Too many questions…

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How do our personalities develop? What do we come with and what is built from our experiences? Once developed, how does personality work? These questions have been steeped in controversy for almost as long as psychology has existed.

In an article in Psychological Review, Carol Dweck tackles these issues. She proposes that our personalities develop around basic needs, and she begins by documenting the three basic psychological needs we all come with: the need to predict our world, the need to build competence to act on our world, and, because we are social beings, the need for acceptance from others. (She also shows how new needs emerge later from combinations of these basic needs.)

Infants arrive highly prepared to meet these needs – they are brilliant, voracious learners on the lookout for need-relevant information. Then, as infants try to meet their needs, something important happens. They start building beliefs about their world and their role in it: Is the world good or bad, safe or dangerous? Can I act on my world to meet my needs? These beliefs, plus the emotions and action tendencies that are stored with them, are termed “BEATs”. They represent the accumulated experiences people have had trying to meet their needs, and they play a key role in personality – both the invisible and the visible parts of personality. (1)

A seemingly elegant theory.

But imagine you are being thrown into an unknown forest.

Waking up among big tall trees. Listening to the silence.

Afraid of the darkness.

What would be your first thought?

How to predict? How to act? How to become… accepted?

Or the simple and raw questions… Where am I? Who am I?

It is easy to get lost in the forest.

If you only look at the millions of trees.

We have lost our ability to ask the right questions.

Because we ask too many…

Mapping the genome. The illusion of “dimensions”…

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Cells face a daunting task. They have to neatly pack a several meter-long thread of genetic material into a nucleus that measures only five micrometers across. This origami creates spatial interactions between genes and their switches, which can affect human health and disease. Now, an international team of scientists has devised a powerful new technique that ‘maps’ this three-dimensional geography of the entire genome. Their paper is published in Nature. (1)

We like analyzing things.

So we have “discovered” dimensions.

And the more we analyze, the more dimensions seem to be there.

From the extra dimension of time to the extra dimensions of new physics’ theories to adding dimensions of analysis of human behavior or to adding dimensions in the ways genome is mapped or in the ways it expresses itself, we are all doing the same thing over and over again: Adding complexity to a simple world. We may name it “Discovering complexity” but in reality, all this ‘discovery’ is just in our mind.

Humans were on Earth for millions of years.

The genome was there all the time.

With no maps. No dimensions.

Expressing itself.

Part of a human.

Part of a cosmos.

So in essence, it was never there.

Because there was no human.

There was no self in the first place.

There was no genome.

Just the cosmos.

Expressing itself.

The map is empty.

See?

Diseases. Symptoms. Analysis. Over-analysis…

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Ten finalists have been chosen in a $10m (£6m) competition to develop a real-life “tricorder” – the medical scanner used in the Star Trek series.

The Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize, launched last year, challenges anyone to develop a wireless device capable of detecting a range of diseases.

The technology employs sensors and imaging to measure vital signs and diagnose conditions non-invasively. (1)

We like to analyze things. But we are whole. And when balance is lost, one cannot blame just one thing.

Choose to give 10$ million to over analyze symptoms.
Or choose to see what is in front of your eyes for free…

It is your choice.

Make it count.

Analyzing more. Explaining less. Another plague of modern science…

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Ecologists are testing more and more hypotheses, but their studies are explaining less of the world. That’s the striking conclusion of a new study that analyzes 8 decades of research papers. What exactly is driving these trends isn’t clear, but researchers fear it could undermine confidence in ecological research.

Since it gained momentum as a formal field of study in the 1800s, ecology has focused on understanding interactions among organisms and their environments. Ecologists have made major contributions to shaping modern views of how the natural world works, from documenting competition and cooperation in nature to clarifying the valuable services that ecosystems can provide to humans, such as purifying water or buffering storms and floods. As in many sciences, however, the field has become less descriptive and more quantitative as it matured. (1)

We tend to over-analyze things. And that will always lead us away from One.

We once thought in Monads. Now we like infinity.

We have taken the wrong path.

And it needs courage to admit it and go back…

As magnocrat said, “An expert is a man who knows more and more about less and less and ends by knowing everything about nothing”. Let us be that man.

Extra sensory perceptions… One consciousness…

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Ask Harvard Medical School researchers how many senses humans have and you’re bound to receive a range of answers. This lack of consensus isn’t limited to Harvard: Neurologists and others who study perception have long disagreed on the number of senses we possess to help us navigate our way through life.

Researchers argue that true senses are bodily systems consisting of a group of sensory cell types that not only respond to a specific physical phenomenon but also correspond to a particular region in the brain. Using that definition, many neurologists recognize additional human senses.

Equilibrioception. Whether you’re slaloming down a slope or strutting down a street, this sense—otherwise known as balance—helps keeps you upright. Although vision plays a role in equilibrioception, the vestibular system of the inner ear is mainly responsible.

Nociception. If you’ve touched a boiling kettle or stubbed a toe, you’re likely all too familiar with nociception, the sense of pain. Recent research shows that what was once viewed as a subjective experience related to touch is, in fact, a distinct phenomenon that corresponds to a specific area in the brain.

Proprioception. Close your eyes and touch your fingertip to your nose. Quick: Where’s your hand? Unless you suffer from a deficit of this kinesthetic sense, you know where your hand is, even though you can’t see it. This sense, the awareness of where your body parts are, sounds silly—until you consider that without it, you’d have to constantly watch your feet to make sure they were planted on the ground.

And the list goes on and on…

(1)

We tend to analyze things.
We tend to find more and more components of something.
But overanalysis leads not to infinity.
Overanalysis leads to One after all.
Analyze your senses to 1,000 senses.
And you will finally see that you only have one…