Faster than light. In nothingness…

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It has long been known that charged particles, such as electrons and protons, produce the electromagnetic equivalent of a sonic boom when their speeds exceed that of photons in the surrounding medium. This effect, known as Cherenkov emission, is responsible for the characteristic blue glow from water in a nuclear reactor, and is used to detect particles at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

According to Einstein, nothing can travel faster than light in vacuum. Because of this, it is usually assumed that the Cherenkov emission cannot occur in vacuum. But according to quantum theory, the vacuum itself is packed full of “virtual particles,” which move momentarily in and out of existence.

These ghostly particles are usually not observable but, in the presence of extremely strong electric and magnetic fields, they can turn the vacuum into an optical medium where the speed of light is slowed down so that high velocity charged particles can emit Cherenkov gamma rays. This is totally unexpected in a vacuum.

A group of Physics researchers at Strathclyde have found that in extreme conditions, such as found at the focus of the world’s most powerful lasers, and the huge magnetic fields around neutron stars, this ‘polarised’ vacuum can slow down gamma rays just enough for Cherenkov emission to occur. (1)

In the cosmos of phenomena, even nothing is not real.

And in the void of existence, something will always be.

In a universe ruled by light, things still travel faster than it.

Defying the rules. For the only rule is that there are no rules.

In a cosmos of being, everything can and will exist.

Only to show that being is defining the definitions.

Watch that particle travel faster than light.

It is not traveling at all, you know.

You are…

Ask it and it will tell you. It is standing still.

Watching you traveling faster than light…

And yet, it makes the same mistake as you did.

It never asked you whether you feel running…

Heat waves. Like… sound waves?

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The next time you set a kettle to boil, consider this scenario: After turning the burner off, instead of staying hot and slowly warming the surrounding kitchen and stove, the kettle quickly cools to room temperature and its heat hurtles away in the form of a boiling-hot wave.

We know heat doesn’t behave this way in our day-to-day surroundings. But MIT researchers observed this seemingly implausible mode of heat transport, known as “second sound,” in a rather commonplace material: graphite.

At temperatures of 120 kelvin (-240 degrees Fahrenheit), they saw clear signs that heat can travel through graphite in a wavelike motion. Points that were originally warm are left instantly cold, as the heat moves across the material at close to the speed of sound. The behavior resembles the wavelike way in which sound travels through air, so scientists have dubbed this exotic mode of heat transport “second sound.”

The discovery, published in Science, suggests that graphite, and perhaps its high-performance relative, graphene, may efficiently remove heat in microelectronic devices in a way that was previously unrecognized. (1)

The world seems dominated by waves.

Waves of gravity.

Waves of sound.

Heat waves.

Waves on the rough sea.

Waves of people moving together.

Places of high heat. Places of extreme cold.

Taking turns in the split of a second.

Because there is no heat to be transferred.

Only the cosmos’ potential to change on the spot.

A cosmos full of consciousness.

A cosmos full of empty space.

Both taking turns on the substrate of existence.

With Being orchestrating everything.

A rock on a pond.

Generating waves.

Watch the waves reaching the shore.

Slowing degrading.

No, it is not the rock which made them be.

But the surface of the lake itself.

Look deep inside that lake, and you will see…

That no rock ever reached the bottom…

Small little insects… Making the ocean move… Modern science… Shrimps laughing…

Scientists have demonstrated how some of the smallest creatures in the ocean could have the same outsized impact under the waves – with swarms of marine organisms inadvertently producing powerful currents that mix and churn a turbulent undersea environment.

“Right now a lot of our ocean climate models don’t include the effect of animals, or if they do it’s as passive participants in the process”. Strength in numbers, it turns out, as swarms of the creatures migrate daily in vertical columns, feeding at the ocean surface by night, before retreating hundreds of metres deep by day.

“You have this massive migration vertically every day of literally trillions of organisms”, Dabiri told NPR. “As they start swimming upward, each of them kicks a little bit of fluid backward”. The team discovered the animals’ passing didn’t just distribute water in small, localised regions, but churned significant volumes of proxy ocean pretty much everywhere they went.

So far, these effects have only been demonstrated in the lab, but if the same thing is taking place out in the real world, biologists and oceanographers will need to rethink how marine life contributes to ocean turbulence – especially since the same thing could be happening with bigger animals, such as jellyfish, squid, fish, and even large mammals. (1)

Ancient civilizations thought of the cosmos as something alive.

Then came Descartes, Galileo and modern science.

And we “discovered” the “objective” world of phenomena…

We suddenly “knew” we lived in a cold lifeless cosmos.

And we developed great science…

While shrimps were laughing at us…

The cosmos is still alive.

It always was.

It is just us who died.

Watch that shrimp you are cooking. It is not a shrimp.

It is the universe itself. Boiling with fierce power.

Just… add a pinch of salt.

Yes. Now it’s better.

Now come on.

Let’s eat my daughter…

New states of matter. Fake reality. Real silence.

Researchers have recently produced a “human scale” demonstration of a new phase of matter called quadrupole topological insulators (QTI) that was recently predicted using theoretical physics. These were the first experimental findings to validate this theory. The researchers reported their findings in the journal Nature.

The team’s work with QTIs was born out of the decade-old understanding of the properties of a class of materials called topological insulators (TI). “TIs are electrical insulators on the inside and conductors along their boundaries, and may hold great potential for helping build low-power, robust computers and devices, all defined at the atomic scale”, said mechanical science and engineering professor and senior investigator Gaurav Bahl.

The uncommon properties of TIs make them a special form of electronic matter. “Collections of electrons can form their own phases within materials. These can be familiar solid, liquid and gas phases like water, but they can also sometimes form more unusual phases like a TI”, said co-author and physics professor Taylor Hughes .

However, there are still many theoretical predictions that need to be confirmed regarding TIs. One such prediction was the existence of a new type of TI having an electrical property known as a quadrupole moment. “Electrons are single particles that carry charge in a material”, said physics graduate student Wladimir Benalcazar. “We found that electrons in crystals can collectively arrange to give rise not only to charge dipole units – that is, pairings of positive and negative charges – but also high-order multipoles in which four or eight charges are brought together into a unit. The simplest member of these higher-order classes are quadrupoles in which two positive and two negative charges are coupled”. (1)

We keep on discovering new types of particles.

We keep on discovering new dimensions.

We keep on discovering new states of matter.

We keep on breaking the mirror of reality into pieces.

And the more we discover, the more we come to a great revelation.

What is dead, cannot die. What is alive, will be alive forever.

You cannot discover new dimensions of nothing.

You can never discover new states of matter.

You cannot discover many types of anything.

You cannot dissolve existence into zero.

You cannot break anything into smaller parts.

Unless there was nothing there in the first place…

Fallen souls we are… Meddling with ghosts… Handling shadows… Stop seeing, if you want to start sensing you. There is nothing more to discover about yourself. There is no way of dissecting your experience. You cannot analyze it more. You already know everything or anything about you. You are real. You are the light of the cosmos. An inner light. Shedding its powerful beams to the depths of your existence.

Until you decide to shed the light outside.

And the shadows begin to appear…

Light speed. Less than 1000 m/s.

Researchers at TU Wien were the first to successfully detect Weyl particles in strongly correlated electron systems – that is, materials where the electrons have a strong interaction with each other. In materials like this, the Weyl particles move extremely slowly, despite having no mass.

“The strong interactions in such materials usually lead, via the so-called Kondo effect, to particles behaving as if they had an extremely large mass”, explains Sami Dzsaber. “So it was astonishing for us to detect Weyl fermions with a mass of zero in this particular type of material”. According to the laws of relativity, free massless particles must always spread at light speed. This is, however, not the case in solid states: “Even though our Weyl fermions have no mass, their speed is extremely low,” says Bühler-Paschen. The solid state lends them its own fixed ‘light speed’ to a certain extent. This is lower than 1000 m/s, i.e. only around three millionth of the speed of light in a vacuum. “As such, they are even slower than phonons, the analogue to the water wave in the solid state, and this makes them detectable in our experiment”. (1)

Low speeds. High speeds.

What is the difference?

The light is fast. But not for light.

Weyl particles are slow. But not for Weyl particles.

The limits you imagine are not there.

Imagine a Weyl particle.

Fast as 10 m/s…

Massless particles. Heavy particles.

High speed particles. Low speed particles.

Depending on the environmental interactions.

Remove them and see.

Everything is fast. Everything is slow…

Imagine a Weyl particle. Fast as light…

In the beginning everything was still and fast as light at the same time. Until we came. And started observing… The cosmos was once still and, thus, fast like lightning. Then the cosmos started moving. And everything came to a halt.

Note: Weyl particles are not particles which can move on their own (like electrons or protons), they only exist as ‘quasiparticles’ within a solid material. “Quasiparticles are not particles in the conventional sense, but rather excitations of a system consisting of many interacting particles”, explains Prof. Silke Bühler-Paschen from the Institute of Solid State Physics at TU Wien. In some sense, they are similar to a wave in water. The wave is not a water molecule, rather it is based on the movement of many molecules. When the wave moves forward, this does not mean that the particles in the water are moving at that speed. It is not the water molecules themselves, but their excitation in wave form that spreads. After physician Paul Dirac had arrived at his Dirac equation in 1928, which can be used to describe the behavior of relativistic electrons, Hermann Weyl found a particular solution for this equation – namely for particles with zero mass, or ‘Weyl fermions’. The neutrino was originally thought to be such a massless Weyl particle, until it was discovered that it does indeed have mass. The mysterious Weyl fermions were, in fact, detected for the first time in 2015.

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