thundercloud are not discharged all in a single flash, but are in part stored alongside the leader channel at Interruptions, inside structures which the researchers have called needles. This may cause a repeated discharge to the ground. (1)

Repetition.

The silent signals of One in a seemingly changing cosmos.

Everything different.

Everything the same.

Where life has existed before, life will rise again.

Where death manifested once, death will always be.

In a cosmos full of existence, being defined the forest.

In a cosmos defined by being, the forest always is.

Look at the rainbow.

Take pleasure from the sunny sky.

Fear not, but rejoice.

For the storm is not over yet…

Rain falls down.

But you do not feel wet.

Falling upon the cosmos.

Over and over again.

You are that rain.

Can you feel the dirt?

Non-water. Inside the dead forest.

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Led by Professors Raffaele Mezzenga and Ehud Landau, a group of physicists and chemists from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have identified an unusual way to prevent water from forming ice crystals, so even at extreme sub-zero temperatures it retains the amorphous characteristics of a liquid.

In a first step, the researchers designed and synthesized a new class of lipids (fat molecules) to create a new form of “soft” biological matter known as a lipidic mesophase, by mixing those lipids with water. In the newly created material, the lipids spontaneously self-assemble and aggregate to form membranes. These membranes form a network of connected channels less than one nanometer in diameter. In this structure, there is no room in the narrow channels for water to form ice crystals, so it remains disordered even at extreme sub-zero temperatures. The lipids do not freeze either.

Using liquid helium, the researchers were able to cool a lipidic mesophase consisting of a chemically modified monoacylglycerol to a temperature as low as minus 263 degrees Celsius, which is a mere 10 degrees above the absolute zero temperature, and still no ice crystals formed. (1)

Water freezes at zero degrees.

Unless you mix it with something else.

But then, it is not water.

And it can freeze at lower temperatures.

Everything is what it is.

But it can change to something else.

At the end, all things freeze at the same temperature.

If they are the same.

Or at different. If they are not.

Nature doesn’t care.

In the deepest cold…

Under the heat of the summer sun…

There are no temperatures.

Just things which boil and freeze.

There are many paths inside the forest of existence.

Do you care about how Achilles will reach the turtle?

Possibilities.

There is nothing to compare anything with.

For everything is connected with everything.

And all measurements are just reflections in the mirror.

Potential.

At the end you will be in the clearing…

Only to realize that the clearing is you.

Consumed by fire.

Breathing cold air…

Magnetic sense. Astronomy. Void cosmos. Humans moving.

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The human brain can unconsciously respond to changes in Earth’s magnetic fields, according to a team of geoscientists and neurobiologists. This interdisciplinary study revives a research area in neuroscience that has remained dormant for decades. (1)

We used to believe we can sense the cosmos.

We used to have astrology and religion.

Now we have astronomy and science.

And we are surprised to learn that we are one with the universe.

We can still sense it. But we cannot understand why.

We still dream at night. But it makes us worry that something is not right.

Astronomy is the bastard child of astrology and religion.

Seeing nothing where its parents saw everything.

And all it wants is to kill it’s parents.

Stars moving. People walking. Bird singing. Babies crying.

We see the surface of the cosmos without wanting to accept that there is depth in the ocean we travel on. At some point even astronomy will know it all. And it will be able to see all the gears making the world go round. And at that point of great triumph, it will see they are moving only because we have our hands on them.

And our laughter will echo through the cosmos.

And even for a fleeing moment.

Everything will stop.

And for the first time…

The cosmos will start sensing us…

And with rejoice, the universe will whisper.

(Welcome back…)