Nanomaterials. AI. Prediction.

Advertisements
Photo by Matteo Badini from Pexels

Breakthroughs in the field of nanophotonics – how light behaves on the nanometer scale – have paved the way for the invention of “metamaterials,” human-made materials that have enormous applications, from remote nanoscale sensing to energy harvesting and medical diagnostics. But their impact on daily life has been hindered by a complicated manufacturing process with large margins of error.

An interdisciplinary Tel Aviv University study published in “Light: Science and Applications” demonstrated a way of streamlining the process of designing and characterizing basic nanophotonic, metamaterial elements.

“Our new approach depends almost entirely on Deep Learning, a computer network inspired by the layered and hierarchical architecture of the human brain,” Prof. Wolf explains. “It’s one of the most advanced forms of machine learning, responsible for major advances in technology, including speech recognition, translation and image processing. We thought it would be the right approach for designing nanophotonic, metamaterial elements”.

The scientists fed a Deep Learning network with 15,000 artificial experiments to teach the network the complex relationship between the shapes of the nanoelements and their electromagnetic responses. “We demonstrated that a ‘trained’ Deep Learning network can predict, in a split second, the geometry of a fabricated nanostructure,” Dr. Suchowski says. (1)

Imitating the human brain.

To predict what the human brain cannot predict.

Could you have a better proof that our brain is not algorithmic?

We are humans not because we can tell the future.

But because we have experienced it already.

We are humans not because we can find the answers.

But because we can ask the questions…

We are gods not because we know how metamaterials will form.

But because we don’t even care…

Creating with style…

Advertisements
Photo by Matteo Badini from Pexels

In search of inspiration for improving computer-based text translators, researchers at Dartmouth College turned to the Bible for guidance. The result is an algorithm trained on various versions of the sacred texts that can convert written works into different styles for different audiences.

Internet tools to translate text between languages like English and Spanish are widely available. Creating style translators – tools that keep text in the same language but transform the style – have been much slower to emerge. The Dartmouth-led team saw in the Bible “a large, previously untapped dataset of aligned parallel text.” Beyond providing infinite inspiration, each version of the Bible contains more than 31,000 verses that the researchers used to produce over 1.5 million unique pairings of source and target verses for machine-learning training sets.

“The English-language Bible comes in many different written styles, making it the perfect source text to work with for style translation,” said Keith Carlson, a PhD student at Dartmouth and lead author of the research paper about the study.

As an added benefit for the research team, the Bible is already thoroughly indexed by the consistent use of book, chapter and verse numbers. The predictable organization of the text across versions eliminates the risk of alignment errors that could be caused by automatic methods of matching different versions of the same text.

“The Bible is a ‘divine’ data set to work with to study this task,” said Daniel Rockmore, a professor of computer science at Dartmouth and contributing author on the study. “Humans have been performing the task of organizing Bible texts for centuries, so we didn’t have to put our faith into less reliable alignment algorithms.” (1)

In the beginning there was Logos.

And we tried to express God with words.

We were bad at it in the beginning.

But gradually we learned.

To use words better.

To express ourselves.

To make art with lifeless marking on white paper.

And people read and wept.

And people believed and followed.

And people forgot.

And people became indifferent.

At the end, the markings on the paper were dead.

Being nothing more than sad reminders.

That we once upon a time were alive.

That we used to be part of God.

In the beginning there was Logos.

And we tried to express God with words.

We were so good at it in the beginning…

PS. Dartmouth College has a long history of innovation in computer science. The term “artificial intelligence” was coined at Dartmouth during a 1956 conference that created the AI research discipline. Other advancements include the design of BASIC – the first general-purpose and accessible programing language – and the Dartmouth Time-Sharing System that contributed to the modern-day operating system.

Silent footsteps… Echoes of nothingness…

Advertisements
Photo by stein egil liland from Pexels

A team of scientists has uncovered the neural processes mice use to ignore their own footsteps, a discovery that offers new insights into how we learn to speak and play music.

“The ability to ignore one’s own footsteps requires the brain to store and recall memories and to make some pretty stellar computations”, explains David Schneider, an assistant professor at New York University’s Center for Neural Science and one of the paper’s lead authors. “These are the building blocks for other, more important sound-generating behaviors, like recognizing the sounds you make when learning how to speak or to play a musical instrument”.

The research was reported in the journal Nature. (1)

Once upon a time we did listen to God.

But then we stopped doing so.

Once upon a time we did listen to others.

But then we stopped doing so.

Once upon a time we did listen to our self.

But then we stopped doing so.

We used to pay attention to everything.

But then, we started listening.

And the world became silent…

Shame.

Advertisements
Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Shame on you. These three simple words can have devastating effect on an individual’s psyche.

But why is that? Some theorists argue that feeling shame is a pathology, a condition to be cured. Others dismiss it as a useless, ugly emotion. A research team at the University of Montreal and UC Santa Barbara’s Center for Evolutionary Psychology (CEP), however, suggest something altogether different. Shame, they argue, was built into human nature by evolution because it served an important function for our foraging ancestors.

Living in small, highly interdependent bands, the researchers explain, our ancestors faced frequent life-threatening reversals, and they counted on their fellow band members to value them enough during bad times to pull them through. So being devalued by others – deemed unworthy of help – was literally a threat to their survival. Therefore, when considering how to act, it was critical to weigh the direct payoff of a potential action against its social costs. (1)

Shame on me. Because I value your opinion.

Not because I value you. But because I value me and will need your help.

But this is not true shame. But a hypocritical stance for personal survival.

True shame never comes from the outside.

True shame is always internal and personal.

I do not feel shame for what you might think about me. But because of what I know about myself. I do not care about your opinion. I only care about mine.

Only a God can truly be ashamed.

Standing on top of existence.

Conversing with Himself.

There is no one to converse with.

And yet, someone is talking.

A tear dropping.

A cosmos laughing…

Believing in the brain…

Advertisements
Photo by Harrison Haines from Pexels

Humans constantly experience an ever-changing stream of subjective feelings that is only interrupted during sleep and deep unconsciousness. Finnish researches show how the subjective feelings map into five major categories: positive emotions, negative emotions, cognitive functions, somatic states, and illnesses. All these feelings were imbued with strong bodily sensations. (1)

In both ADHD and emotional instability disorders (e.g. borderline and antisocial personality disorder as well as conduct disorder in children), the brain exhibits similar changes in overlapping areas, meaning that the two types of conditions should be seen as related and attention should be paid to both during diagnosis. This according to researchers at Karolinska Institutet behind a new study published in Molecular Psychiatry. The results can lead to a broader treatment for both conditions. (2)

We believe in the brain. And we have become slaves of it.

We used to be sons of God. And for that we were free.

So free to forget Him. And enslave ourselves to nothingness.

Still, we can go back.

Only if we stop believing in the power of non-believing.

And we start believing again…