Brain. Memory. Flashes and lights…

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A new study from Nathan Rose, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Notre Dame, examined a fundamental problem your brain has to solve, which is keeping information “in mind”, or active, so your brain can act accordingly.

The common theory is that the information is kept in mind by neurons related to the information actively firing throughout a delay period, a theory that has been dominant since at least the 1940s, according to Rose.

However, in a new paper published in Science, Rose and his team give weight to the synaptic theory, a less well-known and tested model. The synaptic theory suggests that information can be retained for short periods of time by specific changes in the links, or weights, between neurons.

And even though a specific memory could seem vanished from the brain (due to total lack of any neuron activity), when researchers reactivated specific regions of the brain which were previously active when the memory was formed, the specific pattern of the phenomenally lost memory reappeared out of the blue. (1)

We do NOT know how and where data is stored into our brain. And yet, we are so certain that it is stored there… Even though evidence suggests something “else” is keeping the information inside “us”, we are so certain that this is based on the brain that no alternative might be considered.

We like seeing flashes and lights. And we believe what we see.

This memory was “not there”. And yet, we believed it was still there. And we managed to find it. Reappearing only after the brain region was stimulated again. But could this memory or any memory be stored in the neurons’ structure of an ever-changing brain? Or is it more logical to assume that it is stored in the ever-lasting structure of an eternal cosmos?

Everything changes. And yet we stay the same.

One self, with memories. Wandering through the cold cosmos.

Pondering. Who are we? What dark dreams have haunted us?

I had forgotten. But now I know again. My memory is back…

Those flashes and lights…

Out of the darkness, light again.

Oh, how much we like seeing flashes and lights…

Memories. For ever (changing)…

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Conventional memories used in today’s computers only differentiate between the bit values 0 and 1. In quantum physics, however, arbitrary superpositions of these two states are possible. Most of the ideas for new quantum technology devices rely on this “Superposition Principle”. One of the main challenges in using such states is that they are usually short-lived. Only for a short period of time can information be read out of quantum memories reliably, after that it is irrecoverable.

A research team at TU Wien has now taken an important step forward in the development of new quantum storage concepts. In cooperation with the Japanese telecommunication giant NTT, the Viennese researchers lead by Johannes Majer are working on quantum memories based on nitrogen atoms and microwaves. The nitrogen atoms have slightly different properties, which quickly leads to the loss of the quantum state. By specifically changing a small portion of the atoms, one can bring the remaining atoms into a new quantum state, with a lifetime enhancement of more than a factor of ten. These results have been published in the journal “Nature Photonics”. (1)

The atoms are everywhere. Changing all the time. But we want them to be somewhere. In order to control them. In order to keep information there.

Because we want to create memories.

In an ever changing world, we want to find stability. Even though everything changes all the time, we want them to follow stable rules, patterns, certain paths. Inside everything, we need something. We seek constancy in an ever turbulent cosmos.

Because we need to be able to remember. To know.

And the weird thing is that we do know. Even though it seems we cannot find stability, we somehow find it. Because we do remember. Because we Are. Something we do not fully grasp now. And yet, we feel it. The world is not what it seems to be. The world can stop moving. The world can stop changing. The world can come to a halt.

As long as we decide it.

As long as we stop trying.

As long as we accept it is already stable…

See the stars moving.

They are not.

Yes, now I remember!

Speaking English. Speaking Spanish. Speaking… whatever. [Ghosts in the machine, or in the brain instead…]

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The family of a 16-year-old Georgia boy is describing how he woke from a coma speaking Spanish instead of English. Reuben Nsemoh was playing goalie for a Gwinnett County team late last month when another player accidentally kicked him in the head while he was diving for the ball, local ABC affiliate WSB-TV reported.

The high school sophomore, who has now suffered three soccer-related concussions, fell into a coma for several days. When he woke up, he could only speak in Spanish instead of English.

Reuben, whose English has since returned, said he knew a little Spanish because his friends and a brother speak the language. But he’d never felt comfortable holding a conversation in Spanish before his injury, he said. “I wasn’t perfect, but my brother is a really fluent Spanish speaker, so he kind of inspired me with that too,” he told WSB. His Spanish gradually slipped away after he woke up, Reuben said. (1)

The brain knows things the mind is not aware of.

All input is somewhere somehow recorded.

And readily available for anyone who can access them.

Now imagine something bigger than the Spanish language you heard once. Imagine that your brain/ mind has interfered with the whole cosmos. Imagine that your brain/ mind interferes with the whole cosmos constantly from ever since you were born. Imagine you being in a universe and constantly learning without ever knowing you learn.

Now imagine you are dumb.

Imagine you know nothing.

How absurd that sounds?

Remembering rules. Math. Blind cosmos… [Against mathematical operations?!]

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Children differ substantially in their mathematical abilities. In fact, some children cannot routinely add or subtract, even after extensive schooling. This new paper proposes that math disability arises from abnormalities in brain areas supporting procedural memory. Procedural memory is a learning and memory system that is crucial for the automation of non-conscious skills, such as driving or grammar. (1)

We learn rules.

We then learn math based on rules which we memorize.

Failure to do so makes us “bad” at math. And yet why should that be a problem? Why should we “learn rules” and memorize them? Why should we interpret or measure the cosmos based on these rules?

In a world where everything is One and non-dividable we try to learn the rules of division. In a world made out of oblivion, we try to base our civilization on remembering…

How can 1+1 even have meaning,

when One is clearly defined?

New neurons. Old neurons…

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Buried deep underneath the folds of the cerebral cortex, neural stem cells in the hippocampus continue to generate new neurons, inciting a struggle between new and old as the new attempts to gain a foothold in memory-forming center of the brain. [tip: we do not know where and how memory is stored but anyway] Researchers have found they can bias competition in favor of newly generated neurons. Results may have implications for PTSD, MCI, and age-related memory loss. (1)

The new always fights with the old. The old always fights with the new. But they are essentially the same. Why not have an old neuron “store” (how? We do not know yet) a “new” memory? Why not use a new neuron hold an “old” existing memory? Who/ what “decides” which memory to store? And why on Earth do we always view the ‘new’ as better than the ‘old’?

The new always fights with the old.

The old always fights with the new.

Fighting a fight that is not their own…