Elusive motion… Only if still moving…

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In temperatures millions of times colder than interstellar space, researchers have performed the coldest reaction in the known universe. But that’s not all. In such intense cold, their molecules slowed to such glacial speeds, they could see something no one has been able to see before: the moment when two molecules meet to form two new molecules. In essence, they captured a chemical reaction in its most critical and elusive act. (1)

And so we captured motion.

So slow that it is barely visible.

And yet, still visible.

Could we slow down that motion even more?

Up to the point of having no motion at all?

Up to the point of having everything standing still?

Watch out for Achilles.

What you are really watching?

Flip the cosmos upside down.

And you will see it upside down!

A cosmos standing still.

A cosmos moving fast.

A cosmos warming up.

A cosmos moving faster.

The more it moves, the better you can see it moving.

Don’t you see?

Everything is more evident when it is more evident.

What if it stands still?

Can you see what you cannot see?

New force…

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Everything in our Universe is held together or pushed apart by four fundamental forces: gravity, electromagnetism, and two nuclear interactions. Physicists now think they’ve spotted the actions of a fifth physical force emerging from a helium atom.

It’s not the first time researchers claim to have caught a glimpse of it, either. A few years ago, they saw it in the decay of an isotope of beryllium. Now the same team has seen a second example of the mysterious force at play – and the particle they think is carrying it, which they’re calling X17.

The team seems to discover a new particle the characteristics of which suggested it had to be a completely new kind of fundamental boson. We currently know of four fundamental forces, and we know that three of them have bosons carrying their messages of attraction and repulsion.

This new boson couldn’t possibly be one of the particles carrying the four known forces, thanks to its distinctive mass of (17 megaelectronvolts, or about 33 times that of an electron), and tiny life span (of about 10 to the minus 14 seconds).

But physics isn’t keen on celebrating prematurely. Finding a new particle is always big news in physics, and warrants a lot of scrutiny. Not to mention repeated experiment. (1)

Humans lost in their quest for more knowledge.

New particles.

New forces.

New… whatever we know already.

Modern physics looks the cosmos through its own lenses. And interprets everything accordingly. When something is not in place, it seeks to fill in the puzzle with a new piece. And it searches for that new piece in – where else? – this things it already knows. So like a stupid uroborus ofis (Gr. Ουροβόρος όφις) it keeps on verifying itself by looking for answers back to… itself.

Don’t you see?

There is nothing which you see that you have not seen already…

And in the beginning you were blind.

It is just that we need a new Einstein to tell us so.

Benzene. Dimensions. Reality.

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Nearly 200 years after the molecule was discovered by Michael Faraday, researchers have finally revealed the complex electronic structure of benzene.

This not only settles a debate that has been raging since the 1930s, this step has important implications for the future development of opto-electronic materials, many of which are built on benzenes.

The atomic structure of benzene is pretty well understood. It’s a ring consisting of six carbon atoms, and six hydrogen atoms, one attached to each of the carbon atoms.

Where it gets extremely tricky is when we consider the molecule’s 42 electrons.

“The mathematical function that describes benzene’s electrons is 126-dimensional,” chemist Timothy Schmidt of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science and UNSW Sydney in Australia told ScienceAlert.

“That means it is a function of 126 coordinates, three for each of the 42 electrons. The electrons are not independent, so we cannot break this down into 42 independent three-dimensional functions. (1)

126 dimensions.

3 dimensions.

2 dimensions.

Does it matter?

Benzene is here. And so are you.

Roaming the cosmos.

In a thousand dimensions!

Listening to the rain.

In one single dimension.

Touching happiness.

In three dimensions.

Does it matter?

Are you defining dimensions?

Or are dimensions defining you?

As more dimensions reveal themselves, the more the cosmos will be extinct from one. And the more we see through the broken glass, the more we will ignore the fact that once upon a time, it was not broken.

Without 126 dimensions.

Without benzene.

Just you.

Ready to go home.

And discover benzene!

Changing geometry. Blurry lines…

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Atomic interactions in everyday solids and liquids are so complex that some of these materials’ properties continue to elude physicists’ understanding. Solving the problems mathematically is beyond the capabilities of modern computers, so scientists at Princeton University have turned to an unusual branch of geometry instead.

Researchers led by Andrew Houck, a professor of electrical engineering, have built an electronic array on a microchip that simulates particle interactions in a hyperbolic plane, a geometric surface in which space curves away from itself at every point. A hyperbolic plane is difficult to envision — the artist M.C. Escher used hyperbolic geometry in many of his mind-bending pieces — but is perfect for answering questions about particle interactions and other challenging mathematical questions. (1)

Draw a line on the paper.

Look at the circle on the sand.

A teardrop falling on water.

The moon circling the Earth.

A circle turning into a square.

Sun turning into darkness.

The ink is blurring now.

The line is fading.

And with strange aeons…

Even the paper will reduce into dust.

Your geometry will be lost. Along with everything reminding it. You will be alone at the end. And your tears will fall in the water. And they will create circles again. Don’t cry. Just take the pen. Don’t wander whether you can draw one on paper. You know you can…

Colour. And shape…

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There are hundreds of thousands of distinct colors and shapes that a person can distinguish visually, but how does the brain process all of this information? Scientists previously believed that the visual system initially encodes shape and color with different sets of neurons and then combines them much later. But a new study from Salk researchers, published in Science on June 27, 2019, shows that there are neurons that respond selectively to particular combinations of color and shape. (1)

Looking red. Grapes.

No, I mean strawberries.

Looking yellow. Sea.

No, I mean the sun!

Looking black. Day.

No, I mean the night…

Watch out. The cosmos gives hints on what you see. But the only way to see them is not to look. Take a stand. Dance during noon. Sleep during the day. There is shape in colors. There are colors in shapes. But only because there are no shapes. Only because there are no colors! Potential implies absurdity. Possibility implies fallacy.

The essential things of this cosmos cannot be something else.

Pay attention!

Nature likes playing.

The true meaning of life like not in things which can be not.

See what cannot be combined with anything and you will see what makes combinations of any sort possible. Whatever is not there, will show everywhere. Whatever cannot be, will manifest in any possible way. Ghosts shown in multiple combinations. While true darkness is watching silently from aside.. Look at what you can’t see. Close your eyes. Feel what you know. Imagine it. In the dark corner of the cave. There. Untouched. Unspoken. Non-existent.. And yet, it is there. Can’t you see?. It can never have a shape or color…

Shape and color exist because of it!

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