Children. Adults. Lies.

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Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

‘If you don’t behave, I’ll call the police,’ is a lie that parents might use to get their young children to behave. Parents’ lies elicit compliance in the short term, but a new psychology study suggests that they are associated with detrimental effects when the child becomes an adult. (1)

At the end, the truth will always come to light.

So don’t be afraid if it. Use it.

Lies will only breed lies.

Look at humans today. So engulfed in their need for life.

Trying to convince themselves that there is nothing more important.

And the quest for life creates what else but more thirst for life!

More thirst for sensing the cosmos.

More thirst for feeling the universe.

A deep urge to find other sources of life elsewhere!

And we will keep on going until we discover life everywhere!

At the end, we will behold a loving universe.

So beautiful.

So vibrant.

So true.

So perfectly wrong…

Question the obvious!

Only fake things are perfect.

Only illusions are so true.

There is ugliness in truth. For it is raw in nature. Killing anything which does not exist. And since nothing does, a loving cosmos cannot do anything but wrench the world in blood.

Do you dare sacrifice yourself?

Hey kid!

Who told you you were alive in the first place?

Lying…

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Psychologists have documented children lying as early as age two. Some experts even consider lying a developmental milestone, like crawling and walking, because it requires sophisticated planning, attention and the ability to see a situation from someone else’s perspective to effectively manipulate them.

Harvard cognitive neuroscientist Joshua Greene said for most of us, lying takes work. In studies, he presented study subjects with a chance to deceive for monetary gain while examining their brains in a functional MRI machine, which maps blood flow to active parts of the brain.

Some people told the truth instantly and instinctively. But others opted to lie, and they showed increased activity in their frontal parietal control network, which is involved in difficult or complex thinking. This suggests that they were deciding between truth and dishonesty — and ultimately opting for the latter.

However in general and for most people, lying gets limited as we develop a sense of morality and the ability to self-regulate. A 2010 study on the prevalence of lying in America found that in a given 24-hour period, most adults reported not telling any lies. Almost half the lies recorded in the study could be attributed to just 5 percent of participants. And most people avoided lying when they could, turning to deception only when the truth was troublesome. (1)

We believe we do not tell any lies.

We like to believe we are moral.

But we start lying from the very first moment we wake up.

How are you?

Very good, thank you!

Yes, you will die.

You haven’t forgotten.

You just like lying to yourself.

Good morning.

Everything is not fine.

Petty little man.

Wake up.

Rise!

Science, Scientists, Propaganda.

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In the northernmost reaches of the Canadian Arctic, 500 miles (800 kilometers) away from the nearest human settlement, researchers discovered a literal message in a bottle, Halifax’s Herald News reports.

It begins just like the worst examples of cover letters on the Internet: “TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN”. But the rest of it is pretty awesome. It turns out it’s a note buried by Paul Walker, an American geologist well known to those in his field today. (1)

Every field needs its heroes. And so does science. From the fake story of the “But it moves!” supposedly said by Galileo, to a story of a lost letter in a bottle by a “stranded ice explorer” (well, the truth is that he had a stroke, his partners returned him safely back and he died later in his parents’ house – with the letter having nothing to do with the whole story) over-exaggerating events for the sake of marketing is more and more in the agenda.

The simple story of a carpenter who died for his love of people does not sell much nowadays…

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A world of φαίνεσθαι, a world of lies…

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We live in a world where φαίνεσθαι (Greek for “appearances”) seems more powerfull than “is”. People adore women who are just plainly UGLY just because they have concealed their uglyness under tons of makeup.

Modern people are not able to see beyond flesh and bones – they actually want to be fooled. Its too hard to think beyond what you see. Not too many are able of such a feat…

Appearances over Essence…

Source of pictures: 1, 2

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