Religion as a PREREQUISITE for Science!

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Is religiosity related to being a good scientist?

With so many scientists being religious, everyone agrees that religiosity is not an obstacle for scientists. But I go one step further, by saying that religiosity is actually a kind of prerequisite for science.

Let me explain my self…

As already mentioned in “Religion and Science Unification – Towards religional science” article, science has God as its starting point.

The notion of us, humans, being made in the image of God gave scientists like Newton the power and will to try to understand the universe: “if we are made in His image, then we have the ability to understand His creation”, people said from the time of Saint Thomas Aquinas.

What is more, religion had for a long time been the cradle of science. And remember that science was not even separate from religion for thousands of years – not until the fake-hero story of Galileo (read Feyerabend for the true nature of this case). It is not accidental after all that all civilization was developed by societies holding some kind of religion – from ancient Greeks to the Christian Europe. (one could mention Chinese civilization as an exception, but one cannot discard the deep spirituality of Confucianism) The first universities were monasteries and the lust of people to understand the mind of God is what drove scientific progress for centuries. Dawkins himself teaches and speaks against religion in a College of… St Mary.

Surely the advancement of science can be based on mere curiosity.

But apes and all other animals have curiosity as well.

But they did not develop science.

Trying to reach apotheosis by understanding God is surely a greater motive…

Curiosity, microbes, observing.

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A recent study of swabs taken from the rover before it launched found its surfaces contained 65 bacteria species. Engineers are supposed to put spacecraft like Curiosity through a stringent cleaning regimen before launch. Yet certain species of bacteria are known to survive even NASA’s cleanrooms. Wondering about what remained on Curiosity even after cleaning, scientists from the University of Idaho and California’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory swabbed different parts of the rover before sending it off. After gathering and characterizing their bacteria, the scientists exposed them to harsh conditions, including desiccation, ultraviolet light exposure, extreme cold and extreme pH levels. About 11 percent of the bacterial strains they found survived at least two conditions. (1)

The premise that we can observe something without affecting it is one of the major dogmas of science today.
Destroying that illusion it is the first step towards the truth.
Realizing that observing something is what makes that something exist is the next step.

Towards understanding what is in front of our eyes.
Which is actually behind them.
Inside our minds I mean.
Well, you know what I mean.
Observe me well.
I am here.
Close your eyes.
I am gone.

Mars here we come!

Glenelg, coincidences, “coincidences”…

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The infamous martian NASA rover Curiosity has stumbled upon a werid rock [1] on the red planet, while traveling to a place named Glenelg. The rock discovered is of a type called “mugearite”.

And guess what: As the martian rock is near the place named “Glenelg” (the martian Glenelg), Earth’s Mugearite (the place from which the “mugearite” rock type took its name) is equally close to Earth’s Glenelg in Scotland! [2]

Coincidences…

A bad joke of cosmic proportions?

Or the way of the Cosmos to glorify its Unity…?