Cosmic-scale magnetic fields. Scientific models’ dirty little secrets…

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While researchers have believed for some time that magnetic fields of femto-Gauss strength extend to the largest scales in the universe — to scales larger than the largest clusters of galaxies — it is an unresolved mystery how such magnetic fields can have been created in the early universe.

One logical possibility is that the magnetic fields were enhanced by the primordial period of inflation, which is needed also to solve the flatness and horizon problem in the standard Big-Bang model. But the problem is that magnetic fields generated during inflation have been believed to quickly be washed away by the subsequent ordinary expansion of the universe making successful inflationary magnetogenesis a challenge.

Recently the researchers Takeshi Kobayashi from International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Italy and Martin S. Sloth from University of Southern Denmark have shown that due to Faraday’s law of induction, the assumed evolution of electromagnetic fields after inflation is different than previously assumed if there are also strong primordial electric fields.

“This opens a new door to our understanding of the origin of cosmic magnetic fields,” says Martin S. Sloth, professor, CP3-Origins, Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Southern Denmark. (1)

Magnetic fields everywhere. And yet we cannot understand why magnetic fields are everywhere. One day we will know. But how can we know anything else without knowing the obvious? How can we know magnetism if we cannot explain how the massive prevailing fields in the universe are formed? How can we know the secrets of life if we cannot understand life and how it emerged? How can we know about gravity without knowing how it can be paired with the other major theory of the cosmos (QM)?

How arrogant must we be to know anything without knowing everything?

Behold one of the dirty secrets of the science process of creating models.

That they work based on what they explain and not based on what they don’t!

Behold one of the greatest secrets of men.

That they know based on only what they know…

But one day we will know everything.

And then, only then, will we know anything…

Related article: Check the harmonia-philosophica.blogspot.com portal!

Hunger…

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Researchers discovers how hunger might make food tastier: Using optogenetic and chemogenetic techniques, researchers have identified brain circuits underlying hunger-induced changes in the preferences for sweet and aversive tastes in mice. These circuits involved Agouti-related peptide-expressing neurons, which projected to glutamate neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. From there, glutamate neurons projecting to the lateral septum increased sweetness preferences, and glutamate neurons projecting to the lateral habenula decreased sensitivity to aversive tastes. (1)

Humans are always hungry for life…

We are always hungry for knowledge.

But be careful.

Question whatever you wish.

For one day you might get it.

And you will never question whether there was anything to get in the first place…

What colour?

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What colour were fossil animals? Scientists have evaluated fossil color reconstruction methods and proposed a new study framework that improves and expands current practice. (1)

What a weird era.

Our knowledge gets accumulated in amazing rates.

And yet, we are still here.

Only knowing about us.

Yes, we know about the dinosaurs. But we will never know them the way we would if we lived with them. The only thing we can truly know is that we experience. And the only thing we experience is our self. Funny cosmos. We insist on looking outside. And yet, we can only know the inside. Overwhelmed by thousands and thousands of trivial important things. Whereas we ignore the most important trivial ones.

Look!

Science has discovered another species.

And we don’t even know what color it is…

It sounds inconsequential.

And, thus, the most significant thing we could ever know…

Reading. Seeing. Seeing better!

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Reading is a recent invention in the history of human culture — too recent for dedicated brain networks to have evolved specifically for it. How, then, do we accomplish this remarkable feat? As we learn to read, a brain region known as the ‘visual word form area’ (VWFA) becomes sensitive to script (letters or characters). However, some have claimed that the development of this area takes up (and thus detrimentally affects) space that is otherwise available for processing culturally relevant objects such as faces, houses or tools.

An international research team led by Falk Huettig (MPI and Radboud University Nijmegen) and Alexis Hervais-Adelman (MPI and University of Zurich) set out to test the effect of reading on the brain’s visual system. If learning to read leads to ‘competition’ with other visual areas in the brain, readers should have different brain activation patterns from non-readers — and not just for letters, but also for faces, tools, or houses. ‘Recycling’ of brain networks when learning to read has previously been thought to negatively affect evolutionary old functions such as face processing. Huettig and Hervais-Adelman, however, hypothesized that reading, rather than negatively affecting brain responses to non-orthographic (non-letter) objects, may, conversely, result in increased brain responses to visual stimuli in general. (1)

Seeing. Reading. Learning.

In an inactive cosmos we are active.

Don’t be fooled by the super nova or the black holes colliding.

There is silence in the cosmos.

And we break that silence with our chatter.

Seeing. Seeing more. And then even more!

Learning to read in a cosmos which says nothing.

Nothing but the obvious…

Listen to your self while reading aloud.

He doesn’t truly say anything.

Except only when you stay silent and listen to him…

Hard to exist?

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Astronomers have discovered the most massive neutron star to date, a rapidly spinning pulsar approximately 4,600 light-years from Earth. This record-breaking object is teetering on the edge of existence, approaching the theoretical maximum mass possible for a neutron star. (1)

Should it be there?

According to what we knew, perhaps no.

But then again, we know more now.

Day by day, the possibilities for its existence rise.

Year by year, the probability for the existence of anything increases.

At the end, we will know an infinite number of things.

At the end, we will be able to believe everything.

And at that moment, we will realize…

That we shouldn’t believe anything in the first place…

Watch the stars.

You know…

The only reason they are there.

Is because the sky is dark…

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