Mountains!

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Life on Earth is amazingly diverse, and exhibits striking geographical global patterns in biodiversity. A pair of companion papers reveal that mountain regions — especially those in the tropics — are hotspots of extraordinary and baffling richness. Although mountain regions cover only 25% of Earth’s land area, they are home to more than 85% of the world’s species of amphibians, birds, and mammals, and many of these are found only in mountains. (1)

But can mountains exist without the sea?

Can the highest peaks be, without the wind and the air?

Would Everest ever reach its highest height without the worm crawling in its feet?

Could Olympus be, without people staring at it in awe?

How can the forest be without someone walking in the forest?

How could a tree grow, without the rain?

How could rain fall without a mountain?

Could there an ocean exist without that mountains?

Could the mountains be without any ocean?

Think of a dry world with no life in it. A world full of nothing but mountains. A dead world. Dominated by high peaks and imposing highlands. No rain. No sea. No ocean. No worms. Just mountains. Great high mountains. Everywhere. An empty world. With no mountains…

Worms… Deep below…

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The sea bed in the deep ocean during the Cambrian period was thought to have been inhospitable to animal life because it lacked enough oxygen to sustain it.

But research published in the scientific journal Geology reveals the existence of fossilized worm tunnels dating back to the Cambrian period – 270 million years before the evolution of dinosaurs.

The discovery, by USask professor Brian Pratt, suggested that animal life in the sediment at that time was more widespread than previously thought.

The worm tunnels – borrows where worms lived and munched through the sediment – are invisible to the naked eye. But Pratt “had a hunch” and sliced the rocks and scanned them to see whether they revealed signs of ancient life. Pratt digitally enhanced images of the rock surfaces so he could examine them more closely. Only then did the hidden ‘superhighway’ of burrows made by several different sizes and types of prehistoric worm emerge in the rock. (1)

Under every rock you will find something.

Even when nothing is to be seen.

Worms, bacteria, microbes, viruses…

The cosmos is full of life.

We are not here as its culmination.

But as agents of death.

We are not standing at the peak of existence.

But we bear news of its end.

For only through death can the meaning of existence be revealed.

And it is our mission to reveal its meaning to anyone not able to grasp it.

Look at those bacteria.

Still alive.

So dead!

Past & Future… The link we do not see…

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Ancient rocks provide clues to Earth’s early history: A research team has provided compelling evidence for significant ocean oxygenation before the GOE, on a larger scale and to greater depths than previously recognized. (1)

Looking for the past in rocks. Because we see the history as something solid. Written on stone. Fooled by the phenomena we are. Looking at the surface instead of the essence of things. Everything is interconnected. The past is as volatile as the future. There was a story once, of a Chinese high-ranking official who wanted to be an emperor. He never made it. It is said, that he did not make it because if he did, he would perform atrocious crimes as an emperor in the future. And his future came back to haunt his past. Funny story. As funny as the idea of someone affecting the future, but not being able to affect the past…

Look at you in the mirror.

Do you feel blessed? Do you feel haunted?

Are you that person you were ten years ago?

Look again at the mirror.

Ten years ago.

Did you feel you?

Did you remember yourself?

Earth’s core. Human souls.

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A new study could help us understand how our planet was formed. Scientists report that their research shows that Earth’s inner core is solid – a finding made possible by a new method for detecting shear waves, or ‘J waves’ in the inner core. (1)

We believe that pressure creates solids.

That diamonds are the hardest material on Earth.

But the hearts of humans are made out of thin air.

Soft, airy and non-binding. Light and flexible.

Dare not to underestimate them.

Cause it is these humans who are the core of Earth.

Those humans giving diamonds their shinning.

Those humans making the Earth move in the vast space.

This was not always like this.

In the beginning this was a lonely inanimate planet.

Full of diamonds.

Full of growing trees

Full of flying bees.

Until someone discarded than diamond in the dirt…

Until someone saw that tree falling…

Until someone cried for that bee dying…

And the cosmos exploded into thin air…

Walking dead (fossils)… Elusive silent world…

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Using the fossil record to accurately estimate the timing and pace of past mass extinctions is no easy task, and a new study highlights how fossil evidence can produce a misleading picture if not interpreted with care.

Florida Museum of Natural History researchers used a series of 130-foot cores drilled from the Po Plain in northeastern Italy to test a thought experiment: Imagine catastrophe strikes the Adriatic Sea, swiftly wiping out modern marine life. Could this hypothetical mass extinction be reconstructed correctly from mollusks – hard-shelled animals such as oysters and mussels – preserved in these cores?

When they examined the cores, the results were “somewhat unnerving”, said Michal Kowalewski, Thompson Chair of Invertebrate Paleontology and the study’s principal investigator.

Taken at face value, the cores presented a dramatically distorted record of both the timing and tempo of extinction, potentially calling into question some of the methods paleontologists commonly use to interpret past mass extinctions.

“[…] the nature of the geological record is complicated, so it is not trivial to decipher it correctly.” Kowalewski said. Many parameters, like by species’ ecological preferences, sea level and the makeup of sedimentary basins, could skew patterns of mass extinction. (1)

Always in motion is the past.

Making the future hard to grasp.

A future always in turmoil.

Making the past difficult to see.

At the end, we always experience the “now”.

A “now” locked in the whirlwinds of existence.

What a strange cosmos.

Always moving.

A blur in the background of nothingness.

Almost as if it doesn’t want to be seen…

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