Mindfulness.

Advertisements
Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Ever wonder why some people seem to feel less pain than others? A study conducted at Wake Forest School of Medicine may have found one of the answers — mindfulness. “Mindfulness is related to being aware of the present moment without too much emotional reaction or judgment,” said the study’s lead author, Fadel Zeidan, Ph.D., assistant professor of neurobiology and anatomy at the medical school, part of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. “We now know that some people are more mindful than others, and those people seemingly feel less pain.” (1)

Weird.

Focusing on the “now” makes you feel less pain, while the opposite would sound more logical.

And yet, what is “now” but the complete ignorance of everything else than existence itself?

There is nothing here NOW.

Not your senses. Not the others. Not even your own self. Nothing. Just you. Alone. Wandering in the forest of pure existence. Step into that river and everything will go away. Step into that river and suddenly things will start being as only inexistent things can ever be…

You do not “feel” pain.

You chose to make pain be…

And now all the universe is crying with you…

Meditation going wrong? Watch out what you look for…

Advertisements

Meditation is increasingly being marketed as a treatment for conditions such as pain, depression, stress and addiction, and while many people achieve therapeutic goals, other meditators encounter a much broader range of experiences – sometimes distressing and even impairing ones – along the way.

Meditators reported multiple unexpected experiences from across the seven domains of experience. For example, a commonly reported challenging experience in the perceptual domain was hypersensitivity to light or sound, while somatic changes such as insomnia or involuntary body movements were also reported. Challenging emotional experiences could include fear, anxiety, panic or a loss of emotions altogether. (1)

As any powerful tool, meditation can also turn against its practitioner.

Any knowledge comes with personal pain.

Remember what happened in the forest with Midas.

The abyss is not for everyone to look at.

Not just because it may stare back.

But because you might realize that you are (creating) the abyss.

Every fear, every emotion, every pain is yours. Every experience which you have lived or which you will is yours. Every life and death in this world is yours. You are the creator of life. You are the destroyer of the worlds.

Do you like you?

Meditation. Compassion. Ancient knowledge, long gone…

Advertisements

Mounting evidence of the impact of contemplative practices like meditation (which we now know can, quite literally, rewire the brain) are finally bringing modern science up to speed with ancient wisdom.

Mindfulness and compassion — the practices of cultivating a focused awareness on the present moment, and extending a loving awareness to others — are part of every religion and wisdom tradition, and we’re at last beginning to understand the profound impact that they have on the brain, says psychiatrist and mindfulness expert Dr. Dan Siegel. (1)

Try to remember.
Try to go back.

Back to an era where you did not “understand”.
But you did know.

Back to an era where you did not analyze the cosmos into pieces.
But you did see the whole as One.

Back to an era where you were more “primitive”.
But more wise in any sense…

Meditation results and Religion as a “Set of Wisdom”…

Advertisements

A new research reveals that transcendental meditation could slash the risk of heart attack and stroke (and in the meanwhile make you less angry). [1] Another research published in the “Frontiers on Human Neuroscience” revealed that meditation can help control negative emotions like fear and anger while it enhances positive emotions like compassion and sensitivity to other peoples’ problems. [2]

Harmonia Philosophica has many times beforepostulated the positive effect of things which are called and considered “religious” in nature. Some people tend to forget that Religion was (and still is in many things) a collection of wisdom accumulated many centuries ago…

Related articles: