Trees dying… Don’t care…

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Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Joshua trees facing extinction: They outlived mammoths and saber-toothed tigers. But without dramatic action to reduce climate change, new research shows Joshua trees won’t survive much past this century. (1)

What does it matter? Trees are eternal. We die.

Worms live forever. The universe is Ephemeral.

The world doesn’t care for existence.

It is existence which cannot be without the cosmos!

Look at the tree dying.

You aren’t watching it.

It is not doing.

It is watching you.

As you are being born…

Changing geometry. Blurry lines…

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Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Atomic interactions in everyday solids and liquids are so complex that some of these materials’ properties continue to elude physicists’ understanding. Solving the problems mathematically is beyond the capabilities of modern computers, so scientists at Princeton University have turned to an unusual branch of geometry instead.

Researchers led by Andrew Houck, a professor of electrical engineering, have built an electronic array on a microchip that simulates particle interactions in a hyperbolic plane, a geometric surface in which space curves away from itself at every point. A hyperbolic plane is difficult to envision — the artist M.C. Escher used hyperbolic geometry in many of his mind-bending pieces — but is perfect for answering questions about particle interactions and other challenging mathematical questions. (1)

Draw a line on the paper.

Look at the circle on the sand.

A teardrop falling on water.

The moon circling the Earth.

A circle turning into a square.

Sun turning into darkness.

The ink is blurring now.

The line is fading.

And with strange aeons…

Even the paper will reduce into dust.

Your geometry will be lost. Along with everything reminding it. You will be alone at the end. And your tears will fall in the water. And they will create circles again. Don’t cry. Just take the pen. Don’t wander whether you can draw one on paper. You know you can…

Listening to music. Humans. Apes.

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Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

In the eternal search for understanding what makes us human, scientists found that our brains are more sensitive to pitch, the harmonic sounds we hear when listening to music, than our evolutionary relative the macaque monkey. The study, funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, highlights the promise of Sound Health, a joint project between the NIH and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts that aims to understand the role of music in health.

“We found that a certain region of our brains has a stronger preference for sounds with pitch than macaque monkey brains,” said Bevil Conway, Ph.D., investigator in the NIH’s Intramural Research Program and a senior author of the study published in Nature Neuroscience. “The results raise the possibility that these sounds, which are embedded in speech and music, may have shaped the basic organization of the human brain.” (1)

Yes, we are the only ones listening to music.

Because our mind is never here.

We love traveling to the stars.

Only because we detest the Earth on which we were born.

We will learn one day.

When we reach the stars.

That those bright small dots we will see.

Is our home.

Which we have left a long time ago…