What is Being? A child’s answer…

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“What is Being?” – “It is a word” (!) [A child’s answer to the greatest philosophical question]

Once I asked a child what Being is…

(Once I asked my self what Being is…)

And the child answered…

“It is just a word dad”

(And I laughed…)

And my dad was impressed…

And the whole world of philosophy kept on going…

Trying to figure out what Being is.

“What exists?” – “That which we have named…”

The evolution of… evolution.

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Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

New research identifies a previously overlooked global event which changed the course of the evolution of life in the oceans. It coincided with a rise in calcium carbonate-secreting plankton and their subsequent deposition on the ocean floor.

The ocean as we understand it today was shaped by a global evolutionary regime shift around 170 million years ago, according to new research.

Until that point, the success of organisms living within the marine environment had been strongly controlled by non-biological factors, including ocean chemistry and climate. However, from the middle of the Jurassic period onwards (some 170 million years ago), biological factors such as predator-prey relationships became increasingly important.

Writing in Nature Geoscience, scientists say this change coincided with the proliferation of calcium carbonate-secreting plankton and their subsequent deposition on the ocean floor.

They believe the rise of this plankton stabilised the chemical composition of the ocean and provided the conditions for one of the most prominent diversifications of marine life in Earth’s history. (1)

Evolution evolves.

And through the ages of existence.

Even Being redefines itself.

Eternal change.

Towards a goal which keeps shifting.

Everlasting life.

Walking a road that keeps going.

Poor man.

How much do you really need to walk into the clearing?

Before you realize you shouldn’t have left the clearing?

Look up.

You haven’t walked a single step.

Gods. Playing…

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Image by Spiros Kakos

Humans trying to find the meaning of life.

Humans trying to understand existence.

Trying to decipher being.

Philosophers trying to understand change.

Physicists trying to define time.

Biologists trying to know life.

We were kids.
Trying to play.

But the game is no longer a game.
Angered by our failures to know.
Insisting to know more and more…

And understand.

And explain.

Failing to see our failures as answers as we did before…
About life and its meaning.
About existence and being.
About time and change.
There is nothing to know, but what we already knew.

Kids playing.

What reason is there to play?
No meaning.
No being.
No existence.
No time.
No change.
What reason is there to play?

Dear God.
Have I ever seen you pray?
Now I see.

(I am you)

Trying to understand.
Trying to know more.

Go on.

Ask the child.

How could you play with something that is not yours?

Explanatory note: We are the child. Not part of God, but God himself. Trying to play with the cosmos. Only because the cosmos is ours in the first place…

Seeing through your eyes…

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Photo by Dark Indigo from Pexels

Everyday life is full of situations that require us to take others’ perspectives – for example, when showing a book to a child, we intuitively know how to hold it so that they can see it well, even if it is harder to see for ourselves. Or when performing before an audience, we often can’t help but picture how we will look to the other people.

New research published in Current Biology has provided the first direct evidence that we can do this because we spontaneously form mental images of how the world looks to the other person, so that we can virtually see through their eyes and make judgements as if it was what we were seeing. (1)

Wise men always did that.

Seeing the cosmos through the eyes of the cosmos.

And what they saw left them in awe.

Because there was nothing to see.

But the cosmos itself…

On that frozen night. On that calm lake.

Through the stormy winds. In the raging ocean.

There the universe cries out in silence…

There is nothing to see.

I am seeing you…

Slowly… Dying… Living for ever…

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Photo by Ivan Samkov from Pexels

A big earthquake occurred south of Istanbul in the summer of 2016, but it was so slow that nobody noticed. The earthquake, which took place at mid-crustal depth, lasted more than fifty days. Only a novel processing technique applied to data from special borehole strainmeter instruments and developed by researchers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, in collaboration with the Turkish Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency (AFAD) and the UNAVCO institute from US, allowed to identify the ultra-slow quake below the Sea of Marmara. The team led by Patricia Martínez-Garzón from GFZ’s section “Geomechanics and Scientific Drilling” reports in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters. (1)

Being born.

Growing up.

Laughing.

Dying.

Crying.

Being born.

Laughing.

Crying.

Life slowly changing.

The cosmos showing emerging.

And in the midst of all…

A man.

Giving meaning to existence.

Erasing the circle on the sand.

Slowly…

Without anyone noticing.

But himself…

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