Why people suffer? – Call for philosophical essays

Photo by Spiros Kakos in Pexels

Humans are averted to suffering. We do not wish to ache or cry.

Yet, life is full of pain.

Why?

Of what use is that pain?

How could good people suffer while others are spared the day? Is there a plan behind all this or are we just trying to discover meaning where there is nothing to find or say?

Send your essays to Harmonia Philosophica (harmoniaPhilosophica.com) and see them published in our portal. All submissions adhering to the submission requirements will be published, unless you wish not to.

Submission Requirements

  • Minimum length: 50 words.
  • Content: Submissions must be relative to the topic and have a philosophical flavor.
  • Publication indication: Please indicate explicitly in your submission whether you wish us to publish your essay and under what name (could be an alias). Essays that do not explicitly mention these publication details will not be published due to data protection regulations.
  • Deadline: December 2022.
  • Contact info: harmonia-philosophica@hotmail.com

Seek Harmonia Philosophica article ‘Why do good people suffer?‘ for inspiration.

Looking forward to your ideas!

Mindfulness.

Photo by Spiros Kakos from Pexels

Ever wonder why some people seem to feel less pain than others? A study conducted at Wake Forest School of Medicine may have found one of the answers — mindfulness. “Mindfulness is related to being aware of the present moment without too much emotional reaction or judgment,” said the study’s lead author, Fadel Zeidan, Ph.D., assistant professor of neurobiology and anatomy at the medical school, part of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. “We now know that some people are more mindful than others, and those people seemingly feel less pain.” (1)

Weird.

Focusing on the “now” makes you feel less pain, while the opposite would sound more logical.

And yet, what is “now” but the complete ignorance of everything else than existence itself?

There is nothing here NOW.

Not your senses. Not the others. Not even your own self. Nothing. Just you. Alone. Wandering in the forest of pure existence. Step into that river and everything will go away. Step into that river and suddenly things will start being as only inexistent things can ever be…

You do not “feel” pain.

You chose to make pain be…

And now all the universe is crying with you…

Phantom reality… Affecting reality…

In breakthrough research led by neuroscientist Olaf Blanke and his team at EPFL, Switzerland, the scientists show that phantom body pain can be reduced in paraplegics by creating a bodily illusion with the help of virtual reality. The results are published in Neurology.

“We managed to provoke an illusion: the illusion that the subject’s legs were being lightly tapped, when in fact the subject was actually being tapped on the back, above the spinal cord lesion,” explains Blanke, lead author of the study and holder of the Foundation Bertarelli Chair in Cognitive Neuroprosthetics. “When we did this, the subjects also reported that their pain had diminished”. (1)

Illusions in the mirror.

Affecting the reflection…

And yet the reflection is real.

Just don’t disturb the water…

Sleep. Walk. Feel no pain…

 

A new study of sleepwalkers found an intriguing paradox: Although sleepwalkers have an increased risk for headaches and migraines while awake, during sleepwalking episodes they are unlikely to feel pain even while suffering an injury.

Results show that sleepwalkers were nearly 4 times more likely than controls to report a history of headaches (odds ratio = 3.80) and 10 times more likely to report experiencing migraines (OR = 10.04), after adjusting for potential confounders such as insomnia and depression. Among sleepwalkers with at least one previous sleepwalking episode that involved an injury, 79 percent perceived no pain during the episode, allowing them to remain asleep despite hurting themselves.

“Our most surprising result was the lack of pain perception during the sleepwalking episodes,” said principal investigator Dr. Regis Lopez, psychiatrist and sleep medicine specialist at Hospital Gui-de-Chauliac in Montpellier, France. “We report here, for the first time, an analgesia phenomenon associated with sleepwalking.”

Study results are published in the November issue of the journal Sleep. (1)

Pain is our criterion of being alive.

Feeling is our criterion of being alive.

But what if the opposite is true?

What if only when you are truly alive you do not feel pain at all?

Challenge your definitions and assumptions. And you might end up with a different reality. What is “true” after all? Who knows. Perhaps something in between. Perhaps the resultant of all possibilities. Perhaps both 1 and -1. Perhaps 0.

Pain. No pain. => No feeling is the solution.

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