Self-assembling

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Chemists have created a new material that self-assembles into 2D networks in a predictable and reproducible manner. They have successfully synthesized a complex material by design — paving the way for its suite of new properties to be applied in many fields. (1)

Self-assembling materials…

Self-assembling continents…

Self-assembling planets…

Self-assembling stars…

Look everything from above and you will see. That what you see is nothing but an illusion. Not because it does not exist. But because what you believe you did NOT see*, actually existed everywhere in the first place. Inside a self-assembling cosmos…

* Check for example the case of humans believing there is no water on the Moon (now we have started discovering it everywhere), that there are no other planets like Earth (now we have started discovering them everywhere), that life is rare in the universe (now we have started discovering indications for it everywhere) et cetera.

Quantum… time? Quantum… cosmos?!

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An international group of physicists led by Stevens Institute of Technology, University of Vienna and University of Queensland reveal the quantum properties of time, whereby the flow of time doesn’t observe a straight arrow forward, but one where cause and effect can co-exist both in the forward and backward direction.

To show this scenario, researchers merged quantum mechanics and general relativity to conduct a Gedanken experiment.

To illustrate what happens, imagine a pair of starships training for a mission. They are asked to fire at each other at a specified time and dodge the fire at another time, whereby each ship knows the exact time when to fire and when to dodge. If either ship fires too early, it will destroy the other, and this establishes an unmistakable time order between the firing events.

If a powerful agent could place a sufficiently massive object, say a planet, closer to one ship it would slow down its flow of time. As a result, the ship would dodge the fire too late and would be destroyed.

Quantum mechanics complicates the matter. When placing the planet in a state of superposition near one ship or the other, both can be destroyed or survive at the same time. The sequence of events exists in a state of superposition, such that each starship simultaneously destroys the other. (1)

An interesting idea.

But why stop at the spaceships?

Why not extrapolate to planets?

To the cosmos?

To existence itself?

Look around.

So many things to doubt. And yet you know you shouldn’t.

Close your eyes.

There is nothing there. And yet, you know there is…

Once upon a time you were born.

Once upon a time you have died.

But it matters not.

For you will always be here now.

Look around.

So many things to believe. And you know you should.

Close your eyes.

Everything is there. And yet you know nothing is…

Once upon a time you died.

Once upon a time you were born.

But it matters not.

For you were never here anyway.

Trees dying… Don’t care…

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Joshua trees facing extinction: They outlived mammoths and saber-toothed tigers. But without dramatic action to reduce climate change, new research shows Joshua trees won’t survive much past this century. (1)

What does it matter?

Trees are eternal.

We die.

Worms live forever.

The universe is Ephemeral.

The world doesn’t care for existence.

It is existence that cannot be without the cosmos!

Look at the tree dying.

You aren’t watching it.

It is not dying.

It is watching you.

As you are being born…

Changing geometry. Blurry lines…

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Atomic interactions in everyday solids and liquids are so complex that some of these materials’ properties continue to elude physicists’ understanding. Solving the problems mathematically is beyond the capabilities of modern computers, so scientists at Princeton University have turned to an unusual branch of geometry instead.

Researchers led by Andrew Houck, a professor of electrical engineering, have built an electronic array on a microchip that simulates particle interactions in a hyperbolic plane, a geometric surface in which space curves away from itself at every point. A hyperbolic plane is difficult to envision — the artist M.C. Escher used hyperbolic geometry in many of his mind-bending pieces — but is perfect for answering questions about particle interactions and other challenging mathematical questions. (1)

Draw a line on the paper.

Look at the circle on the sand.

A teardrop falling on water.

The moon circling the Earth.

A circle turning into a square.

Sun turning into darkness.

The ink is blurring now.

The line is fading.

And with strange aeons…

Even the paper will reduce into dust.

Your geometry will be lost. Along with everything reminding it. You will be alone at the end. And your tears will fall in the water. And they will create circles again. Don’t cry. Just take the pen. Don’t wander whether you can draw one on paper. You know you can…

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